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Thread: Jats in Gujarat

  1. #1

    Jats in Gujarat

    Gujarat (Gujarati: ગુજરાત) is the second-most industrialized state in the India (after Maharashtra). Gujarat borders Pakistan, and the states of Rajasthan to the north-east, Madhya Pradesh to the east, Maharashtra and the Union territories of Diu, Daman, Dadra and Nagar Haveli to the south. Many settlements of the Indus Valley Civilization, also known as the Harappan Civilization, have been found in Gujarat. The most important of these are the trade port of Lothal in south eastern Gujarat and Dholavira in western Gujarat.

    The name of the state is derived from Gujjarātta (Gurjar Rāshtra), which means the land of the Gujjars. It is believed that a tribe of Gujjars migrated to India around the 5th century. Gujarat's coastal cities, chiefly Bharuch, served as ports and trading centres for the Maurya and Gupta empires. After the collapse of the Gupta empire in the 6th century, Gujarat flourished as an independent Hindu kingdom. The Maitraka dynasty, descended from a Gupta general, ruled from the 6th to the 8th centuries from their capital at Vallabhi, although they were ruled briefly by Harsha during the 7th century. In 775 the first Parsi (Zoroastrian) refugees arrived in Gujarat from Iran. The Arab rulers of Sind sacked Vallabhi in 770, bringing the Maitraka dynasty to an end. A branch of the Pratihara clan ruled Gujarat after the eighth century.

    Jats in Gujarat
    Ethnically there are four groups of people who came to inhabit this land at different points of time and now form the majority here. These are Jats, Ahirs, Rabaris and Harijans. The Jats came from a place in Iran called Half (to be known latter as Jat) and they were herders by occupation. Around five hundred years ago they came to Kutch and Sind in search of new grazing pastures and settled there. Those who joined agriculture called themselves Garasia Jats and those who continued their ancestral occupation were known as Dhanetah Jats, and those who chose to study the Koran became Fakirani Jats. [http://www.tourmyindia.com/states/gujrat/index.html]

    The jats of Gujarat have many similarities with those of Haryana, Punjab, and Rajasthan. A few villages in Gujarat were jats live are Rampura, Motidhani, Nani Dhani etc. These villages are near about Deesa and Palanpur and the gotras found there are Jakhar, Jyani, Godara, Lunayach, Tada, Siyol, Bhari, Nain, Dhaka etc. The Jats of Gujarat are wealthy and landlords. The Banaskantha district has many Jat villages where a sizable population lives. The Jat population of these villages is about about 30000. These villages are near about national highway 15 and 8.[http://www.jatland.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8096]

    Gujarat state has a sizable Hindu Jat population. There are about 3000 families dwelling in Ahmedabad. 60 % of these people are engaged in Industrial works, such as Mills, Factories and shops. 20 % are in middle level jobs or small-scale industries. Balance 20 % are either in higher-level jobs are middle level Industries. Some Jat families are mill owners also.

    The Jats in Gujarat have come from Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Rajasthan, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. Patels and Chaudharys of Gujarat consider themselves to be Jats of Gujarat. They are settled mainly in Mehsana district and surrounding areas. The Sagar Milk Dairy is their creation. The Chaudharys of Gujarat are also known as Anjana. The gotras of many of the Chaudharys of Gujarat are similar to those of Jats of North India. They have following gotras as given in list below. The way they are written in Gujarati is given in brackets.

    List of Jat gotras
    Antal - Utpal (Uplana)
    Atwal (Ant)
    Bhatti (Bhatiya)
    Chauhan, Chawan, Chahar (Chauhan)
    Dal, Dhal (Del)
    Dhaliwal, Dhariwal (Dholiya)
    Gaur, Goru (Gaur, Gor)
    Godara-Godha (Goda)
    Gulia (Galia)
    Henga, Haga (Hun)
    Katariya (Katotariya)
    Maan (Manar)
    Mahla, Mahlawat (Mahiya)
    Nauhwar (Nauwar)
    Pallwal (Pilatar)
    Parihar (Parihar, Padhiyar)
    Pauniya (Paun)
    Pawar (Parmar)
    Punia (Pooliya)
    Rathor (Rathor, Rathod)
    Rawat (Rawat)
    Sikarwar, Sakarwar (Sakariya)
    Singhmar (Singh)
    Sirohi, Saroha (Siroha)
    Solanki, Solgi (Solanki)

