Mandi Muzaffarnagar

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Mandi (मंडी) (also spelt as Maadhi) is a village in Muzaffarnagar tahsil in Muzaffarnagar district in Uttar Pradesh. Mandi is an archaeological site of the Indus Valley Civilization.

Location

History

Site of the Indus Valley Civilization

It is notable for the discovery and looting of an ancient treasure trove by villagers in June 2000. The treasure is believed to have been from the Indus Valley Civilisation period. It is known as "Mandi treasure" or "Mandy hoard". In June 2000, three women villagers uncovered a copper urn containing gold ornaments, while scraping mud from the mound. By the night, most of the 4,000 villagers had crowded around the plot, digging and fighting for treasure.[1]

The police arrived at around 10 pm. According to a villager Mahinder Singh, the police asked his son to Somi Singh to continue the digging. Somi Singh allegedly unearthed 35 kg of gold pieces and a golden scabbard of a dagger, but was later arrested on the frivolous charges. According to the official records, only 10 kg of treasure was recovered by the district authorities. The authorities estimate that the villagers had uncovered around 500 kg of treasure. They offered the villagers double the market price for the ornaments. However, most of the treasure was sold to the local traders, who melted it.[2][3]

According to the experts from ASI and the Uttar Pradesh Department of Archaeology , the jewelry belonged to the Late Harappan period. It resembled the jewelry found at Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) sites such as Harappa, Mohenjo-daro, Lothal, Rakhigarhi and Dholavira in India.[4][5]

The list of artifacts recovered by the district authorities includes:[6] Banded Agate (Black & White Bands)- Bead, Banded Agate (Black & White Bands)- Bead, Copper incrustation pieces, Copper Pot (Circular) - Upper Part Partially Broken, Copper Pot (Rectangular), Gold Bead Joint, Gold Bead Joint, Gold Very fragile bead of foil, with few foil pieces, Gold Conical-shaped beads, Gold Conical-shaped beads, Gold End Terminal, Gold End Terminal, Gold Five thin disc beads joined together with an unidentified bead, Gold Cylindrical foil, Gold Spacer, Gold Thin Disc Bead, Semi-precious stone with multi-color bands Bead (Type-1), Semi-precious stone with multi-color bands Bead (Type-1), Semi-precious stone with multi-color bands Bead (Type-2), Semi-precious stone with multi-color bands Bead (Type-2), Semi-precious stone with multi-color bands Bead (Type-3), Semi-precious stone with multi-color bands Bead (Type-3), Semi-precious stone with multi-color bands Broken bead pieces, Silver Roughly half of a large hollow kara (bracelet), Silver Broken pieces of a large hollow kara (bracelet), Unidentified Beads,

Jat Gotras

History

Notable persons

External links

References

  1. Michael Fathers (2000-07-10). "Stealing from History". TIME Asia 156 (1).
  2. Michael Fathers (2000-07-10). "Stealing from History". TIME Asia 156 (1).
  3. Manoher V. Sonalker (1 January 2007). India: The Giant Awakens!. Atlantic Publishers & Dist. p. 157. ISBN 978-81-269-0769-4.
  4. Maneesh Kumar (2010-10-10). "Harappan Jewelry". Archaeology (Archaeological Institute of America).
  5. Randall William Law (II.) (2008). Inter-regional Interaction and Urbanism in the Ancient Indus Valley: A Geologic Provenience Study of Harappa's Rock and Mineral Assemblage. ProQuest. pp. 146–. ISBN 978-0-549-62879-8.
  6. "Mandi Village Treasure". Muzaffarnagar District Administration Site

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