Turvasu

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Genealogy of Ila
Ancestry of Yayati

Turvasu, In the dynasty of Yayati, was son of Yayati from Devayani, with whom Tomar gotra is related. Yayati had two wives Devayani and Sharmishtha.

Yayati got two sons from Devayani – 1. Yadu and 2. Turvasu.

Yayati got three sons from Sharmishtha – 1. Druhyu 2. Anu and 3. Puru. [1]

According to James Todd[2] One great arm of the tree of Yayati remains unnoticed, that of Uru or Urvasu, written by others Turvasu. Uru was the father of a line of kings who founded several empires. Virupa, the eighth prince from Uru, had eight sons, two of whom are particularly mentioned as sending forth two grand shoots, Druhyu and Bhabru. From Druhyu a dynasty was established in the north. Aradwat, with his son Gandhara, is stated to have founded a State : Prachetas is said to have become king of Mlecchhades, or the barbarous regions. This line terminated with Dushyanta, the husband of the celebrated Sakuntala, father of Bharat, and who, labouring under the displeasure of some offended deity, is said by the Hindus to have been the cause of all the woes which subsequenty befell the race. The four grandsons of Dushyanta, Kalanjar, Keral, Pand, and Chaul, gave their names to countries.

Rule of Turvasu

Yayati made Turvasu the rulers of westwrn region. The descendants of Turvasu were known as Turvasus, who founded Turvaski. Over a period of time Turvaski became Turski and finally Turky.

The ancestor of Tomars

The descendants of Turvasu, known as Turvasus changed due to linguistic differences to Turvas, Tavras, Tambar and Tomar. Due to political reasons Tomars returned from west region to south through Central Asia and settled in areas around Delhi known as Indraprastha. Since they had come from west, they have been called Yavanas in Sabha Parva of Mahabharata.

The Tomars spread from Delhi to other places in search of better lands and came upto Bhind in Madhya Pradesh. In the seventh century under the influence of new Hindu religion some of the tomars got inducted into Agnikula Rajputs. Rest who believed in old Vedic traditions remained in Jats.

References

  1. Genealogy of Yayati
  2. James Todd Annals/Chapter 4 Foundations of States and Cities by the different tribes, p.52

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