Moond

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Moond

Moond (मूंड) Munda (मुण्ड)[1] Mund (मूंड) Mund (मुंड)/(मुण्ड)[2] Mund (मून्द)/Moond (मूण्ड)[3] Moondh (मूंढ)[4] is a clan of Jats. Moond Jats are found in Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Punjab and Haryana in India. Mund/Munda (Kachwaha) clan is found in Afghanistan.[5] Munda (मुण्डा) Jat Gotra is also found in Ahirs.[6] They were supporters of Tomar Confederacy. [7] They were supporters of Bhati Confederacy. [8] [9] [10]

Origin

James Tod writes that Moondraj was son of Mangal Rao, who was son of Raja Bhatti, grandson of Raja Baland and great grandson of Salivahana (S.72 = AD 16). The offspring of Moondraj are the Moonds[11]

Genealogy of Moondraj

Hukum Singh Panwar[12] has given the ancestry of Bharatpur rulers starting from 1. Yadu. Shini is at S.No. 38, Krishna at S.No. 43 and Vajra at S.No. 46[13]. From Naba at S.No. 47 onward we follow James Tod[14] who has based on records of Brahman Sukhdharma of Mathura.

1. Yadu → → → → 34. Andhaka → 35. Bhajmana → 36. Viduratha → 37. Shura → 38. Shini → 39. Bhoja → 40. Hardika → 41. Devamidha → 42. Vasudeva → 43. Krishna → 44. Pradyumna → 45. Aniruddha → 46. Vajra

47. Naba → 48. Prithibahu → 49. Bahubal (w.Kamlavati Puar) → 50. Bahu → 51. Subahu → 52. Rijh → 53. Raja Gaj (founded Ghazni in Yudhishthira 3008= BC 93) → 54. Salivahana (S.72 = AD 16) → 55. Raja Baland → 56. Raja Bhatti → 57. Mangal Rao → 58. Majam Rao, Kullarsi, Moondraj, Seoraj, Phool, Kewala.

Mythological accounts

We find mention in Indian epics of both Munda and Murunda. Murunda is probably Sanskritization of Munda.

Mundas in Mahabharata

Adi Parva, Mahabharata/Mahabharata Book I Chapter 57 tells Names of all those Nagas that fell into the fire of the snake-sacrifice. Munda is mentioned in shloka 12 as Nagas of race of Takshaka.

ऐण्डिलः कुण्डलॊ मुण्डॊ वेणि सकन्धः कुमारकः
बाहुकः शृङ्गवेगश च धूर्तकः पातपातरौ

Aswamedha Parva in English, Mahabharata Book 14:Section VIII, mentions about Mundas

हरि केशाय मुण्डाय कृशायॊत्तारणाय च
भास्कराय सुतीर्दाय देवदेवाय रंहसे (XIV.8.15)

They have been mentioned in Mahabharata Shalya Parva as Mundagriva.

The Mahabharata, Book 9: Shalya Parva, Chapter 44, shloka 90 mentions Munda as under:

तरिशिठा दविशिखाश चैव तदा सप्त शिखाः परे
शिखण्डिनॊ मुकुटिनॊ मुण्डाश च जटिलास तदा (IX.44.90)
मण्डॊदरी च तुण्डा च कॊटरा मेघवासिनी
सुभगा लम्बिनी लम्बा वसु चूडा विकत्दनी (IX.45.17)


Kurukshetra War Day-3 in Mahabharata[15] mentions Mundas fighting with Kauravas.

Mundas in Puranas

Vishnu Purana - Mundas have been mentioned as Marúńd́as as rulers of Magadha in Vishnu_Purana/Book_IV:Chapter_XXIV[16] along with Sarúńd́as and Purúńd́as. Vishnu Purana[17] gives list of Kings who ruled Magadha. ...After these, various races will reign, as seven Ábhíras, ten Garddhabas, sixteen Śakas, eight Yavanas, fourteen Tusháras, thirteen Mundas, eleven Maunas, altogether seventy-nine princes , who will be sovereigns of the earth for one thousand three hundred and ninety years.

Total--85 kings, Váyu; 89, Matsya; 76, and 1399 years, Bhág.

Here Sunda and Munda words have been sanskritized in these forms, like Jat as Jarta and Gujar as Gurjara.