    Note: - The above list comparing the Gotras is based on VP Desai’s book “Bharat ke chaudhary” (Bharatna Anjana). VP Desai has mentioned that this caste had done great struggle for the freedom of India and they ruled India for about ten centuries democratically.
    Reference
    *Mahaveer Singh Verma: Jat Veer Smarika 1992 – “Jat Samaj Ahmedabad”
    External links
    *http://www.tourmyindia.com/states/gujrat/index.html
    *http://www.jatland.com/forums/showthread.php?t=8096
    Laxman Burdak

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  3. #2
    wonderful stuff .. very informative
    Foot Soldier - Azad Hind Fauj - becasue the struggle is not over yet

  4. #3
    The very first gotra Antal above is antil. Antil Jats are found in sonepat, in hassanpur kurrar village. gujrat was originally named Latt/Latta/... after Latt/Lather jats. Everywhere its mentioned in history as lat n not as Gujrat. It were bud-gujar jats who named it as Gujrat. I met one Desai from Gujrat who said that they are Jats n not morar ji desai wale desai. I confirmed it n found true.

  5. #4
    maitrakas are mitra's the family of sun worshippers. mitra in persian means sun. relate it to a statue of sun god found in beri in 11-12 century ad. they were same as pushya-mitramka or yudhya-mitranka who harassed gupta empire. jats were against jats at that time.

  6. #5
    [quote=lrburdak;111378]GujaratThose who joined agriculture called themselves Garasia Jats and those who continued their ancestral occupation were known as Dhanetah Jats, and those who chose to study the Koran became Fakirani Jats. [http://www.tourmyindia.com/states/gujrat/index.html]

    Laxman ji
    There is also a cast Garasia in Rajasthan .Is there some relation between two?
    Secondly You have mentioned that the jats in Maharastra have moved recently.Is it not possible that they might be living there much earlier than that,may be as earlier as in northwest.I wanted the source of information.

  7. #6
    Jats in Gujarat;

    The article is probably correct that the modern name Gujarat has an association with Gujars, who did dominate/rule the area in the early period of the last millennium.

    However the original name is not rastra, but as has been pointed out- the earlier name was “ Laht “ or Raht”,

    I think the Rathi Jats had originated in the Sindh area too, and their histories in Haryana suggest that they migrated from Rajastan some a few hundred years ago.Ditto for Lat or Lather jats.

    The L and the R being interchangeable.

    Jats have been in area- modern Gujarat, Kutch, Sind, since ancient times,

    The Jats are in Sindh and are found warring with the Muslim invaders in 700 Ad. The rulers appear to be of the Maurya Jats, who were ruling in Sindh.

    There were and are many other Jat goths there at that time.

    The BAL Jats formed the Vallabhipur kingdom, and the founder was a general of the Skandagupta of Dharan Jats 'Guptas' of Magadha.

    His title was ‘Bhattaraka’ meaning leader, which is sometimes confused with, and treated as a personal name.

    How the dynasty was given the suffix’ Maitraka’ is a good question, and probably an error that gets compounded over time, and from textbook to textbook.


    Bappa Rawal the icon of the Rajput community, claimed descent from the Bals of Ballabhipur,and he is said to have gained the throne of Chitor( Jattaur) aftre killimng his maternal Grandfather, who was of the Maurya clan.

    It should be noted that the Mauryas did not dissapearr after Ashoka, but various branches were found in power , down to even the Konkan region in the West Coast of India.

    Garasia is a Jat Goth, found all over North India

    Some took to Islam, and that’s why we find them as Muslims.

    Not because they came from Iran, and went around ‘ grazing’ the animals, and feeding them “ Grass’’

    How then one really asks, what sense it makes, that the Garasia Jats came form Iran 500 years ago, and were herders.

    What we really have that in ancient times this entire area , Maharastra, Gujarat, Sindh, was populated by Jats. The Sakas who invade Sindh, in the late BC period were Jats.

    In time some merged into the Gujars and took on that identity. Some in time also took on a Maharastra, Maratta idendtity.

    Some caution in using information off the internet, without reflection, is advised!

    Putting up a refrence and giving credence to this internet fluff , shoudl be rethought

    The difficulty also is that once such information is given credence by the Jats themsleves, any attempts to correct it, appear as an argument .

    I hope Burdakji corrects his article.

    Caution is advised.


