Sahaspur

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Author of this article is Laxman Burdak लक्ष्मण बुरड़क
Map of Kawardha district

Sahaspur (सहसपुर) is an ancient historical village in Kawardha tahsil of Kawardha district in Chhattisgarh. It is 12 miles to the south-west of Kawardha. Sahaspur is only 21 miles away from Chaura an another ancient place of historical importance. There is a record of Yasoraja, dated in the Kalachuri year 934, or A.D. 1182. The town gets name after Sahasrarjuna or Sahasrabâhu (Also known as Kartavirya Arjuna).

History

According to Dilip Singh Ahlawat [1], The Naga Jats ruled over Kantipur, Mathura, Padmavati, Kausambi, Nagpur, Champavati, (Bahgalpur) and in the central India, in western Malwa, Nagaur (Jodhpur- Rajasthan). In addition they ruled the ancient land of Shergarh, (Kotah Rajasthan), Madhya Pradesh (Central India), Chutiya Nagpur, Khairagarh, Chakra Kotiya and Kawardha. The great scholar, Jat Emperor, Bhoja Parmar, mother Shashiprabha was a maiden of a Naga Clan.

Sahaspur Statue Inscription of Yasoraja of Kalachuri year 934 (A.D. 1182)

Reference - Corpus Inscriptionium Indicarium Vol IV Part 2 Inscriptions of the Kalachuri-Chedi Era, Vasudev Vishnu Mirashi, 1905, p. 595

No 115 ; Plate XCV
Sahaspur Inscription of Yasoraja 1182 AD

This inscription was first brought to notice by Sir Richard Jenkins in the Asiatic Researches, Vol. XV, p 506. It was subsequently noticed by Sir A. Cunningham, who gave an account of its contents and the Christian equivalent of its date together with a photozincograph in his Archœologîcal Survey of India Reports Vol. XVII, pp 42-4, plate xxii. Its date was next examined by Dr Kielhorn in the Indian Antiquary Vol XVII, p. 217. The inscription is edited here for the first time from excellent ink impressions kindly supplied by Mr M A Suboor of the Central Museum, Nagpur.

The record is incised on the pedestal of a statue, locally known as that of Sahasrārjuna or Sahasrabāhu, which lies under a tamarind tree near a tank at Sāhaspur, 12 miles to the south-west of Kawardha, the chief town of a former feudatory state of the same name in Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh. It consists of four short lines followed by four half lines on the left and two half lines on the right. It is in a good state of preservation. The average size of the letters is 5". The characters are Nāgarî and the language Sanskrit. The only orthographical peculiarities, which call for notice, are the use of v for b in Valêr=.L-1 and of the palatal ś for the dental s in -sûnôh^ L-2

In the first four lines the inscription describes Yasôrāja whom the statue was intended to represent ; but the description is wholly conventional. The next four half lines on the left name his queen (Lakshmādevī), two sons (Bhojadeva & Rājadeva) and one daughter (Jāsalladevi). The date of the inscription is recorded in the two half lines on the right as the year 934 (expressed in decimal figures only), the fifteenth tîthi of the bright fortnight of Kārttika, Wednesday. This date must evidently be referred to the Kalachuri era and regularly corresponds to Wednesday, the 13th October 1182 A C. On that day the fifteenth night of the bright fortnight of Kàrttika in the expired Kalachuri year 934 ended 14 hours after mean sunrise.

As stated before, Yaśorāja was probably a feudatory of the Kalachuri kings of Ratanpur.

Text

१. वक्तृत्वे समतां सदा सुरगुरोर्द्दाने व(ब)लेर्भूभुज

२. लावण्ये मकरध्वजस्य गिरिजाशू(सू)नो सुशक्तौ स्थिति.।

३. प्रत्यायातरिपुश्च दुष्टमपि [य]स्तद्रक्षणे य शिवि (बि)

४. सोयं चात्र विराजते भुवि यशोराज जितारि स्वय(यम्)[॥१॥

५. राज्ञी श्रीलक्ष्मादेवी ॥ स्वस्ति सम्व[त्] ९३४

६. कुमारश्रीभोजदेव ॥ कार्तिक सुदि १५ वु(बु)धे ॥

७. कुमारश्रीराजदेव: ॥

८. कुमा[रि](री) [श्री]जासल्लदेवि(वी) ॥

Sahaspur Statue Inscription of Yasoraja of Kalachuri year 934 (A.D. 1182)[2]

Translation

Here on the earth shines that Yaśorāja himself, who has conquered his enemies, who has always attained equality with the preceptor of gods in eloquence, with the Bali in charity, with the crocodile-bannered (god of love) in beauty (and) with (Kartikeya) the son of Girijā in great strength, and who is Sibi in protecting even a wicked foe who comes back to him (for shelter).

(Line 5) The queen, the illustrious Lakshmādevī.
The prince, the illustrious Bhojadeva.
The prince, the illustrious Rājadeva.
The princess, the illustrious Jāsalladevi.

Hail ! (In) the year 934, on the 15th (lunar) day of the bright (fortnight) of Kārttika, on Wednesday.

Wiki Editor's note

The inscription mentions following names which are associated with Jat history or Jat clans:

  • Shivi (शिवी) - Shivi (शिवी) or Sibi (सिबी) or Sibia (सिबिया) is a gotra of Jats.
  • Jit (जित) - Jit (जित) or Jit (जिट) is term used for Jats by the English historian James Tod.
  • Yashoraja - Yashoraja has been identified by Vasudev Vishnu Mirashi [4] as a feudatory of the Kalachuri kings of Ratanpur. Mandava Mahal Inscription of Nagavanshi kings of Samvat 1406 (A. D. 1349) at Chaura gives the genealogy of Nagavanshi Jat rulers of Kawardha which starts from Ahiraja. In this list Yashoraja is mentioned at S.No. 15. Ramachandra is mentioned at S.No. 24 in this list, who constructed Shiva temple at Bhoramdeo in 1349 AD. There is a gap of 167 years and period of each generation comes about 19 years. This justifies that Yashoraja is from the dynasty of Nagavanshi Jat rulers of Kawardha.

External links

References

  1. Dilip Singh Ahlawat: Jat Viron ka Ithihass (Hindi)
  2. Corpus Inscriptionium Indicarium Vol IV Part 2 Inscriptions of the Kalachuri-Chedi Era, Vasudev Vishnu Mirashi, 1905, p. 595
  3. History and study of the Jats. By Professor B.S Dhillon. ISBN-10: 1895603021 or ISBN-13: 978-1895603026. p.126
  4. Corpus Inscriptionium Indicarium Vol IV Part 2 Inscriptions of the Kalachuri-Chedi Era, Vasudev Vishnu Mirashi, 1905, p. 595

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