History

Ram Swarup Joon[18] writes about Sheoran, Shivran: According to the bard of this dynasty king Gaj of Ghazni had two sons named Mangal Rao and Masur Rao. Mangal Rao was the ruler of Lahore and Masur Rao of Sialkot. Foreign invaders drove both of them out of their kingdoms. Masur Rao fled away to the deserts of Rajasthan. He had two sons named Abhai Rao and Saran Rao. Descendants of Abhai Rao came to be called Bhurhya Bhatti and those of Saran Rao, Saran. Mangal Rao had six sons, named Mojam Rao, Gulrish, Moolraj, Sheoraj, Kewl Rao and Phul Rao. Descendants of Gulrish came to be called Gloraya or Kiliraya, those of Moolraj, Munda and those Sheoraj, Sheoran. Descendants of Kewal Rao and Phul Rao adopted pottery as their profession and were called Kumhar.

The Sheoran gotra is a big gotra having 52 villages in Luharu 25 in Dadri and 25 big villages in Hissar. People belonging to Kiliraya and Munda gotras are found in Bikaner State.


Hisar gets its name from Jats who came from Afghanistan from place known as Bal Hisar or Mood Hisar or Hisar, a town in Afghanistan. Hisar is an abundant city in Afghanistan. Bal Hisar city was founded by Balhara gotra jats and Mood Hisar city by Moond gotra jats in Afganistan. [19]

B S Dahiya[20] writes about Mund - The Vishnu Purana says that 13 kings of Munda clan shall rule over India for 200 years. But history, as known today, does not indicate the existence of any such reign. The fault lies with history, not with the Mundas, who did rule over India for two centuries. According to J. Allan, "We have considerable evidence to show that in the early centuries of the Christian era, the Murunda (Mund) kingdom was a powerful one, covering a greater part of the Ganga valley, and that the dynasty was a foreign one."[21] We have maintained that all the Jats, Gujars, Ahirs (the later Rajputs) came from outside in different waves. No wonder, that the Munds, ruling at Magadha, were found to be kings of foreign origin.

According to Jat historians this gotra gets name after place called Mandovar (मंडोवर).[22] Bhim Singh Dahiya writes that the Allahabad pillar inscription of Samudragupta mentions about Munda clan.[23] Abhidhana Chintamani of Hema Chandra Says, “ Lampakastu Murundah Syuh” showing that they were considered Sakas. Murunda is a Saka/Scythian title, meaning Chief/ Head.


Dr Pema Ram writes that after the invasion of Alexander in 326 BC, the Jats of Sindh and Punjab migrated to Rajasthan. They built tanks, wells and Bawadis near their habitations. The tribes migrated were: Shivis, Yaudheyas, Malavas, Madras etc. The Shivi tribe which came from Ravi and Beas Rivers founded towns like Sheo, Sojat, Siwana, Shergarh, Shivganj etc. This area was adjoining to Sindh and mainly inhabited by Jats. The Jats of Gotra Mund came to Nagaur via Bhatiana. [24]


H.A. Rose[25] refers By Mr. W. S. Talbot in the Jhelum Gazetteer, 1905, pp. 102— 104, who mentions the Gangs and Munds who are generally reckoned as Awans, but who are probably only affiliated indigenous clans.


Megasthenes has mentioned them as Monedes. (See - Jat clans as described by Megasthenes).

Alexander Cunningham[26] writes about Visit of Sangala by Xuanzang in 630 & 633 AD. He writes that The Sangala of Alexander has long ago been recognized in the Sakala of the Brahmans and the Sāgal of the Buddhists. He has identified Sakala with Sanglawala Tiba, which is a small rocky hill forming two sides of a triangle, with the open side towards the south-east. On the cast and south sides the approach to the hill is covered by a large swamp, half a mile in length, and nearly a quarter of a mile in breadth, which dries up annually in the summer, but during the seasonal rains has a general depth of about 3 feet. In the time of Alexander this must have been a fine sheet of water, which has been gradually lessened in depth by the annual washings of silt from the hill above. On the north-eastern side of the hill there are the remains of two large buildings, from which I obtained old bricks of the enormous size of 17½ by 11 by 3 inches. Close by there is an old well which was lately cleared out by some of the wandering tribes. On the north-western side, 1000 feet distant, there is a low ridge of rock called Munda-ka-pura, from 26 to 30 feet in height, and about 500 feet in length, which has formerly been covered with brick buildings. At 1¾ mile to the south, there is another ridge of three small hills, called Arna and little Sangala.


