Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Fashionable women in Indian History.

  1. #1

    Fashionable women in Indian History.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fashion women history.jpg 
Views:	583 
Size:	102.6 KB 
ID:	16758

    (Photo: Personal Collection. Source: National Museum, New Delhi)

    The above sculpture is of Queen Kelachchhadevi of Alwar (Rajasthan). This is a 12th century sculpture of the queen standing besides her husband (the king). In terms of the prevalent Indian fashion then, a knee length skirt with a short blouse (tight fitting) with no head covering veil, is noticed. As far as hair is concerner, women preferred to keep long hair (instead of short - we see that fashion of short hair in sanch stupa sculptures), neatly tied in a bun. The use of forehead bindi as a beautification idea had started as seen on the forehead of the queen. Fashionably acceptable hair parting was a centre parting of hair. People preferred to be without shoes whenever possible (No shoes on the king and queen).

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    annch (September 24th, 2013), DrRajpalSingh (August 12th, 2013), lrburdak (August 12th, 2013), rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013), sivach (August 14th, 2013)

  3. #2
    Regarding whether women kept short hair as a fashion symbol, it is my observation that in general, long hair was fashionable (almost all sculptures and photos that i have seen show women with long hair). However, i came across this beautiful photo of Sanchi Stupa sculpture where the woman is shown with short, fashionably styled hair (2nd century B.C.E).

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	sanchi 1.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	99.7 KB 
ID:	16759

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    annch (September 24th, 2013), DrRajpalSingh (August 12th, 2013), lrburdak (August 12th, 2013), rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013)

  5. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by urmiladuhan View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	fashion women history.jpg 
Views:	583 
Size:	102.6 KB 
ID:	16758

    (Photo: Personal Collection. Source: National Museum, New Delhi)

    The above sculpture is of Queen Kelachchhadevi of Alwar (Rajasthan). This is a 12th century sculpture of the queen standing besides her husband (the king). In terms of the prevalent Indian fashion then, a knee length skirt with a short blouse (tight fitting) with no head covering veil, is noticed. As far as hair is concerner, women preferred to keep long hair (instead of short - we see that fashion of short hair in sanch stupa sculptures), neatly tied in a bun. The use of forehead bindi as a beautification idea had started as seen on the forehead of the queen. Fashionably acceptable hair parting was a centre parting of hair. People preferred to be without shoes whenever possible (No shoes on the king and queen).
    But, long time back, King Kanishka is shown wearing shoes in Mathura headless sculpture !
    History is best when created, better when re-constructed and worst when invented.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to DrRajpalSingh For This Useful Post:

    rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013)

  7. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRajpalSingh View Post
    But, long time back, King Kanishka is shown wearing shoes in Mathura headless sculpture !
    That is true. Even Surya is shown wearing shoes, and no other deity. When I asked the reason behind Surya shown wearing shoes, I was told (I am sure this is quite laughable) so that his intense rays could be dimmed. . As if the intensity part of the sun lies in his feet! I did not believe that the explanation was true. I think, perhaps the concept of Sun God is not Indian per say. As per brahminical traditions, people don't wear shoes even when entering a temple and so that a God is shown wearing shoes does not seem to be an Indian concept, I think. I shall post a sculpture photo of Surya soon.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    lrburdak (August 12th, 2013), rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013)

  9. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by urmiladuhan View Post
    That is true. Even Surya is shown wearing shoes, and no other deity. When I asked the reason behind Surya shown wearing shoes, I was told (I am sure this is quite laughable) so that his intense rays could be dimmed. . As if the intensity part of the sun lies in his feet! I did not believe that the explanation was true. I think, perhaps the concept of Sun God is not Indian per say. As per brahminical traditions, people don't wear shoes even when entering a temple and so that a God is shown wearing shoes does not seem to be an Indian concept, I think. I shall post a sculpture photo of Surya soon.

