Kilak

From Jatland Wiki
(Redirected from Kilikoi)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Kilak (किलक)[1] Kilaka (किलक) Kilka (किलक) Keelka (कीलका) is a Gotra of Jats found in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. Kilikoi/Kiliki clan is found in Afghanistan.[2]

Origin

Cilicia/Kilikia : Kilak Jat clan may probably gets name after a place name Kilikia in Asia Minor. Cilicia was the south coastal region of Asia Minor and existed as a political entity from Hittite times into the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia during the late Byzantine Empire. In 67 BC, Pompey, after crushing the Cilician pirates, subjected Tarsus to Rome, and it became capital of the Roman province of Cilicia.[3]

History

H. W. Bellew[4] writes about a satrapy in Afghanistan composed of the Kilikoi, and apparently comprised the province of Kilikia, the modern Adana, with perhaps the adjoining province of Karaman with its capital Koniya, the ancient Ikonium. The Kiliki may perhaps be represented in Afghanistan by the Ghilji or Khiliji, The Ghilji of Afghanistan, called also Ghalzoe, Khalaja, and Khalachi, are said to be a Turk tribe from beyond the Jaxartes, and of the Khilichi or "Swords-men" tribe of Turk. They have been known in Afghanistan by the name of Ghilji or Khilichi, at least since the time of Mahmud of Ghazni, towards the close of the tenth century, and were probably settled in the country at a much earlier date. The name appears in the form of Khizilchi, or Khilichi, or Khizilji, as the patronymic of the Saljuk dynasty of Rum, or Asia Minor, whose capital was Ikonium, during the twelfth century. We have seen what is the composition of the Ghilji tribe of Afghanistan, and how largely it is made up of Indian elements.

H. W. Bellew[5] writes The Furmuli are situated between the Vaziri and the Kharoti, and are reckoned as Tajik ; their language is the old Persian of the Shah Nama ; they are quite distinct from both the Afghan and Pathan, but claim to be of common descent with the Khiliji, whose capital, they say, was the city of Khilij, to the westward of the Helmand and Kala Bost. Perhaps there is here some hazy reference to the ancient Kilikia in Asia Minor.

Greek History

The English spelling Cilicia is the same as the Latin, as it was transliterated directly from the Greek form Κιλικία (Kilikia). The palatalization of c occurring in the west in later Vulgar Latin (c. 500–700) accounts for its modern pronunciation in English.

The Greeks invented for Cilicia an eponymous Hellene founder in the purely mythical Cilix, but the historic[6] founder of the dynasty that ruled Cilicia Pedias was Mopsus,[7][8] identifiable in Phoenician sources as Mpš,[9][10] the founder of Mopsuestia[11][12] who gave his name to an oracle nearby.[13] Homer mentions the people of Mopsus, identified as Cilices (Κίλικες), as from the Troad in the northernwesternmost part of Anatolia.[14]

The Cilicians appear as Hilikku in Assyrian inscriptions, and in the early part of the first millennium BC were one of the four chief powers of Western Asia.

Alexander the Great occupies 333 BC

Alexander the Great occupied Cilicia in 333 BC....Arrian[15] writes ....The next day he (Alexander the Great) sent out to Ancyrain Galatia, where he was met by an embassy from the Paphlagonians, offering to surrender their nation to him and to enter into an alliance with him; but they requested him not to invade their land with his forces. He therefore commanded them to submit to the authority of Galas, the viceroy of Phrygia. Marching thence into Cappadocia, he subjugated all that part of it which lies on this side of the river Halys and much of that which lies beyond it. Having appointed Sabictas viceroy of Cappadocia, he advanced to the Gates of Cilicia, and when he arrived at the Camp of Cyrus, who (went) with Xenophon, and saw that the Gates were occupied by strong guards.


Arrian[16] writes ....After this he (Alexander the Great) sent Parmenio to the other Gates which separate the land of the Cilicians from that of the Assyrians, in order to capture them before the enemy could do so, and to guard the pass. He gave him the allied infantry, the Grecian mercenaries, the Thracians who were under the command of Sitalces, and the Theassalian cavalry. He afterwards marched from Tarsus, and on the first day arrived at the city of Anchialus, A city of Cilicia on the coast, a Little west of the mouth of the Cydnus. According to report, this city was founded by Sardanapalus the Assyrian; (last of the Assyrian kings) and both from the circumference and from the foundations of the walls it is evident that a large city had been founded and that it had reached a great pitch of power. Also near the wall of Anchialus was the monument of Sardanapalus, upon the top of which stood the statue of that king with the hands joined to each other just as they are joined for clapping. An inscription had been placed upon it in Assyrian characters, which the Assyrians asserted to be in metre. The meaning which the words expressed was this:—"Sardanapalus, son of Anacyndaraxas, built Anchialus and Tarsus in one day; but do thou, O stranger, eat, drink, and play, since all other human things are not worth this!" referring, as in a riddle, to the empty sound which the hands make in clapping. It was also said that the word translated play had been expressed by a more lewd one in the Assyrian language.