James Tod writes that Chandravanshi King Prithibahu, son of Naba became prince of Marusthali. He had a son Bahubal, who espoused Kamlavati Puar, daughter of Vijaya Singh, Prince of Malwa. His son Bahu was killed by a fall from his horse ; he left one son, Subahu, who was poisoned by his wife, a daughter of Mund Raja Chohan of Ajmer : he left a son, Rijh, who reigned twelve years. He was married to Subhag Sundri, daughter of Ber Sing, prince of Malwa. His son was Raja Gaj. [27]

Rawal Moond

James Tod writes that Bhatti Chief Deoraj had two sons, Moond and Chadu ; the last, by a wife of the Baraha tribe, had five sons, whose descendants were styled Chada Rajputs. Deoraj excavated several large lakes in the territory of Khadal (in which Deorawal is situated) ; one at Tanot is called Tanosar ; another, after himself, Deosar. Having one day gone to hunt, slightly attended, he was attacked by an ambush of the Channa Rajputs, and slain with twenty-six of his attendants, after having reigned fifty-live years. His kin and clans shaved their locks and moustaches, excepting Moond.[28]

Rawal Moond, who succeeded Deoraj, and performed all the ceremonies during the twelve days. Having made his ablutions with the water from sixty-eight different wells, in which were immersed the leaves of one hundred and eight different shrubs and trees, a female of spotless virtue waved the burning frankincense over his head. Before him was placed the punchamrita, consisting of curds, milk, butter, sugar, and honey ; likewise pearls, gems, the royal umbrella, the grass called doob, various flowers, a looking-glass, a young virgin, a chariot, a flag or banner, the vela flower, seven sorts of grain, two fish, a horse, a nukhunk (unknown), a bullock, a shell, a lotus, a vessel of water, the tail of the wild ox (chaonr), a sword, a female calf, a litter, yellow clay, and prepared food. Then, seated on the lion's hide, — (on which were painted the seven dwipas or continents of Hindu cosmography, appareled in the dress of the Jogi, and covered with ashes (bhabhut), with the mudra in his ears), — the white chaonr (ox-tail) was waved over his head, and he was inaugurated on the gadi of Deoraj, while the Purohit and chiefs presented their offerings. The teeka-dour was against the assassins of his father, who had congregated for defence, eight hundred of whom were put to death. [29]

Rawal Moond had one son, who was called Bachara. When about fourteen years of age the coco-nut came from Bullub-sen Solanki, Raja of Patun.[30]

Villages founded by Mund clan

Sub sections of Bhatti

According to H.A. Rose[31] Jat clans derived from Bhatti are: Lahar, Sara, Bharon, Makar, Mond, Kohar, Saharan, Isharwal, Khetalan, Jatai, Khodma, Bloda, Batho and Dhokia.[32]

Mundas the rulers in Magadha

Bhim Singh Dahiya has mentioned about the rule of Munda people in Magadha. The inscriptional evidences show that Jat rulers and tribes in north India from Kabul to Cuttack, in the period following the disintegration of Kushanas empire. Particularly Magadha area was under the rule of people who had the title, Murunda. They are admitted to be Sakas or Scythians. [33]

The Geographike of Ptolemy says that in 140 AD, the Murundas were established in the valley of the river Sarabos or Sarayu. [34] Half a century later, Oppien mentions the "Muruandien" as a Gangetic people. [35] S R Goyal quotes several other Jain authorities to show that Patliputra in particular, as well as Kanyakubja were ruled by Murundas/Sakas. The Jain ascetic, Padlipta Suri, cured the Murunda ruler of Patliputra of terrible headache and converted him to Jainism. [36] During the reign of Wu dynasty (220 - 227 AD) Fan Chen, the King of Kambodia, according to PC Bagchi sent his relative as ambassador to the Indian King of Patliputra. The ambassador was heartily welcomed and the gesture was returned by the Indian king who sent two men as ambassador as well as four horses of the Yue-chi i.e. the Jat country, as presents to the King of Kambodia. According to this account Buddhism was in prosperous state at that time in Magadha and the title of the king was Meouloun. This title has been identified with Murunda and this shows that in the middle of third century AD the Murundas were still ruling over Patliputra. [37] These Murunda rulers of Patliputra had special relations with Peshawar. It was but natural, for, after all Murundas and Kushanas both belonged to the same Scithian stock. [38]

