Gabdika

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Gabdika (गबदिका) was a janapada mentioned by Panini.

Origin

Mention by Panini

Gabdika (गबदिका) is mentioned by Panini in Ashtadhyayi. [1]

History

V. S. Agrawala[2] writes that Gaṇa-pāṭha of Panini refers to janapada Gabdika (IV.3.93), under Sindhvadi (सिन्ध्वादि) (IV.3.93) (सोअस्याभिजन:,अण्। सैन्धव:).[3] Gabdika = modern Gadderan, homeland of the Gaddi tribe beyond Dhaulidhar in the Chamba Valley.


V. S. Agrawala[4] writes that Patanjali makes clear makes clear the social status of the sudras in his time. Firstly there were sudras who were not excluded from Aryavrata but were living within its social system. Secondly, there was another class of sudras who were living outside Aryavrata and its society. He cites as examples (1) Kishkindha-Gabdikam (2) Shaka-Yavanam and (3) Saurya-Krauncham. Of these Kishkindha may be identified with Pali Khukhunndo in Gorakhpur, Gabdikā with Gaddis of Chamba, who were deemed as living outside the limits of Aryavrata, Saurya with Saureyya or Soron in Etah district and Krauncha with the later Krauncha-dvara some where in Garhwal.


The Mahabharata mentions the Janapadas in Himachal Pradesh such as Kuluta (Kullu), Trigarta (Kangra), Kulinda (Shimla hills and Sirmaur), Yugandhara (Bilaspur and Nalagarh), Gabdika (Chamba) and Audumbara (Pathankot).


The Dhauladhar range (lit. The White Range) is a southern branch of the main Outer Himalayan chain of mountains. It rises from the Indian plains to the north of Kangra and Mandi. Dharamsala, the headquarters of Kangra district, lies on its southern spur in above the Kangra Valley, which divides it from Chamba.[5]

External links

References

  1. V. S. Agrawala: India as Known to Panini, 1953, p.62
  2. V. S. Agrawala: India as Known to Panini, 1953, p.62
  3. V. S. Agrawala: India as Known to Panini, 1953, p. 498
  4. V. S. Agrawala: India as Known to Panini, 1953, p. 78
  5. Dhaula Dhar The Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 11, p. 287.