    Ravi Chaudhary
    the future belongs to those who appreciate their past

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/

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  9. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ravichaudhary View Post
    Jats in Gujarat;



    What we really have that in ancient times this entire area , Maharastra, Gujarat, Sindh, was populated by Jats. The Sakas who invade Sindh, in the late BC period were Jats.

    In time some merged into the Gujars and took on that identity. Some in time also took on a Maharastra, Maratta idendtity.




    Ravi Chaudhary

    Ravi ji

    What is the basis of this conclusion?

  10. #8
    The Jats and the Gujars have many common Goths.

    Ditto for Marattas.

    many of the Goths, Chavan, Chauhan, Pawar are common.

    Then look at Goths like Solanki.

    The customs are not all that different either

    see:


    Gujars and Jats - Joon

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/message/1102

    Note the comon Goths

    Ravi Chaudhary
    the future belongs to those who appreciate their past

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/

  11. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by ravichaudhary View Post
    The Jats and the Gujars have many common Goths.

    Ditto for Marattas.

    many of the Goths, Chavan, Chauhan, Pawar are common.

    Then look at Goths like Solanki.

    The customs are not all that different either

    see:


    Gujars and Jats - Joon

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/message/1102

    Note the comon Goths

    Ravi Chaudhary
    True
    But that also suggest the gujjar might have joined the Jat mainstream and evidences points towards that only.

    I just wanted to know whether jats joined gujars or gujars joined jats ,Is there some hint regarding this?

  12. #10
    [QUOTE=narenderkharb;112200]
    Quote Originally Posted by lrburdak View Post
    GujaratThose who joined agriculture called themselves Garasia Jats and those who continued their ancestral occupation were known as Dhanetah Jats, and those who chose to study the Koran became Fakirani Jats. [http://www.tourmyindia.com/states/gujrat/index.html]

    Laxman ji
    There is also a cast Garasia in Rajasthan .Is there some relation between two?
    Secondly You have mentioned that the jats in Maharastra have moved recently.Is it not possible that they might be living there much earlier than that,may be as earlier as in northwest.I wanted the source of information.
    Hi Narenderji,

    The Garasia people are tribes in Rajasthan not considered as Jats. Similarly Gawaria community is also a tribe in Rajasthan but id finds place in Jat gotra list here. We need to go into details from old records to reach to some conclusions. It may be in some areas they joined to tha Jat stream and in others separated from them.

    As regards migration of Jats to Maharashtra the period is given by Mahaveer Singh Verma: Jat Veer Smarika 1992 – “Jat Samaj Ahmedabad”. Infact he is not authority on Jats but when Jat Samaj Gwalior asked to provide an article on Jats in Maharashtra he compiled information and published it. When Mahaveer Singh compiled info he was also surprised about so many Jats in Maharshtra. It was because Jats had no communication and seemed to have been lost in local population as many of them adopted local surnames like Patels etc.

    Raviji is right when he says that we need a cautious approach. It was a starting point and by bringing the facts on line we will get ourselves corrected.

    In my view Jats have been in Maharashtra from ancient times. Area was ruled by Mauryans who were Jats. There must be a good population at that time. The linguistic similarity proves it. It might had happened the the successor rulers took revenge like Pushyamitra a brahman ruler had declared awards, after the fall of Mauryan Empire, to bring the heads of Jats who were followers of Buddhism (RS Joon).

    Kuntal Jats are found in that part of Maharashtra and Malwa region. It has been recorded by Thakur Deshraj in his book. My view is that Kuntals are descendants of Shakuntala whose son Bharat gave name to India. Rishi Kanva had found the newly born girl in the forest surrounded and protected by birds and thus named her Shakuntala. According to a source Titwala, a small town near Kalyan in Maharashtra, is considered to be the site of the hermitage where Shakuntala was born. (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakuntala ). This area, which is near to Nasik is also considred to be the place of origin of Dahiyas as per their gotra history.

    So from the above facts we may conclude that this area of Maharashtra was inhabited by Jats since very ancient times. Needs a deep research

    regards,
    Laxman Burdak

  13. #11
    [quote=lrburdak;112255]
    Quote Originally Posted by narenderkharb View Post



    So from the above facts we may conclude that this area of Maharashtra was inhabited by Jats since very ancient times. Needs a deep research

    regards,
    Thanks for clarification Laxman ji I do believe that jats are here from ancient times.

    Again we have to find out why some groups like Gracia are considered jats in one state and nonjat in other.
    Last edited by narenderkharb; August 16th, 2006 at 10:43 AM.