From this it is clear that racially the rulers of Magadha in the third century AD were identical with Kushanas, ruling Afghanistan. In the Puranas they are mentioned as ruling India after the Tukharas (Takhar Jats) and Puranas also say that 13 kings of Murunda dynasty ruled India. It is significant that the Puranas also mention that these Murunda rulers destroyed the caste system and, in the language of Purans, they raised "low caste people" to high offices and all these people were of "Mleccha" origin. The Vishnu Purana correctly gives the clan name of these people as Munda - a still existing Jat clan. The title Murunda means "Lord", in Saka language, as per Sten Konow. [39]

Thus the literary evidence and evidence of Puranas shows that immediately before the Guptas, the Mundas were ruling over Magadha and their rule lasted for about two centuries, by taking 15 years for one rule. It is unfortunate that none of the thirteen rulers, is even named in the Indian history. This is really a pity for the Indian historians. Apparently, all this was deliberately done to remove all traces of the rule of the Jats which lasted for many centuries in all parts of India. It is possible that the Puranas, which were revised during or after the Gupta age, deliberately excluded details of these Jat rulers. [40]

Thus inscriptional as well as the literary and Puranic evidence shows that various Jat clans ruling in North India. The Varikas, the Mauryas, the Mundas, the Kushanas, the Taanks, etc. are of them. Various other clans having republic governments, mentioned in the Allahabad Pillar inscription of Samudragupta, are still existing Jat clans. This clear picture of different Jat clans ruling in different parts of north India is striking and can not be ignored by any writer of Indian history. [41]

Khoh Copper-plate Inscription of the Maharaja Sharvanatha (533-534 CE), a kalachuri king, mentions to be born of a Murunda Maharani and Mahârâja Jayanâtha:

(Line 6.)— His son, who meditates on his feet, the Mahârâja Sharvanâtha,— begotten on the Mahâdêvi Murundasvâminî — being in good health, issues a command to the residents, beginning with. the Brâhmans, at the villages of Vyâghrapallika and Kâcharapallika in the Maninâga pêtha.

Sir Alexander Cunningham[42] writes that Mundas belong to the hill men of the north, who are spread over the Himalayan and Vindhyan mountains from the Indus to the Bay of Bengal.

Mundesvari Temple by Munda Raja

Mundesvari Temple is near Ramgarh town in Kaimur district

Mundesvari Temple (मुण्डेश्वरी मंदिर) is one of very ancient temples of Bihar, at village Ramgarh, situated on the Pawara hill, 10 km from Bhabua (भबुवा) town, which is in Kaimur district in Bihar. An inscription[43] in two broken pieces was found in this temple and has been interpreted by some historians to identify the origin of the temple to the year 635 A.D. The inscription refers to Udayasena, the Kulapati Bhagudalana, as the ruling chief and records various donations to Mandalesvara. [44]

Francis Buchanan, in his account of the District of Shahabad in 1812-13, has left a description of the Mundesvari temple and the tradition associated with it. According to Buchanan it was constructed by a certain Munda Raja, whom people pretty generally call a Chero Raja. The pandit of the survey says that he was a Daitya, who had a brother named Chanda, and both lived in the golden age. These brothers who, according to the Markandeya Purana, were the chief military officers (senaptis) of Sumbha and Nisumbha, two great infidel (Daitya) kings, were killed by Parvati, who on that account is called Chamunda, a title, it is said, composed of the two infidels' names. [45]

It is further said that the proper name of Chayanpur is Chanupur derived from one of the brothers who resided there, while a small temple named Mundesvari, and situated on a hill about five miles east from Chayanpur, was built by the Daitya Munda. If there is any foundation for the Puranic legend, it may refer to some exploits in the Indian warfare of Semiramis; but from the appearance of the ruins I have little doubt not only of the truth of the common report of Munda Raja having been a Chero but that he was some small chief, who retained a dependent principality long after his nation had ceased to possess the imperial dignity. [46]

The town where Munda resided is called Garohat, and was situated on the banks of the Katane, just in the eastern mouth of a valley formed between the great mass and the detached range of hills west from Bhagwanpur. The whole of this valley was originally called Mukeri Kho; but that name has of late been restricted to a large recess towards its east end, down which the Katane flows.[47]

The situation was judicially chosen for the residence of a person such as I suppose Munda to have been; as it is not only in a very rich country, but has behind it recesses in the mountains that are capable of defence by a small force; and even in case of defeat, the mountains afford a secure means of escape...." [48]

Mundeshvari Inscription of Udayasena The Harsha Year 30 (635 AD)

