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Kalashoka (कालाशोक) (395–367 BCE) (also Kalasoka, Kakavarna) son of Shishunaga, was ancient Buddhist King of Pushpapura (Peshawar) in Magadha dynasty. Kalasoka reigned twenty-eight years.

Jat clans

Kalas are descendants of Kalashoka (कालाशोक), son of Shishunaga.[1]


Ajātashatru (अजातशत्रु) (491 BC-461 BC) was a king of the Magadha empire that ruled north India.

Mahavansa/Chapter 4 tells us that when Ajatasattu's son Udayabhaddaka had slain him he, the traitor, reigned sixteen years. Udayabhaddaka's son Anuruddhaka slew (his father) and Anuruddha's son named Muia did likewise. Traitors and fools, these (sons) reigned over the kingdom; in the reign of these two (kings) eight years elapsed. Munla's son Nagadasaka slew his father and then did the evildoer reign twenty-four years.

Mahavansa/Chapter 4 further tells ....Then were the citizens wroth, saying: `This is a dynasty of parricides,' and when they had banished the king Nagadasaka they met together and (since) the minister known by the name Sisunaga was proved to be worthy, they anointed him king, mindful of the good of all. He reigned as king eighteen years. His son Kalasoka reigned twenty-eight years. At the end of the tenth year of Kalasoka's reign a century had gone by since the parinirvana of the Sambuddha.

Mahavansa/Chapter 4 tells .... They (theras) took those needful things (that they had brought as gifts) and sought the thera Revata, but the thera did not take their part and dismissed (the pupil) who took their part. They went thence to Vesali, shameless they went from there to Pupphapura, and told king Kalasoka: `Guarding our Master's perfumed chamber we dwell in the Mahävana-vihära in the Vajji territory; but bhikkhus dwelling in the country are coming, great king, with the thought: We will take the vihara for ourselves. Forbid them!'

Mahavansa/Chapter 4 tells .... The Second Council of Buddhism in the Valikarama protected by Käläsoka, under the leadership of the thera Revata.[2]

Mahavansa/Chapter 5 tells that ....The sons of Kalasoka were ten brothers, twenty-two years did they reign. Afterwards, the nine Nandas were kings in succession; they too reigned twenty-two years. Then did the brahman Canakka anoint a glorious youth, known by the name Candagutta, as king over all Jambudipa, born of a noble clan, the Moriyas, when, filled with bitter hate, he had slain the ninth (Nanda) Dhanananda.

Harsha Charita[3] mentions .... A base-born general, Pushpamitra, pounded his Maurya master Brihadratha, having displayed his whole army on the pretext of manifesting his power. Kakavarna, being curious of marvels, was carried away no one knows whither on an artificial aerial car made by a Yavana condemned to death. The son of Shishunaga had a dagger thrust into his throat in the vicinity of his city.

Jat History

The Kala or Kaliraman gotra is branch of nagavansh or Nagas. Dilip Singh Ahlawat has mention it as one of the ruling Jat clans in Central Asia. [4] Known as Kala in Maharashtra. Kalas are descendants of Kalashoka (कालाशोक) son of Shishunaga. They had won the Kalakuta (कालकूट) country also. [5] Kaliraman gotra started after Kali of Nagavansh. People of this gotra had republics in Singhpura and Bhagowala in Punjab.[6]

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