  14. #12
    Luxmanji

    Part of the problem is that it is, then, we are not clear when you are the author of the article, and when you are not.

    Perhaps you should state that, and when you are not the author, but only the translator, also say so.

    Otherwise, the views of the original author will be ascribed to you.


    On Pushyamitra being Brahmin

    You write:

    "
    In my view Jats have been in Maharastra from ancient times. Area was ruled by Mauryans who were Jats. There must be a good population at that time. The linguistic similarity proves it. It might had happened the successor rulers took revenge like Pushyamitra a Brahman ruler had declared awards, after the fall of Mauryan Empire, to bring the heads of Jats who were followers of Buddhism (RS Joon)."


    Indian history textbooks make these errors often.

    Most of these books were written in the last 100 years.

    The authors were of the 'Brahmin' caste or Kayasths or they supplied the information to the British authors.

    To give themselves positioning, whenever they saw the term Brahmin, they used it in the sense of their 'caste' and ascribed to themselves and their caste the pretensions and glories of ancient old' kingship"


    Thus Pushyamitra was a brahmin, every ruler of any import becomes a Brahmin, -the Jat Sahis of Afghanistan also become Brahmin, and so on.


    The facts are, that the term "Hindu' ids a late term circa 8th/9th century.

    If a term could be used, it could be Brahminism, for that would indicate those who follow" the religion of ' Brahmin' priests'. or 'Brahmins'

    The same error occurs when the Dahir at the time of Quasims' invasion is termed as 'Brahmin', but there is no evidence to show his ' caste'

    We can safely concluded that the Muslim author was referring to the fact, that Dahir followed the ' Brahmin' religion as opposed the " Buddhist' religion' or the 'Jain' religion.

    For if a Brahmin priest was asked, who are you? he would likely say he is 'Brahmin', seeking to give himself an exalted position.. An outsider would that nomenclature of that for the religion too.

    This error get recorded and compounded over time, until now we naturally think of Pushyamitra as of the Brahmin caste, but not simply as following the 'Brahmin'istic religion.

    This stands to sense too, as the religion of Ashoka was Buddhist, his father Chandragupta was Jain, and Pushyamitra came form the Brahmin religion camp.

    When we, as, Jats write about history, it is important that these differentiating nomenclatures be used. other we will also continue to compound the errors.



    Ravi Chaudhary

    Burdakji

    P.S.

    Joon is good for raw material. Please try not to quote him literally!


    Are planning of correcting the Garasia portion?
    the future belongs to those who appreciate their past

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/

  15. #13
    Raviji, I'm surprised to note that Dahir was not necessarilly Brahmin? However, its possible. In south India also we find Salkalayan (who now write Tomer in UP), Kadambas (Kadamb/Kadyanvas) etc. ruling in Andhra nearly about Satvahan's era. I feel same there also that many rulers are just termed Brahmins. Even, Gahlotes of Chittore are sometimes called from Brahmin origin by Smith.
    Last edited by sktewatia; August 17th, 2006 at 07:00 PM.

  16. #14
    Ravi ji, I agree with you in general about this issue.

    Quote Originally Posted by ravichaudhary View Post
    This stands to sense too, as the religion of Ashoka was Buddhist, his father Chandragupta was Jain, and Pushyamitra came form the Brahmin religion camp.
    ?
    You mean his grandfather. I don't know if Bindusara was Buddhist or Jain?

    -vinod
    It may be that universal history is the history of the different intonations given to a handful of metaphors. -J L Borges

  17. #15
    Deegh-Ghott called as Deeghott (means Deegh of Ghotts/Jotts/Jatts) and Gharrott are the two big villages of Bud-Gujjars Jats at Palwal. Similar to Bud-Gujjars are Bud-Gottis at Cheekul village of Bulandshahar. They are Bade/big/Massa Jats like Big/Bade/Massa Gujjars at Palwal.
    Last edited by sktewatia; August 17th, 2006 at 06:54 PM.

  18. #16
    Regarding Jain, Budhism,... etc. initially in my opinion they were just sects. In that region of Bihar there were as many as 62 sects at that time. Budhism and Jainism rose exorbitantly partly due royal patronage of Jats.
    Last edited by sktewatia; August 17th, 2006 at 07:08 PM. Reason: Two successive posts on same topic

  19. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by vinodks View Post
    Ravi ji, I agree with you in general about this issue.



