Aulikara

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Aulikara (औलीकर) (Aulikar) were an ancient Indian clan. Two royal houses belonging to this clan ruled over the present-day western Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh state from c. 350 CE to 550 CE.[1]

Aulikaras or Aulikas or Aulakhas are all the names of the Jat tribes.[2]

History

Epigraphical discoveries have brought to light two distinct royal houses, who call themselves as the Aulikaras and ruled from Dashapura (present-day Mandsaur). The first royal house, which ruled from Dashapura comprised the following kings in the order of succession:

The Risthal stone slab inscription discovered in 1983 has brought to light another royal house, which comprised the following kings in the order of succession:

In all probability, Yashodharma Vishnuvardhana also belonged to this house and he was the son and successor of Prakashadharma.[3] Yashodharma defeated Mihirakula and freed the Malwa region from the Hunas. The rule of the Aulikaras over Malwa ended with him.[4]

Origin of the Aulikaras

Nothing is mentioned about the origin of the Aulikaras or the Olikaras (as mentioned in the Bihar Kotra inscription of Naravarma) in their inscriptions. Based on the fact that, they used the Malava Samvat in preference to the use of Gupta era in all of their inscriptions in spite of their first royal house being a feudatory of the Guptas, a historian, D.C. Sircar assumed them as a clan of the Malavas. This clan settled in the Dasheraka region (present-day western Malwa) in the course of their migration from the North-West. His view was supported by K.K. Dasgupta and K.C. Jain.[5]

Jat connections

Hukum Singh Panwar (Pauria) [6] states that The Ephthalites (White Hunas), who came to India, comprised the Xun, (Jun) Hala, Halan, Jouan/Jouen, Jaria and Jauval or Johl tribes of Scythic origin. 116 one. Strenuous efforts were made by Virkas, Aulikaras and Dharanas (Jat tribes) to turn out and exterminatet the Huns from India, and yet some of the Huna tribes seem have been absorbed in the Jats. The existence of Joon, Hala, Hoon, Halani, Juria, Johl and Johi among the Jats leads us to surmise that the above mentioned Ephthalmite tribes, who must have managed to stay in North-Western India merged with the Jats and retained their ethnonyms.

References

  1. Jain, Kailash Chand (1972). Malwa Through the Ages. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass. pp. 250–9. ISBN 978-81-208-0824-9
  2. The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/The Jarta or Jartika or Jartrika theory, p.58
  3. Agarwal, Ashvini (1989). Rise and Fall of the Imperial Guptas, Delhi:Motilal Banrasidass, ISBN 81-208-0592-5, pp.250-6
  4. Jain, Kailash Chand (1972). Malwa Through the Ages. Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass. pp. 250–9. ISBN 978-81-208-0824-9
  5. Ojha, N.K. (2001). The Aulikaras of Central India: History and Inscriptions, Chandigarh: Arun Publishing House, ISBN 81-85212-78-3, pp.25-7
  6. The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/An Historico-Somatometrical study bearing on the origin of the Jats, p.136

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