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Thread: Jats & Maharatas - Guru Ramarth Das

  1. #1

    Jats & Maharatas - Guru Ramarth Das

    For an alternative view of the battle of Panipat.

    XXXX

    Sant Ramdas was the Guru of Shivaji, and was responsible to a large extent for inculcating in Shivaji, a love for a Hindustan free of the Mussalman.

    What is not so commonly known is the role of the Guru, in the development of the resistance movement in North India, particularly UP, and Haryana.

    At the time of Aurangzeb, a rebellion broke out, known as the Jat rebellion. The role the Guru played is quite significant.

    The Guru through sermons and discourses raised the sprit of the people, and encouraged them to throw off the Mogul yoke. In this he had the support of the Governing Council of the Haryana Sarv Khap, the governing council of the what one, may call the republic or Ganapada, (which stretched from the Sutlej, to the Chambal River, incorporating, East Punjab, Haryana, and western UP).

    In a sermon, in the Muzzafarpur (UP) area, after a havan, young men, led by Gokula, accepted the exhortation and challenge of the Guru to devote and sacrifice their lives for the motherland. The vows were taken, with a sip of water from the Ganga, and the Yamuna, and the chewing of a pipal leaf. The rest in any conventional history book - The stopping of cow killing in the local temples, the defeat and removal of local Muslim officials, the battles, the eventual capture and decapitation piece by piece of this freedom fighter, followed by the revenge, the pogroms, against the people of the Braj.

    After Guru Ramdas, relationship building between the Sarv Khap and the Maharattas continued.

    Pundit Kanha Ram, who was an adviser to the Council, and also a recorder of the history as it occurred, visited the Pune Court a number of times.

    At the time of the Panipat battle, Pundit Kanha Ram wrote a record of the events, of which he was a contemporary.

    This record had previously been unknown, and has come to light in recent decades, and a copy was translated into English by Prof Bal Kisen Dabas, a historian with Shivaji college, Delhi, and is part of his book ‘Political and Social History of the Jats’, which covers the medieval period. from Aurangzeb, to the Maharattas, and depicts in some detail the administration of the affairs of the Ganapada- the Sarv Khap of Haryana.

    The Khap ran its affairs separately, in parallel to the rulers at Delhi, and more often than not in conflict with them. The historical record of the of the Ganapada or Khap goes back to the time of Harsha Vardhan Virk of Kanauj, whom the Khap coronated as King, in Chaitya (March - April) VS 606.

    After the death of Dattaji at Sukartal, the Maharattas swore revenge, and Sada Shiv Bhau was sent north with a large army, and over 200 Cannon, to destroy Abdali. The Jats, following their Khap Panchayat, direction, supported and fought alongside the Maharattas in this period.

    The Bhau among other communications wrote a letter, asking all Hindus, and the Sarv Khap for assistance in men and material to throw out the Muslim invader. The original is still in the Panchayat records.

    It may noted separately, that there was some tension between the Maharattas and the northern rulers, caused by the desire for supremacy by the Maharattas, who sought to subjugate all the north and bring it under their rule. The harsh policies of the Maharattas may be dealt with elsewhere. As the Maharatta power came north it ran into conflict, with the northern people- excessive taxes were demanded, and much land was laid waste. The Maharaats came into conflict with the Bharatput state, ruled by Surajmal.


    Intermediaries, Holkar, persuaded Surajmal, that if he joined with the Maharattas, he would not be betrayed.

    At this time differences were put apart.

    The Sarv Khap, of Haryana gave its support to Surajmull, and appointed him as the leader, as was the custom, at times of external threats like these to choose one leader. The Khap, contributed an army 25,000 troops, led by Sohal, a general chosen by the Panchayat.

    On reaching Delhi, the Bhau, called a meeting, and representative of the entire Coalition gathered. Pundit Kanha Ram was present too.

    At the meeting, Surajmull suggested that the way to deal with Abdali was to resort to Guerilla Warfare, at which the Jats excelled, and not to meet Abdali head on. He also suggested that no Muslim place of worship be desecrated. And the Muslims were not to be trusted, as they would all support Abdali. He suggested that all heavy material, Guns, should be left at a central place, all women and Children, retainers, should be kept at Delhi or Bharatpur. Behind Abdali, he suggested that a scorched earth policy be followed to deprive Abdali of food and grain.


    Surajmull, asked the Maharattas not to desecrate the silver ceiling in Delhi fort, offering to pay Res 5 lacs instead. The Maharattas ignored that, destroyed the silver ceiling and distributed it among their camp followers.