    You mean his grandfather. I don't know if Bindusara was Buddhist or Jain?

    -vinod
    Vinod

    You are correct. Thanks for the correction.

    Actually, one might go a little further, and say that Ashok encouraged Buddhism, but being tolerant did not persecute the followers of other religions.

    About Bindusara's personal religion we know very little.

    For Chandra Gupta (or Gutta,) which I think is the right term,) he retires with Jain Devotees to the South of India, where he passes away.

    In that context, Brahminism does not die out, or become non-existent. It is just that the records of the time do not give it prominence.


    A little off topic, but Chandra Gupta and Co are only described with the epithet 'Shudra', 1,000 years later in Brahminical literature, not earlier.


    That last was to bring in line that current thinking is shaped by current History books.

    The current history books were written by the 'Brahmin' caste, which sought to glorify them. They would describe Chandra Gupt as ' Shudra' for he did not follow their norms, nor support them.

    That does not make it accurate history.

    When the Brahmin adjective is attached to Pushyamitra, Dahir, the Sahi's etc, we should do what we have to do to get it removed, and put into the correct context.

    The best way are to be careful in what descriptions we using.

    The other is, and I cannot emphasize this enough, for people wishing to write articles, put your proposed articles up for review, before you post them.

    Get the corrections done, and then post the reviewed version.

    Let us get it right academically


    Ravi Chaudhary
    the future belongs to those who appreciate their past

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/

  20. #18
    Jats usually are not very strict about religion. Like today they are hindus but not full hindus. They are Arya Samaji's but again Arya Samaj is not a religion but a way of living. Jain and Budhism rather aquired a sort of movement at that time. Chandra Gupta and Asoka encouraged them in public interest. Religion of Bindusara was the usual religion and rights that Jats followed at that time. But certainly he was not following strict Brahminism.
    Last edited by sktewatia; August 17th, 2006 at 07:14 PM.

  21. #19
    Some sources call Bindusara follower of Ajivika, a sect popular at that time... may be not too different from Jainism and Hinduism... Its important to remember that Jainism and Buddhism were reforming sect within Hinduism in the beginning... and bourndaries between these religions became rigid later on....

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajivika

    Ajivika

    Ajivika is an anti-caste philosophy, which literally translates to "following an ascetic way of life". The Ajivikas were contemporaries of the early Buddhists and historical Jains; the Ajivika movement may have preceded both of these groups, but may have been a more loosely organized group of wandering ascetics. Very little concrete information is known about the Ajivikas. Their scriptures and history were not preserved directly- instead, fragments of Ajivika doctrine were preserved in Buddhist and Jain sources, and they are mentioned in several inscriptions from the Mauryan empire. As a result, it is unknown to what degree the available sources reflect the actual beliefs and practices of the Ajivikas; because most of what is known about them was recorded in the literature of rival groups, it is quite possible that accidental distortions or intentional criticism was introduced into the records. Even the name 'Ajivika' may have only been used by observers from outside the tradition

    Some regard Goshala Maskariputra (c. 484 B.C.) as the founder of the Ajivika faith; other sources state that Goshala was a leader of a large Ajivia congregation, but not himself the founder of the movement. Goshala is believed to have been a friend of Mahavira, the founder of Jainism. The Ajivikas believed that transmigration of the human soul was determined by a precise and non-personal cosmic principle called Niyati (destiny) and was completely independent of the person's actions. They are believed to have been strict fatalists, who did not believe in karma or the possibility of free will. The emperor Ashoka's father, Bindusara, was a believer of this philosophy, that reached its peak of popularity during Asoka's lifetime, and then declined into obscurity. The Ajivikasa are thought to have existed in India in the 14th Century, but the exact dates and extent of their influence is unclear. Inscriptions from southern India make reference to the Ajivikas as late as the 13th Century, but by this point in history the term Ajivika may have been used to refer to Jain monks or ascetics from other traditions.

    -vinod
    Last edited by vinodks; August 18th, 2006 at 12:08 AM.
    It may be that universal history is the history of the different intonations given to a handful of metaphors. -J L Borges

  22. #20
    long back there was some rishi. who conducted a lot of research. n there he propounded a religion named as Jat. once these Jats were coined they continued to make other worlds civilized. while at the dawn of history, these jats were yet to make others know what history is and made it till 2day. but unfortunately, these jats are not known in history!!!!!

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