Distribution in Rajasthan

Villages in Ajmer district

Pushkar,

Villages in Churu district

Absar, Chhapar Churu (2), Parewara, Parihara, Sujangarh (6),

Villages in Jaipur district

Akhepura, Gangati Kalan, Hirnoda (20),

Villages in Nagaur district

Deusar, Gugarwar, Pundlota, Sanjoo, Soopka,

Villages in Sikar district

Sarwari,

Distribution in Madhya Pradesh

Villages in Harda district

Kartana,

Gallery of Kilak/Keelka people

Notable persons

  • पूसा राम किलक, पूणलौता- मारवाड़ जाट कृषक सुधार सभा की प्रबंधकारिणी और कार्यकारिणी में रहकर आप ने जाट जाति की सेवा करके अपने को कृतार्थ किया है। [17]
  • Ajay Singh Kilak - Elected M.L.A. in 2008 from Degana, Rajasthan.
  • Daula Ram (Keelka) - RPS. Present Address : Mirdha Nagar, Kuchaman City, Distt.- Nagaur, Raj. Resident Phone Number : 01586-221209, Mobile Number : 9413648244
  • Ganesh Patel Kilak - Social worker. From village Kartana, Harda, M. P., Ph:07577-222593, Mob:9826567964[18]
  • Omprakash Keelka - Ex. Sarpanch, Absar.
  • Harendra Singh Keelka - Freelance journalist & Educationalist, Sarwari, Dhod, Sikar (332030) Mo.- 9529060772

External Links

See also

References

  1. डॉ पेमाराम:राजस्थान के जाटों का इतिहास, 2010, पृ.298
  2. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan By H. W. Bellew, The Oriental University Institute, Woking, 1891, p.58,141
  3. Bosworth, C. E. (1992). "The City of Tarsus and the Arab-Byzantine Frontiers in Early and Middle ʿAbbāsid Times". Oriens. 33: 269. ISSN 0078-6527. JSTOR 1580607.
  4. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan By H. W. Bellew, 1891, p.58
  5. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan By H. W. Bellew, 1891, p.126
  6. Edwards, I. E. S. (editor) (2006) The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 2, Part 2, History of the Middle East and the Aegean Region c. 1380–1000 B.C. (3rd edition) Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, page 680, ISBN 0-521-08691-4
  7. Edwards, I. E. S. (editor) (2006) The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 2, Part 2, History of the Middle East and the Aegean Region c. 1380–1000 B.C. (3rd edition) Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, page 680, ISBN 0-521-08691-4
  8. Fox, Robin Lane (2009) Travelling Heroes: In the Epic Age of Homer Alfred A. Knopf, , New York, pages 211-224, ISBN 978-0-679-44431-2
  9. Fox, Robin Lane (2009) Travelling Heroes: In the Epic Age of Homer Alfred A. Knopf, , New York, page 216, ISBN 978-0-679-44431-2
  10. Edwards, I. E. S. (editor) (2006) The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 2, Part 2, History of the Middle East and the Aegean Region c. 1380–1000 B.C. (3rd edition) Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, page 364, ISBN 0-521-08691-4
  11. Edwards, I. E. S. (editor) (2006) The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 2, Part 2, History of the Middle East and the Aegean Region c. 1380–1000 B.C. (3rd edition) Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, page 364, ISBN 0-521-08691-4
  12. Smith, William (1891) A Classical Dictionary of Biography, Mythology, and Geography based on the Larger Dictionaries (21st edition) J. Murry, London, page 456, OCLC 7105620
  13. Edwards, I. E. S. (editor) (2006) The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 2, Part 2, History of the Middle East and the Aegean Region c. 1380–1000 B.C. (3rd edition) Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, page 364, ISBN 0-521-08691-4
  14. Sayce, A. H. (October 1922) "The Decipherment of the Hittite Hieroglyphic Texts" The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland 4: pp. 537–572, page 554
  15. The Anabasis of Alexander/2a, Ch. 4
  16. The Anabasis of Alexander/2a, Ch.5
  17. Thakur Deshraj: Jat Jan Sewak, 1949, p.210
  18. Jat Samaj, June 2009, p. 30

Back to Jat Gotras