    The Bhau and his retainers ignored this advice, and Surajmull and the Raja of Indore were humiliated. Of Surajmull it was said, “ what could a peasant know of war” and of the Raja of Indore,’ what could a herder know of war” The Moguls of the Delhi Court were humiliated, and insulted. Ibrahim Gardi, the general of Artillery of the Bhau, boasted that Abdali's troops would be roasted before his cannon liked 'Chana '(chick peas) or Gram. A holi would be played with the enemy.

    The Maharattas also decided to capture Surajmull. On receiving this news, Surajmull with his troops, slipped away, before the Maharattas could capture him.

    The Rajput rulers of Rajastan send word to Abdali, that they would not be supporting the Bhau, and would not join battle on his side.

    Then ponderous army of the Maharattas moved forward, without adequate food or water. Abdali was able to fight a mobile battle.

    In the initial stages the battle went well for the coalition. Abdali could not break through the Jats. On the Maharatta flank, a shell exploded near the howdah of Bhisa Rao, who was mortally wounded. Ibrahim Gardi was wounded with three bullets, and withdrew to the rear. The Bhau, called away to see his nephew, ignored the pleas of his staff to attend to the battle. As he left, he came across his women, who were wandering, having escaped from their camp, which had been attacked and razed by Abdali’s’ troops. He sent off his guard to try and save the women. He went to be with his nephew, who breathed his last. The Bhau lost control of the battle. The Maharattas lost heart, and Abdali broke through their ranks, and snatched victory from the jaws of defeat. The Jat allies could not survive on their own and were massacred.

    Such are the vagaries of War.

    One by one the Maharattas escaped a best as they could. Near Muzzarfarnagar, a number of the ladies, including the Bhau’s wife of were given succor and shelter for the next six months. They were then sent to Pune. The Sarv Khap, and Surajmal in Bharatpur provided medicine, food and shelter to the defeated.

    What about the Bhau? According to the Pundit Kanha Ram, the Bhau never returned to Maharastra, but went underground in Haryana and lived out his days there, incognito, going from place of worship to place of worship. He died when he was 119 years old.

    The history on India, one more time took a different route.

    The causes were not superstition or the horse (e.g. an astrologer suggesting attacking after nine months). but arrogance, a refusal to accommodate others, and accept that the people did not wish to exchange a Muslim yoke for the heel of the Maharatta and simple awful luck.

    Ravi
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/

    PS:

    As an aside the warfare schools of the Jat Khap were renowned. Guru Ramdas arranged for a number of Mulls (warriors) to go the Shivaji, to train his troops, in warfare, particularly guerilla warfare.

    There is also a letter form Dev Rana the ruler of Vijayanagar, asking for a number of Mull Yodhas (as they were known) from the Khap to be sent his to court, so they can train his soldiers, to be able to remove the pestilence of the Mussalman. A number were sent to Vijayanagar, where the imparted training to the Rana’s troops.


    These are historical documents, hitherto not well known, which throw a very different light on the history of India.

  2. #2
    raviji ,its very good know this information and i am sure many more ppl on jatland will start taking interest in jat history.keep it up

    recently i read somewhere that bahu died in sanghi village in rohtak distt. and his tomb still exists there.

  3. #3
    That is very interesting.

    Could you or someone else provide some information.

    Where is sangi

    Any inscripion on the Tomb.

    Why a Tomb
    Why would he not be cremated.

    Could someone take a photograph of the tomb, and any inscrition on it, scan it and send me by E mail.

    Do the Bhats of the area have any information


    Ravi

  4. #4
    Ravi ji , i regert the delayed reply. infact i could not trace the particular information from about a dozen of books on jat history which i possess and keep on reading on and off and this piece of information came from there only.

    now it is confirmed that bhau came to sanghi and he was given protection against all odds by Hooda jats of sanghi.he stayed in sanghi as a sadhu and its clear from this that till date there is a monument in his memory as a temple .and every year there is mela on his samadhi.the word tomb was a misnomer and its a smadhi .i have requested a friend from sanghi to give the photograph of the monument and he has assured me that, when ever i get those i will send those to you .

  5. #5
    Could we we get more details,

    Which dates is the Mela held, what is the attendance, what happens at the Mela, and of course photographs- Digital ones would be very nice

    This will make a wonderful story, maybe one of Journalist friends - Ruchi ?? could do a writeup

    Ravi

  6. #6
    Raviji, Thats nice piece though I had read it in the book mentioned. Its example of archived posts which could be easily turned into short formal article. There are several such posts in yahoogroup and here and it would require huge amount of effort to reformat them but in the end it would produce vast amount of references. Does anyone want to help in doing chores?