Text of Mundeshvari Inscription of Udayasena

1. Om Samba(mva)tsare trinsati[tame] Kārttika-divase dvāvinsatime

2. asminsamba(mva)tsara-māsa[diva]sa-purvvayam shri-Mahāsamanta-

3. Mahāpratihāra-Mahāraj-[Oda]yasena-rajya kulapati-Bhagudalana-

4. s=sa devanikayom danda[nā]yaka-Gomibhaṭena prārtthayitva

5. mātapittror=atmanas=cha pu[nya]bhivriddhaye Vinitesvara-maṭhasamā-

6. vesam maṭhām=tat=karākaram [Sri-]Narāyana-devakulasya

7. sri-Mandalesvara-svami-[pādā]ya koshthikātah a-chandr-ārkka-sama-

8. kāliyam=akshayam prati[dinām] naivedyarttham taṇḍula-prastha-dvayam

9. dipa-taila-palasya ch=O[pani]bandhah kāritah sri-Mandalesvara


10. svami-pādānām vichchhi[tti-vi]srānt-tantra-sādhāraṇam panchasātām

11. dinaranam goba . . . ja-bhaktādy-upakaraṇani

12. devanikayasya datta[m=etad=e]vam viditvā yathākal-ādhyā [sibhij-

13. r=apovanikair=vvā ya[thani]baddhasya vighāto na kā[rya]

14. evam=abhisravito yo[=nyathā]kuryāt=sa mahapatakais sa[ha]

15 [nara]ke vaset evam . . . vadharaṇaya madhya

16 ..... bhāka . , , tam=iti [Ukta[n=cha]

17 ....... yatnad=raksha Yudhishthira

18 .....

Mundeshvari Inscription of Udayasena The Harsha Year 30 (635 AD)[49]

This inscription, was discovered among the debris which had accumulated around the temple of Mundesvari (मुण्डेश्वरी) in the Bhabua subdivision of the Shahabad district. Mundesvari Temple (मुण्डेश्वरी मंदिर) is one of very ancient temples of Bihar at village Ramgarh, situated on the Pawara hill, 10 km from Bhabua (भबुवा) town, which is in Kaimur district in Bihar. The inscription was finally brought to the Indian Museum in the beginning of 1904.


The inscription records a grant of two prasthas of rice and a pala of oil to the god Mandaleshwara by a kulapati named Bhāgudalana. It is dated in the year 30 in the reign of the Mahasamanta, Mahapratihara, Maharaja, Udayasena, who is not known from other sources.

Judging from, the affinity of the characters of this inscription with those of the years 34 and 39 from Nepal, 6th era is most probably that established by Harshavardhana.

Translation

Hail. In the year 30, on the twenty-second day of Karttika, the the above mentioned year, month and day, in the reign of the great feudatory, the Mahapratihara the Maharaja [Uda]yasena, the Kulapati Bhagudalana, having applied to the Council of gods through the dandanayaka Gomibhaṭa built this maṭha of the davakula of Narayana, to increase the merit of his father and mother and of his own self, near the temple of Vintesvara. For the lord Mandalesvara provision has been made every day, as long as the Sun and Moon last everlastingly, to provide two prasthas of rice for the votive offering a pala of oil for the lamp from the treasury. Fifty dinaras current up to the frontiers.... of the Lord Mandalevara- ..... wit h rice and other ingredients. Knowing it to be a gift of council of gods, the merchants who trade on the waters(?) and who arrive on the proper time should not hinder this arrangement. Having heard this, whoever contrary shall live in hell with great sins .... O! Yudhishthira, presrve with care ....... preservation is preferable to gifts.

Mundeswari River

Location of Mundeswari River

Mundeswari river is a small river in West Bengal which causes floods in Hooghly, Purba Medinipur and Howrah districts during the monsoons.

It originates as a canal from Srirampur, a village in Madabdihi at the police station in Raina II block of the Bardhaman district. It flows past Kaiti Chakbhura and enters the Hooghly District. It ultimately flows into the Rupnarayan River.[50]


The river is not mentioned in the 1910 district gazetteers, but it is mentioned in the 1994 Bardhaman District gazetteer.[51]

During the devastating floods of 1914, the Damodar River split in two. One part joined the Mundeswari and the main channel of water of the Damodar now flows into the Mundeswari, turning it into a major river.[52]

Mundasthala in Sirohi district

Mungthala (मुंगथला) (Mungathala) is a village in Abu Road tahsil of Sirohi district in Rajasthan. This name occurs in number of epigraphs of 12th century as Mundasthala (मुण्डस्थल). This proves its antiquity. This was a sacred Shvetambara Jaina tirtha sacred to Mahavira. In an inscription of 14th century it is called Mahatirtha. [53]

Mundasthala (मुण्डस्थल) indicates the presence of Mund Gotra Jats in the Sirohi area in ancient times.

