Brihadratha

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Brihadratha (बृहद्रथ) or Maharatha was a Chandravanshi King of Magadha of the Paurava race, son of Uparichara (Vasu) of Chedi Kingdom.

Jat Gotras from Brihadratha

Mitan

History

He was the founder of the Barhadratha dynasty (c. 1700–799 BC), the earliest ruling dynasty of Magadha. According to the Mahabharata and the Puranas, he was the eldest of the five sons of Vasu, the Kuru king of Chedi.[1] and his queen Girika. The name of Brihadratha is also found in the Rigveda (I.36.18, X.49.6).[2]

Harsha Charita[3] mentions ....The fate of a Yavana king was encompassed by the holder of his golden chowrie, who read the letters of a document reflected in his crest jewel. By slashes of drawn swords Viduratha's army minced the avaricious Mathura king Brihadratha while he was digging treasure at dead of night.

Successors of Brihadratha

All the Puranas mention his brother (or son) Kushagra, as his successor. Kushagra was succeeded by his son Vrishava (or Rishava). Pushpavanta (or Pushyavanta or Punyavanta) was the son of Vrishava. Pushpavanta was succeeded by his son Satyahita (or Satyadhrita). Satyahita's son was Sudhanvana (or Sudharmana, Dharmatma of Dhanusha). Dhanusha was succeeded by his son Sarva (or Urja or Jatu or Jahu or Jantu). Sarva was succeeded by his son Sambhava. According to the Agni Purana, Sambhava was succeeded by his son Jarasandha, the noted warrior king mentioned in the Mahabharata. But all other Puranic genealogical lists mention the name of Brihadratha again between either Jantu and Jarasandha or Sambhava and Jarasandha. Jarasandha was succeeded by his son Sahadeva who was killed in the Kurukshetra war[1]

In Mahabharata

Adi Parva, Mahabharata/Mahabharata Book I Chapter 63 mentions:

And Vasu had five sons of great energy and immeasurable prowess. And the emperor installed his sons as governors of various provinces.

महारथॊ मगध राड विश्रुतॊ यॊ बृहद्रथः
परत्यग्रहः कुशाम्बश च यम आहुर मणिवाहनम
मच छिल्लश च यदुश चैव राजन्यश चापराजितः Mahabharata (1.63.29)

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Misra, V.S. (2007). Ancient Indian Dynasties, Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, ISBN 81-7276-413-8, pp.129-36
  2. Raychaudhuri, H.C. (1972). Political History of Ancient India, Calcutta: University of Calcutta, p.102
  3. The Harsha Charita of Bana/Chapter VI

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