    -vinod


    Quote Originally Posted by ravichaudhary View Post
    For an alternative view of the battle of Panipat.

    XXXX

    Sant Ramdas was the Guru of Shivaji, and was responsible to a large extent for inculcating in Shivaji, a love for a Hindustan free of the Mussalman.

    What is not so commonly known is the role of the Guru, in the development of the resistance movement in North India, particularly UP, and Haryana.

    At the time of Aurangzeb, a rebellion broke out, known as the Jat rebellion. The role the Guru played is quite significant.

    The Guru through sermons and discourses raised the sprit of the people, and encouraged them to throw off the Mogul yoke. In this he had the support of the Governing Council of the Haryana Sarv Khap, the governing council of the what one, may call the republic or Ganapada, (which stretched from the Sutlej, to the Chambal River, incorporating, East Punjab, Haryana, and western UP).

    In a sermon, in the Muzzafarpur (UP) area, after a havan, young men, led by Gokula, accepted the exhortation and challenge of the Guru to devote and sacrifice their lives for the motherland. The vows were taken, with a sip of water from the Ganga, and the Yamuna, and the chewing of a pipal leaf. The rest in any conventional history book - The stopping of cow killing in the local temples, the defeat and removal of local Muslim officials, the battles, the eventual capture and decapitation piece by piece of this freedom fighter, followed by the revenge, the pogroms, against the people of the Braj.

    After Guru Ramdas, relationship building between the Sarv Khap and the Maharattas continued.

    Pundit Kanha Ram, who was an adviser to the Council, and also a recorder of the history as it occurred, visited the Pune Court a number of times.

    At the time of the Panipat battle, Pundit Kanha Ram wrote a record of the events, of which he was a contemporary.

    This record had previously been unknown, and has come to light in recent decades, and a copy was translated into English by Prof Bal Kisen Dabas, a historian with Shivaji college, Delhi, and is part of his book ‘Political and Social History of the Jats’, which covers the medieval period. from Aurangzeb, to the Maharattas, and depicts in some detail the administration of the affairs of the Ganapada- the Sarv Khap of Haryana.

    The Khap ran its affairs separately, in parallel to the rulers at Delhi, and more often than not in conflict with them. The historical record of the of the Ganapada or Khap goes back to the time of Harsha Vardhan Virk of Kanauj, whom the Khap coronated as King, in Chaitya (March - April) VS 606.

    After the death of Dattaji at Sukartal, the Maharattas swore revenge, and Sada Shiv Bhau was sent north with a large army, and over 200 Cannon, to destroy Abdali. The Jats, following their Khap Panchayat, direction, supported and fought alongside the Maharattas in this period.

    The Bhau among other communications wrote a letter, asking all Hindus, and the Sarv Khap for assistance in men and material to throw out the Muslim invader. The original is still in the Panchayat records.

    It may noted separately, that there was some tension between the Maharattas and the northern rulers, caused by the desire for supremacy by the Maharattas, who sought to subjugate all the north and bring it under their rule. The harsh policies of the Maharattas may be dealt with elsewhere. As the Maharatta power came north it ran into conflict, with the northern people- excessive taxes were demanded, and much land was laid waste. The Maharaats came into conflict with the Bharatput state, ruled by Surajmal.


    Intermediaries, Holkar, persuaded Surajmal, that if he joined with the Maharattas, he would not be betrayed.

    At this time differences were put apart.

    The Sarv Khap, of Haryana gave its support to Surajmull, and appointed him as the leader, as was the custom, at times of external threats like these to choose one leader. The Khap, contributed an army 25,000 troops, led by Sohal, a general chosen by the Panchayat.

    On reaching Delhi, the Bhau, called a meeting, and representative of the entire Coalition gathered. Pundit Kanha Ram was present too.

    At the meeting, Surajmull suggested that the way to deal with Abdali was to resort to Guerilla Warfare, at which the Jats excelled, and not to meet Abdali head on. He also suggested that no Muslim place of worship be desecrated. And the Muslims were not to be trusted, as they would all support Abdali. He suggested that all heavy material, Guns, should be left at a central place, all women and Children, retainers, should be kept at Delhi or Bharatpur. Behind Abdali, he suggested that a scorched earth policy be followed to deprive Abdali of food and grain.


    Surajmull, asked the Maharattas not to desecrate the silver ceiling in Delhi fort, offering to pay Res 5 lacs instead. The Maharattas ignored that, destroyed the silver ceiling and distributed it among their camp followers.

