Amritsar

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Harmandir Sahib, Amritsar

Amritsar (Punjabi: ਅੰਮ੍ਰਿਤਸਰ, Hindi: अमृतसर), meaning: The Pool of the Nectar of Immortality, is the administrative headquarter of the Amritsar District in Punjab, India.

Tahsils in Amritsar

Map of Amritsar district

Ajnala

Amritsar -I

Amritsar- II

Baba Bakala

Khadur Sahib

Patti

Tarn Taran

History

The 2001 Indian census reported the population of the city to be over 1,500,000 and that of the entire district to number just over 3,695,077. Amritsar city is one of the major cities of the Punjab state. Under instructions from Guru Amar Das, this city was founded by Guru Ram Das in 1574, on land bought by him for 700 rupees from the owners of the village of Tung.

Amritsar is located in the northwest part of India in the State of Punjab, 32 miles (51 km) east of Lahore, Pakistan. Some have taken the name Amritsar to derive Amŗit-sarovar meaning "The Pool of the Nectar of Immortality" though -sar, "Natural pool" does not derive from sarovar, "Artificial tank or body of water".

It is home to the Harimandir Sahib, also known as the Golden Temple, and is the spiritual and cultural centre of the Sikh religion.

Jat clans in Amritsar

Jat Sikh Clans and Their Population in Selective Districts of Punjab Handbooks [1] [2] [3] prepared by British military officers for the recruitment of Sikhs into the British Indian Army contain information on the location of Jat clans and their respective population in various districts of Punjab. Therefore, this section (basically based on these documents) presents various Jat clans and their respective population projected by B S Dhillon. [4]


  • Sandhu (67,158): This is probably the strongest clan of the district and holds 121 villages [7]. Their strongest concentration is in the south-west corner of Tarn-Taran area, here, Sandhus hold 32 villages [5].
  • Gill (48,210): This clan holds 142 villages [5] in total and specifically its large concentration is in the Tarn Taran area where it holds about 25 villages.
  • Dhillon (44,202): This clan as per Captain Falcon [6] holds 140 villages in the district. Some of the Dhillons' villages are Kasel, Dhand, Chabal, Kairon, Padri, Gaggobua, Panjwar, Lijan, and Gandiwind.
  • Randhawa (42,480): This clan owns 116 villages [7] and its main strength is in along the Batala border and around Mahta village in the area close to the Amritsar city.
  • Aulak (17,841): It is mostly to be found in the area around the town of Ajnala and around the village of Shabazpur in Tarn-Tarn sub-district where the clan owns a cluster of 9 villages.
  • Sidhu (26,739): This clan around Atari and Bhakna villages holds 14 villages.
  • Chahil (13,527): This clan owns 16 villages near the Sheron Bagha village.
  • Bal (17,934): This clan holds a total of 23 villages, for example, Bal Khurad, Bal Kalan, Bal Serai and Jodhe.
  • Pannun (14,196): This clan appears to have spread from the Doaba area of the modern Punjab and owns 7 large villages including Naushera and Chaudriwala.
  • Bhangu (3,978): This clan holds the large village of Khiala (Khurd and Kalan). The Legendry Mehtab Singh of the Sikhs and I think, General Shubeg Singh of the recent times belonged to this very clan.
  • Kang (6,159): This clan holds a cluster of villages in the Tarn-Taran area including Kang, Mal Chak and Kalla.
  • Other Jat clans - Bhullar (7,113), Dhaun (22,710), Mahil (7,020), Sadal (7,515), Mann (5,577), Sarai (5,574), Kara, (5,355), Chhina (5,838), Bhat (4,698), Boparae (3,651), Sakuni (3,816), Opal (3,044), Kaler (4,632), Hinjra (4,689), Johal (4,593), Her (3,441), Chimma (3,207), Dhanoa (3,360), Sohal (3,864), Valia (2,868), Soi (2,697), Bajwa (2,874), Athwal (2,067), Bandar (2,316), Bhatti (1,509), Batth (1,653), Bhoi (1,545), Des (1,239), Dhariwal (2,640), Ghumman (372), Garaia (1,203), Hundal (963), Jawara (1,953), Khara (2,025), Khera (1,698), Nijjar (2,223), Ojla (2,583), Rai (2,364), Sagwan (1,503), Sansi (2,046), Sumra (1,038), Virk (2,037), and Varaich (2,070).[8]

Muslim Jat clans in Amritsar District

According to 1911 census, the following were the principal Muslim Jat clans in Amritsar District [9]:

Aulakh (674), Bajwa (377), Bal (51), Bhangu (37), Bhullar (61), Chahal (91), Chadhar (166), Chhina (739), Cheema (137), Deo (237), Dhariwal (348), Dhillon (2,298), Ghumman (477), Gill (4,346), Goraya (412), Heer (74), Hanjra (142), Hundal (230), Kahlon (390), Kang (97), Mahil (38), Maan (95), Pannun (91), Randhawa (2,661), Sarai (171), Sidhu (879), Sandhu (2,054), Sohal (218), Samra (53), Virk (325) and, Waraich (492).

External Links

References

  1. Barstow, A.E. (Major), The Sikhs: An Ethnology, reprinted by B.R. Publishing Corporation, Delhi, India, 1985, pp. 105-135.
  2. Bingley, A.H. (Captain), Handbooks for the Indian Army: Sikhs, compiled under the orders of the Government of India, Printed at the Government Central Printing Office, Simla, India, 1899, pp. 29-37.
  3. Falcon, R.W. (Captain), Handbook on Sikhs for the Use of Regimental Officers, Printed at the Pioneer Press, Allahabad, India, 1896, pp. 81-103.
  4. History and study of the Jats. By Professor B.S Dhillon. ISBN-10: 1895603021 or ISBN-13: 978-1895603026. 123
  5. Falcon, R.W. (Captain), Handbook on Sikhs for the Use of Regimental Officers, Printed at the Pioneer Press, Allahabad, India, 1896, pp. 81-103.
  6. Falcon, R.W. (Captain), Handbook on Sikhs for the Use of Regimental Officers, Printed at the Pioneer Press, Allahabad, India, 1896, pp. 81-103.
  7. Falcon, R.W. (Captain), Handbook on Sikhs for the Use of Regimental Officers, Printed at the Pioneer Press, Allahabad, India, 1896, pp. 81-103.
  8. History and study of the Jats. By Professor B.S Dhillon. ISBN-10: 1895603021 or ISBN-13: 978-1895603026. p. 124
  9. Census Of India 1911 Volume xiv Punjab Part 2 by Pandit Narikishan Kaul

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