Bard's view of Origin

According to the bard of this dynasty king Gaj of Ghazni had two sons named Mangal Rao and Masur Rao. Mangal Rao was the ruler of Lahore and Masur Rao of Sialkot. Foreign invaders drove both of them out of their kingdoms. Masur Rao fled away to the deserts of Rajasthan. He had two sons named Abhai Rao and Saran Rao. Descendants of Abhai Rao came to be called Bhurhya Bhatti and those of Saran Rao, Saran. Mangal Rao had six sons, named Mojam Rao, Gulrish, Moolraj, Sheoraj, Kewl Rao and Phul Rao. Descendants of Gulrish came to be called Gloraya or Kiliraya, those of Moolraj, Munda and those Sheoraj, Sheoran. Descendants of Kewal Rao and Phul Rao adopted pottery as their profession and were called Kumhar.[54] [55]

Bhim Singh Dahiya [56] quotes Kalhana and states that Bhatti had two sons, Masur Rao and Mangal Rao. Masur Rao had two sons, Abhe Rao and Saran Rao. The sons of Abhe are called Abhoria and "Saran quarreled with and separated from his brother, and his issues descended to the rank of cultivators and are well known as Saran Juts".[57] The second son, Mangal Rao, had six sons, and he fled from his kingdom leaving his children in hiding with a banker; they were married in Jut families and thus Kalloria, Munda and Seora Jat clans, are named after the three sons of Mangal Rao. (The names of these clans, however, are Kallar, Mund and Seoran, respectively.)


Ramesh Chandra Gunarthi[58], in his book "Rajasthani Jatiyon ki Khoj" (1977), has mentioned about the origin of this gotra. One of the sons of Raja Mangal Rao Bhojsi of Bhati clan was Moonda who joined Jats. The descendants of Moonda are known as Moond. The capital of Moond Kings was at village Mandore in Jodhpur district. Some Other places connected with the history of Moonds are Munda (Churu district), Mundsar (Bikaner district), Mundara (Pali district), Mandawa (Jhunjhunu district) etc.


People belonging to Kiliraya and Munda gotras are found in Bikaner State.

Bhojpur district map, Bihar

It is interesting to not that bards have shown association of Kulharia and Mund clans. This gets evidence in the form of a town called Kulharia, a village in Bhojpur district in Bihar, India. It is located near the confluence of the Ganges and Sone Rivers, some 24 miles from Danapur and 36 miles from Patna.

Distribution in Rajasthan

Moond gotra Jats are found in Distt Jhunjhunu, Sikar, Bikaner, Barmer, Jaipur, Hanumangarh, Tonk, Nagaur and Jodhpur in Rajasthan. The distribution in villages in these districts is as under:

Locations in Jaipur city

Ambabari, Khatipura, Murlipura Scheme, Vidyadhar Nagar,

Villages in Jaipur district

Akoda, Hatoopura,

Villages in Bhilwara district

Balapura Asind,

Villages in Dausa district

Moond Bisya,

Villages in Sikar district

Baral, Bhainrupura, Chaindas Ki Dhani, Chala, Dhani Piploda, Dulhepura, Ghassu Ka Bas, Hardayalpura, Jassi Ka Bas, Kolida, Mailasi, Mandeta, Meelon Ki Dhani, Moondwara, Piprali, Shivsinghpura, Sihot Chhoti, Sikar, Sola, Swami ki Dhani (Nechhwa) Swami ki Dhani, Tonk Chhilari,

Villages in Jhunjhunu district

Ajari Kalan, Bajawa, Basawa, Jaisinghpura, Jakhal, Jhunjhunu, Majhau,

Villages in Nagaur district

Adaksar, Bhawal Charna, Dodoo, Nagwara, Nimod, Sarunda,

Villages in Barmer district

Balau Jati, Bataru, Bayatu Panji, Baytu, Bhadrai, Bhojasar, Chaukriya Ki Dhani, Chiriya, Garal (35), Kekad, Kothala, Lilala, Mahigoniyon Moodhon Ki Dhani, Moodhnon Ki Dhani (t.Sheo), Moodhnon Ki Dhani, Moodhon Ka Tala, Moodhonki Dhani, Moodhsar, Patasar, Sanjta, Umarlai Khalsa,