    The Bhau and his retainers ignored this advice, and Surajmull and the Raja of Indore were humiliated. Of Surajmull it was said, “ what could a peasant know of war” and of the Raja of Indore,’ what could a herder know of war” The Moguls of the Delhi Court were humiliated, and insulted. Ibrahim Gardi, the general of Artillery of the Bhau, boasted that Abdali's troops would be roasted before his cannon liked 'Chana '(chick peas) or Gram. A holi would be played with the enemy.

    The Maharattas also decided to capture Surajmull. On receiving this news, Surajmull with his troops, slipped away, before the Maharattas could capture him.

    The Rajput rulers of Rajastan send word to Abdali, that they would not be supporting the Bhau, and would not join battle on his side.

    Then ponderous army of the Maharattas moved forward, without adequate food or water. Abdali was able to fight a mobile battle.

    In the initial stages the battle went well for the coalition. Abdali could not break through the Jats. On the Maharatta flank, a shell exploded near the howdah of Bhisa Rao, who was mortally wounded. Ibrahim Gardi was wounded with three bullets, and withdrew to the rear. The Bhau, called away to see his nephew, ignored the pleas of his staff to attend to the battle. As he left, he came across his women, who were wandering, having escaped from their camp, which had been attacked and razed by Abdali’s’ troops. He sent off his guard to try and save the women. He went to be with his nephew, who breathed his last. The Bhau lost control of the battle. The Maharattas lost heart, and Abdali broke through their ranks, and snatched victory from the jaws of defeat. The Jat allies could not survive on their own and were massacred.

    Such are the vagaries of War.

    One by one the Maharattas escaped a best as they could. Near Muzzarfarnagar, a number of the ladies, including the Bhau’s wife of were given succor and shelter for the next six months. They were then sent to Pune. The Sarv Khap, and Surajmal in Bharatpur provided medicine, food and shelter to the defeated.

    What about the Bhau? According to the Pundit Kanha Ram, the Bhau never returned to Maharastra, but went underground in Haryana and lived out his days there, incognito, going from place of worship to place of worship. He died when he was 119 years old.

    The history on India, one more time took a different route.

    The causes were not superstition or the horse (e.g. an astrologer suggesting attacking after nine months). but arrogance, a refusal to accommodate others, and accept that the people did not wish to exchange a Muslim yoke for the heel of the Maharatta and simple awful luck.

    Ravi
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JatHistory/

    PS:

    As an aside the warfare schools of the Jat Khap were renowned. Guru Ramdas arranged for a number of Mulls (warriors) to go the Shivaji, to train his troops, in warfare, particularly guerilla warfare.

    There is also a letter form Dev Rana the ruler of Vijayanagar, asking for a number of Mull Yodhas (as they were known) from the Khap to be sent his to court, so they can train his soldiers, to be able to remove the pestilence of the Mussalman. A number were sent to Vijayanagar, where the imparted training to the Rana’s troops.


    These are historical documents, hitherto not well known, which throw a very different light on the history of India.

  7. #7
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    good work really.

    Mahratha said, I suppose "Pahle is Mulle (Abdali) ko dekh lun, phir is Jatt (Surajmal) ko bhi dekhunga". Surajmal knew that this Maratha is harbouring the desire to enslave the Jat kingdom. So, he stayed aside!

    But, Raviji, nowadays, CM of Rajasthan is Maratha, Rajput or Jat???????????

  8. #8
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    Raviji and Tewatiaji,

    Good information. Wikipedia has also some articles on Maratha people and warfares. At times they are mentioning about Jats also but they mention names in different format some of them I have edited and linked to Jat history pages. I will find and put some contents also.

    In Jat language "Jat ke ghar aai jatni kahlai" जाट के घर आई जाटनी कहलाई can indicate that Rajasthan CM is Jatni. But you can not confine her to a single caste. They have relations in all castes, namely Rajputs, Jats, Maratha, Gujars.

    Regards,
    Laxman Burdak

  9. #9
    I think this is not a question of caste. This is just like having royal relations and were followed in ancient Bharat as well. just like Prince use to marry a Princess of other kingdom and caste doesn't comes in between. As we can see they had relations with king of Nepal, Bharatpur etc.

    If we see the history I think caste and rules are made for poorer and middle class as for
    Rich there is no caste eg. Indra Feroz Gandhi, Sachin Pilot etc.
    Last edited by mann123; October 16th, 2006 at 07:18 AM.
    -Virender M.

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