Janar

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Janar (जनार) is gotra of Jats.[1][2]

Origin

It originated from place named Janjuha (जनजुहा). [3]

History

Maheswari Prasad consider this gotra to be originated from ancient Trigarta clan named Janaki. He[4] writes that it appears that at the time of the final redaction of the Mahabharata the tradition of the six important clans of the Trigartas was well established. It is carious to note that in connection with the application of a suffix Panini makes a reference to the Damini (दामिनी) group and the six Trigartas (दामन्यादि त्रिगर्तसष्टाच्छ: v.3.116). On the basis of an ancient verse the Kashika commentary names these as Kauṇḍoparastha (कौण्डोपरस्थ) , Dāṇḍakī (दाण्डकी), Krauṣṭakī (क्रौष्टकी), Jālamāni (जालमानि), Brahmagupta (ब्रह्मगुप्त), and Jānaki (जानकी). These communities mentioned in the grammatical literature can be identified with following Jat Gotra names:

  • (3) Dāṇḍakī (दाण्डकी): Dangi,
  • (5) Jālamāni (जालमानि): Jali,

Alexander Cunningham[5] writes that Between Multan and Alor the native historians, as well as the early Arab geographers, place a strong fort named Bhatia, which, from its position, has a good claim to be identified with the city which Alexander built amongst the Sogdi, as it is not likely that there were many advantageous sites in this level tract of country. It seems probable that it is the same place as Talhati, where Jam Janar crossed the Indus ; and perhaps also the same as Matila, or Mahatila, which was one of the six great forts of Sindh in the seventh century.

Notable persons

Distribution

External links

References

  1. Dr Pema Ram:‎Rajasthan Ke Jaton Ka Itihas, p.301
  2. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I,s.n. ज-38.
  3. Mahendra Singh Arya et al: Adhunik Jat Itihas, p.246
  4. Maheswari Prasad, “Jats in Ancient India”:The Jats, Ed. Dr Vir Singh, Vol.I, p. 26
  5. The Ancient Geography of India/Western India,p.256

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