Jakhu

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Jakhu (Yakshu in Sanskrit) is said to have given name to Jakhar Jat gotra.[1] Sangu, Jakhu and Kada were in relation and they are said to have given names to Sangwan, Jakhar and Kadyan Jat gotras.[2] That's why many years back there existed no matrimonial relationship among these three gotras.

History

Hukum Singh Panwar (Pauria)[3] writes that Jakhar is derived from Yaksha. This tribe Jakhar claim Jakha or Jakhu, known as Yaksha or Yakshu in Sanskrit, to be their most ancient eponymous progenitor. [4][5] Hukum Singh Panwar[6] further writes that Yakshas were one of the tribes who fought the last battle of Dasrajna War (the battle of ten kings) under the leadership of Dasa Raja named Bheda against Bharatas tribes on the banks of Yamuna. The other tribes were Ajas, Sigrus, Alinas, Pakthas, Bhalana, Sivas, and Visanin. [7] M.L. Bhargava writes that after the defeat on the Yamuna River they migrated to the Oxus (Geek name) valley and gave the name to valley as Jaksha or Jaaksha. He opines that Budakhsis and their city Badakshan are known after the combined name of Bheda, the leader of the Yakshas and that of the latter, Bheda is also a Jat clan. [8][9]


Hukum Singh Panwar[10] writes: The Soviet Scientists found to their surprise that Yakutian nationality, living in remote Siberia, have in their blood the "HLA - B 70" antigen, which is possessed only by the Hindus of north India (The Indian Express, Chandigarh, dt. Oct. 24,1988). We surmise that, as the name suggests, the Yakuts must be Yakhus = Jakhus or in Sanskrit Yakshus and in Prakrit Jakhus (Jakhar Jats), who lived in the Drishad and Sarasvati Doab in the Rigvedic period and who were expelled to northern countries after their defeat in the last battle of the Dasharajna wars by the Bharatas and who, according to M.L. Bhargava, (who made an elaborate ethno-geographical study of the Sapta-Saindhava country of the Rigvedic period), gave their name as Yakhu (Oxus in Greek) and Yakshar (Jaxartes in Greek) to two rivers between the Aral sea and lake Balkhas (infra, ch. IX on migrations of Jats).


Hukum Singh Panwar (Pauria) writes that The Jats of Jakhar tribe traditionally remember Jakha or Jakhu as their progenitor. [11] Mahavamsa, provides a continuous historical record of over two millennia, and is considered one of the world's longest unbroken historical accounts.[12] It is one of the few documents containing material relating to the Nāga and Yakkha peoples, indigenous inhabitants of Lanka prior to the legendary arrival of Prince Vijaya from Singha Pura.


Jakhu, a Saroha Kshatriya, is said to have given name to Jakhar Jat gotra.[13]

इतिहास

पंडित अमीचन्द्र शर्मा[14]ने लिखा है: [p.23]: जाखड़ गोत्र के जाटों का बड़ा जाखू था। जाखू भी सरोहा क्षत्रिय था। वह सांगू का सहोदर भाई था। जाखू भी अपने भाई सांगू के साथ ही अजमेर से आया था और बीकानेर रियासत के ग्राम रिडी में बस गया। एक बार द्वारिका के महाराज ने अपनी पुत्री का स्वयंवर रचा था, जाखू भी वहाँ पहुंचा था, जाखू उस स्वयंवर के नियम पूर्ण नहीं कर सका।


[p.24]: जाखू ने द्वारका से आकर कराव कर लिया और जाट संघ में मिल गया। राजपूत उससे घृणा करने लगे। जाखू की संतान जाखड़ कहलाई। जिला रोहतक तहसील झज्जर में जाखड़ों के बहुत से गाँव हैं। उनमे लड़ान, सालास, झाडली आदि मुख्य गाँव हैं। जाखू की संतानों में एक लाड़ा हुये जिसने लड़ान गाँव बसाया। महम्मदियों के शासनकाल में इस गाँव का मालिक एक पठान था, पुनः यह गाँव किसी प्रकार लाडा के हाथ आ गया। यह सारा विवरण चौधरी बिहारी सिंह आल्ला नंबरदार और चौधरी रामनाथ हवलदार ने लिखवाया।

External links

References

  1. Jat Varna Mimansa (1910): Pandit Amichandra Sharma, Published by Lala Devidayaluji Khajanchi, p.24
  2. Jat Varna Mimansa (1910): Pandit Amichandra Sharma, Published by Lala Devidayaluji Khajanchi, pp.21-24
  3. Hukum Singh Panwar: The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/An Historico-Somatometrical study bearing on the origin of the Jats, p. 150-151
  4. Yoginder Pal Shastri, op. cit., p. 468
  5. Amichand Sharma, Jat Varna Mimansa, v.s. 1967
  6. Hukum Singh Panwar: The Jats - Their Origin, Antiquity & Migrations, p. 150-151
  7. Buddha Prakash, op. cit., p. 77
  8. M.L. Bhargava, Geography of the Rigvedic India, Lucknow, 1964, p. 129
  9. Hukum Singh Panwar: The Jats - Their Origin, Antiquity & Migrations, p. 150-151
  10. The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/Addenda,pp.ii-iii
  11. The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/An Historico-Somatometrical study bearing on the origin of the Jats, p.171,f.n.216
  12. Tripāṭhī, Śrīdhara, ed. (2008). Encyclopaedia of Pali Literature: The Pali canon. 1. Anmol. p. 117. ISBN 9788126135608.
  13. Jat Varna Mimansa (1910): Pandit Amichandra Sharma, Published by Lala Devidayaluji Khajanchi, p.24
  14. Jat Varna Mimansa (1910), Author: Pandit Amichandra Sharma, Published by Lala Devidayaluji Khajanchi, pp.23-24

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