Villages in Bikaner district

11 DKD Khajuwala, 2 KWSM, 3 Rjd, Baladesar, Gusaina, Kalu, Khajuwala, Khari Charnan, Kolayat, Moondsar, Ranisar, Ramnagar, Ranjeetpura, Sansardesar, Takhatpura, Chak 3 Kpm ,

Villages in Ganganagar district

Gharsana, Khatsajwar,

Villages in Hanumangarh district

Amarpura Jalukhat, Dabli Kalan, Dholipal, Hanumangarh, Katheda, Kharakhera, Khat Jalu, Khothanwali, Ludhana, Nagrana, Ratanpura Sangaria, Dungrana, Pirkamdia (पीरकामडिया), Khat, Bahlol Nagar, Dolta Wala Chak, Dingarh, Dungrana [59]

Villages in Churu district

Bheemsana, Karansar, Lambor Chhoti, Mundital, Murdakiya, Paharsar (10), Soorwas, Sujangarh (15),

Villages in Tonk district

Deshami (11), Ganeshpura (5), Rajpura (11),

Villages in Baran district

Deori Moond, Moonda Ghata, Moondki, Moondla, Moondli, Mundala, Mundiya,

Distribution in Haryana

Villages in Hisar district

Dhiranwas,

Distribution in Punjab

Bhaguwala,

Villages in Rupnagar district

Villages in Rupnagar district

Distribution in Madhya Pradesh

Villages in Ratlam district

Villages in Ratlam district with population of this gotra are:

Bilpank 1, Chikliya 1, Dantodiya 1, Ratlam 1,

Notable persons

  • Moondraj was son of Mangal Rao, who was son of Raja Bhatti, grandson of Raja Baland and great grandson of Salivahana (S.72 = AD 16). The offspring of Moondraj are the Moonds[60]
  • Harchand Ram Moond - Social reformer.
  • Bhikha Ram Moondh - Martyrs of Kargil war from Rajasthan.
  • Chaudhari Nandram Moond (Adaksar), was among the five Jats who became martyr in Dabra kand in opposing the oppressive activities of jagirdars on 13 March 1947.
  • Ratan Lal Moond - RJS Rajasthan, Date of Birth : 16-December-1966, VPO.- Baral , distt.- Sikar, Raj. Mob: 9602624121
  • Nathu Ram Chaudhary (Moondh) - Chief Engineer, Railways, IES 1985 from Bayatu Panji (Barmer).
  • Vijay Singh Moond - ex chairman GSS from Dabli Kalan.
  • Dolat Ram Moond - [Kisan Morcha Jila President Hanuman Garh] are notable person in Dabli Kalan.
  • R.R. Choudhary (Moond) - Date of Birth : 1-January-1958, Superintendent Custams & Central Excise, VPO- Nagwara, tah: Nawa, Nagaur, Present Address : D-38, Nirman Nagar, Ajmer Road, Jaipur, Resident Phone Number : 0141-2810891, Mobile Number : 9829162509
  • Roogha Ram Choudhary (Moond) - Date of Birth : 1-January-1958, CENTRAL EXCISE & CUSTOMS, VP. Nagwaran TEH. NANWA DISTT.NAGAUR, Present Address : D-38, NIRMAN NAGAR ,AJMER ROAD JAIPUR, Resident Phone Number : 0141-2810891, Mobile Number : 9829162502
  • Dr. Surendra Kumar Moond - Assistant Professor College of Horticulture & Forestry, Date of Birth : 17-September-1975, VPO - Kolida, Via- Kudan, Distt.- Sikar Raj.-332040, Present Address : JR-16, Collector Residence, Civil Lines, Mama-Bhanja Chauraha, Jhalawar-326001, Mob: 9414595605, Email: drskmoond@yahoo.com
  • Bhoma Ram Jat (Moond) - Village: Kekad, Barmer, Raj.
  • Shristi Moond- RJS-2011 from Sikar district.
  • Shubhkaran Moond Chaudhari - elected in Rajathan Assembly as BJP MLA-2013 from Udaipurwati.
  • कैलाश चौधरी (मूंढ)- elected in Rajathan Assembly as BJP MLA-2013 from Baytu, Barmer, State President, Bhartiya Janta Kisan Morcha.
  • Mukesh Mund - RAS (2012), OT at HCM HIPA Jaipur, Earlier RTS, From: Piprali, Sikar, M: 9460954844
  • Bhagirath Moond lecturer hindi, Chak 3 KPM (Takhatpura) Bikaner.
  • Rajendra Moond: DPO, M: 9460789723

Gallery of Moond people

References

  1. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.56,s.n. 2080
  2. B S Dahiya:Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study), p.241, s.n.150
  3. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. म-53
  4. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.56,s.n. 2080
  5. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan,H. W. Bellew, p.131
  6. Ram Sarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter VI,p.111
  7. Jat Varna Mimansa (1910) by Pandit Amichandra Sharma,p. 56
  8. Jat Varna Mimansa (1910) by Pandit Amichandra Sharma,p. 57
  9. Bhim Singh Dahiya: Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/Appendices/Appendix I, p.316
  10. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/J,p.376
  11. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204
  12. The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/Appendices/Appendix No.1
  13. Yadu Vamsavali of Bharatpur given by Ganga Singh in his book 'Yadu Vamsa', Part 1, Bharatpur Rajvansa Ka Itihas (1637-1768), Bharatpur, 1967, pp. 19-21
  14. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.196-201
  15. (Mahabharata 6.56)
  16. The Vishnu Purana, translated by Horace Hayman Wilson, 1840, p. 475
  17. Vishnu Purana/Book IV:Chapter XXIV pp.474-476
  18. Ram Swarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter V, p. 100
  19. Jat Samaj, Agra : March 1998
  20. Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/Jat Clan in India,p. 266
  21. B. N. Puri, India under the Kusanas, p. 51.
  22. Mahendra Singh Arya et al: Adhunik Jat Itihas, p. 276
  23. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats The Ancient Rulers, p. 234-235
  24. Dr Pema Ram:Rajasthan Ke Jaton Ka Itihas, p.14
  25. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/A,pp.26 f.n 4
  26. The Ancient Geography of India/Taki,pp.179, 182-183
  27. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.197
  28. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.215-216
  29. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.216
  30. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.216
  31. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/J,p.376
  32. Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/Appendices/Appendix I,p.316
  33. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats The Ancient Rulers, p.188
  34. P C Bagchi, op. cit., p.133
  35. S. Chatopadhyaya, Ethnic History of North India, p.117
  36. S R Goyal, A history of Imperial Guptas, p. 57
  37. PC Bagchi, op. cit., p. 134
  38. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats The Ancient Rulers, p.189
  39. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats The Ancient Rulers, p.189 - 190
  40. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats The Ancient Rulers, p.190
  41. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats The Ancient Rulers, p.191
  42. The Ancient Geography of India/Eastern India,p.506
  43. Epigraphia Indica Vol. IX, p.290
  44. P.C. Roy Choudhoury: Temples and Legends of Bihar, Mundesvari, page2
  45. P.C. Roy Choudhoury: Temples and Legends of Bihar, Mundesvari, page3
  46. P.C. Roy Choudhoury: Temples and Legends of Bihar, Mundesvari, page4
  47. P.C. Roy Choudhoury: Temples and Legends of Bihar, Mundesvari, page4
  48. P.C. Roy Choudhoury: Temples and Legends of Bihar, Mundesvari, page4
  49. Epigraphia Indica Vol. IX, pp.289-290
  50. Chattopadhyay, Akkori, Bardhaman Jelar Itihas O Lok Sanskriti (History and Folk lore of Bardhaman District.), (Bengali), Vol I, p 33, Radical Impression. ISBN 81-85459-36-3
  51. Chattopadhyay, Akkori, Bardhaman Jelar Itihas O Lok Sanskriti (History and Folk lore of Bardhaman District.), (Bengali), Vol I, p 33, Radical Impression. ISBN 81-85459-36-3
  52. Chattopadhyay, Akkori, Bardhaman Jelar Itihas O Lok Sanskriti (History and Folk lore of Bardhaman District.), (Bengali), Vol I, p 33, Radical Impression. ISBN 81-85459-36-3
  53. Encyclopaedia of Jainism, Volume-1 By Indo-European Jain Research Foundation p.5530
  54. Ram Swarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter V, S.No.82
  55. Jat Samaj: Agra, October, 1993
  56. Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/Relationship with the Aryans,p. 118
  57. Kalhan: Rajatataraingini, VII,p.250
  58. Ramesh Chandra Gunarthi, Savar, Ajmer (1977): Rajasthani Jatiyon ki khoj
  59. by-Madho Singh Moond
  60. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204



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