Bangi

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Bangi (बंगी)/(बांगी)[1] [2] is a Jat clan. Bangi clan is found in Afghanistan.[3] Bangash (बंगश),Bangakh (बंगख), Bangat, Bankat are same and branch of Chauhan and of Jata descent. [4]

Origin

H. W. Bellew [5] considers Bangash (or Bangakh, as pronounced by the hill Pathan,) may stand for Bangat, or Bankat, Chohan Rajput. Or the Bangash may be a branch of the Bangi division of the Khattak to be next noticed, and of the same stock as the Bangi division of the Sikh nation, and of Jata descent.

History

H. W. Bellew [6]The Bangash tribe inhabits the plains of Kuram, Miranzai, and Kohat, from the Peohar or Pewar ridge in the west, to the Khattak border on the east, all which tract is called Bangash by the name of the tribe. The Bangash are reckoned at ten thousand families, of which number two thousand are in Kuram (beyond the British border), where they are dependents of the Turi. In Kuram every Bangash is obliged to attach himself as hamsdyah or "vassal," to some Turi lord, who protects him against any other Turi, and is styled his naik or nayic, or " protector, patron." The Turi nayik furnishes his Bangash hamsdyah with a passport or escort when moving from one part of the district to another, claims his service in war or faction fights, and has a right to his estate in default of a direct Bangash heir.

According to native accounts, the Bangash came originally from Sistan, and settled in Gardez district of Ghazni, where they were


[Page-105] converted to Islam in the last quarter of the ninth century, during the reign of Sultan Ismail Samani, whose name they are supposed to have adopted as their Muhammadan patronymic; though more probably they got that over-name as belonging to the sect of Ismaili, called Mulahida by orthodox Musalmans, which was founded by Hasan Sabah in Persia in 1099-1100 A.D., and exterminated by Holaku Khan in 1266 A.D. The Ismaili, Mulahida, or " Assassins," to escape destruction, fled in large numbers into Afghanistan. It is not clear which Sistan they came from : whether from the province on the Helmand bearing that modern name (Sistan, the Sajistan of Arab writers, who took the name they found, viz., Sakastan, or " country of the Saka), or from the province bordering on the Bolan Pass, the modern Sibi (Siwistan ; or Shivasthan of the Indians). But, be this as it may, they were expelled from Gardez after some five hundred years of settlement there by the Ghilzi, and drifting eastward towards the Indus gradually, about four hundred years ago, possessed themselves of the Miranzai and Kohat plains, whence, with the aid of the Khattak of Tiri, they drove the Orakzi inhabitants into the Tirah hills where we now find them, as before described.

The Bangash are for the most part Shia' Musalmans, and of the Gar faction in politics. They are reckoned amongst the Pathan tribes, although their origin is variously described and assigned to different sources. By some, the Bangash ancestor, Ismail, is connected with the Sultan Ismail, founder of the Samani dynasty, which succeeded to that of the Suffari (founded by Yacub bin Leith or Lais) 876 A.D. Ismail was surnamed Samani, after his great-grandfather Saman, a camel-driver by profession, and a highway robber by occupation, who had settled in the vicinity of Marv. The great-grandfather of this Saman again was Thahiri, or Dahiri, that is, belonged to the Dahir family or tribe. Dahir was the name of the Hindu Raja of Sind, who was conquered and slain by the Arab general, Muhammad Casim when he invaded that country ; and, as before suggested, it was from this Dahir family, after conversion to Islam, that the Tahiri dynasty sprung. But perhaps Bangash (or Bangakh, as pronounced by the hill Pathan,) may stand for Bangat, or Bankat, Chohan Rajput. Or the Bangash may be a branch of the Bangi division of the Khattak to be next noticed, and of the same stock as the Bangi division of the Sikh nation, and of Jata descent. The Bangash have emigrated largely to India, where they have established considerable colonies in various parts of the country, chiefly at Farrukhabad in the North- Western Provinces.

Notable persons

See also

Bangial

References

  1. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. ब-186
  2. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu, p.52, s.n. 1764
  3. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan By H. W. Bellew, p.79,109, 113,133,186
  4. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan, H. W. Bellew, p.105,117,119,184
  5. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan, p.105
  6. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan By H. W. Bellew, The Oriental University Institute, Woking, 1891, p.104-105

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