    Surya shown wearing long boots.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	surya.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	98.6 KB 
ID:	16760

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013)

  11. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRajpalSingh View Post
    But, long time back, King Kanishka is shown wearing shoes in Mathura headless sculpture !
    Dr. Rajpal, here we are talking specifically about women fashion. Have you ever seen a women wearing shoes in sculptures before say 13th century C.E? Sculpture making being an expensive undertaking, it was affordable either by the royals or otherwise wealthy class of people (especially stone sculptures. terracotta is a different ball game - but even here, having an artist make terracotta figures cost money). Perhaps, the working class of people wore shoes. But when it comes to showing fashion, as it is nowadays, the wealthy decide what is fashionable and are harbingers of fashion. Wealthy class of women stayed indoors mostly and are not wearing shoes (in general).
    Last edited by urmiladuhan; August 12th, 2013 at 08:47 AM. Reason: added information.

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    lrburdak (August 12th, 2013), rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013)

  13. #7
    The following terracotta tablet shows working class women. This is from Sunga period (2nd century B.C.E). Working class women is shown wearing a long skirt (like lehnga) with a short but sleeved blouse (half sleeves ?). no head covering veil is shown. unlike today, women in rural areas did not cover their heads, let alone face! Another women is shown wearing a long cloth wrapped around as a knee length skirt and wearing a blouse. this was the fashion of women in 2nd century B.C.E.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	sunga.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	104.2 KB 
ID:	16764





    Attachment 16761
    Last edited by urmiladuhan; August 12th, 2013 at 12:51 PM. Reason: to load photo

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013)

  15. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRajpalSingh View Post
    But, long time back, King Kanishka is shown wearing shoes in Mathura headless sculpture !
    Kanishka is known as a Kushana King. Kushanas are believed to have come to India from cold climate region of the north. that is why they are shown wearing long coats and high boots (cold climate dress), besides the fact that they were warriors and needed to keep themselves well protected from various elements.

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    rajpaldular (September 25th, 2013)

  17. #9
    Empress Nur Jehan, the wife of emperor Jahangir (1605-1627),

    has been said to be a fashionable lady especially she was an

    ardent lover of scent and provided all help to the artisans who

    were engaged in preparation of it.
    History is best when created, better when re-constructed and worst when invented.

  18. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to DrRajpalSingh For This Useful Post:

    annch (September 24th, 2013), ndalal (September 25th, 2013), singhvp (October 5th, 2013), urmiladuhan (September 24th, 2013)

  19. #10
    The ladies in harem of the Mughals and those belonging to Mansabdar families

    used to go to markets in Agra and Delhi to enjoy shopping items of their

    choicest fashion. Since their number seems to be large special shopping

    complexes to cater to their needs came into existence, These shops catering

    to the needs of this elite group were run exclusively by the women and these

    special markets were known as MEENA Bazaar in those days.
    History is best when created, better when re-constructed and worst when invented.

  20. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DrRajpalSingh For This Useful Post:

    annch (September 24th, 2013), singhvp (October 5th, 2013)

  21. #11
    very informative slide show on the subject;

    http://www.slideshare.net/guestc4f82...indian-fashion

    RK^2
    There are many paths leading to God, politics is certainly not one of them...

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to rkumar For This Useful Post:

    urmiladuhan (October 12th, 2013)

  23. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by urmiladuhan View Post
    Regarding whether women kept short hair as a fashion symbol, it is my observation that in general, long hair was fashionable (almost all sculptures and photos that i have seen show women with long hair). However, i came across this beautiful photo of Sanchi Stupa sculpture where the woman is shown with short, fashionably styled hair (2nd century B.C.E).

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	sanchi 1.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	99.7 KB 
ID:	16759
    Doesn't it compare so well with the hair style of Cleopatra who also ruled Egypt around the same time.

    https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...6%3B840%3B1000

    RK^2
    There are many paths leading to God, politics is certainly not one of them...

  24. The Following User Says Thank You to rkumar For This Useful Post:

    urmiladuhan (October 12th, 2013)

  25. #13
    a very unusual woman's anklet design seen on sculpture from mathura region. here we see anklet in the form of multiple strings with hanging design on one side of the strings.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	anklet.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	95.5 KB 
ID:	16885
    Attention seekers and attention getters are two different class of people.

  26. The Following User Says Thank You to urmiladuhan For This Useful Post:

    rekhasmriti (October 12th, 2013)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •