Neerpura

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Neerpura (नीरपुरा) is a village and site of Jat Fort in Gohad tahsil of Bhind district of Madhya Pradesh. Neerpura had provided two Bamraulia Jat rulers to the Gohad state: Girdhar Pratap Singh (1755-1757) and Rana Kirat Singh (r.1803 - 1835).

Location

History

Various Jat clans had an important role in running the administration of Gohad state. The supreme power of the state vested in the King but the senior chieftains from Jat clans in-charge of various forts in the state used to keep a balance.

Rana Bhim Singh (1702-1755) became ruler of Gohad after death of his father Rana Jaswant Singh. Gohad became a powerful state in regime of Rana Bhim Singh. There were 125 chieftains looking after the affairs of various forts. Some prominent chieftains were: [1] (Ojha,p.60)

  1. Neerpura - Rao Balju
  2. Itayali - Kunwar Madho Singh
  3. Karwas - Hameer Singh
  4. Pipada - Vikramdutta
  5. Mudhaina - Kunwar Guman Singh


Samant Rao Baljoo of Neerpura was awarded with Jagir. Rana Gaj Singh , Rana of Gohad, eldest son of Rana Shri Bhagraj Singh, Rana of Gohad, had five sons:

Girdhar Pratap Singh (1755-1757) elected as Rana

Rana Bhim Singh had no son. Girdhar Pratap Singh fourth and youngest son of Samant Rao Balju was adopted by Rana Bhim Singh, and succeeded him on his death, 1756. But he could not rule for long as he expired in 1757. [2]

Kirat Singh elected as Rana

Maharaja Chhatra Singh Rana was issue less. After the death of Maharaja Chhatra Singh Rana in 1785 entire Gohad area turned into a symbol of anarchy, bloodshed and plunder which continued for 15 years. The Jat rebels could not be controlled either by Marathas or by the British. The revolutionary Jats unanimously declared Kirat Singh son of samant Tarachand of village Neerpura in 1803 as Rana of Gohad. Samant Tarachand was cousin of Rana Chhatar Singh. The coronation ceremony of Kirat Singh took place at ‘Bagathara fortress’, situated at a distance of 12 miles from Gohad, as Gohad and Gwalior were in possession of Sindhia at that time.[3] Thus installed at the Baghthara Fortress, near Gohad, Chait Sud Chodas, Samvat 1845. Restored to the greater part of Gohad by the British in 1803. Granted Dholpur, Bari and Rajakhera in compensation for the seizure of Gohad by the Scindia of Gwalior, December 1805. Established his capital at Dholpur, from which his new state took its name.[4]

References

  1. Jagaon Ki Pothi
  2. Dr. Ajay Kumar Agnihotri (1985) : Gohad ke jaton ka Itihas (Hindi), Nav sahitya Bhawan, New Delhi,p.25
  3. Dr. Ajay Kumar Agnihotri (1985) : Gohad ke jaton ka Itihas(Hindi), pp. 61-62
  4. http://www.4dw.net/royalark/India/dholpur2.htm

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