Guleria

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Guleria (गुलेरिया)[1] Gularian (गुलरियां) [2] Gul (गुल)[3]Guleriya (गुलेरिया) Gularia (गुलरिया) Gulariya (गुलरिया) Guleriya (गुलेरिया) Goleria (गोलेरिया) gotra Jats are found Rajasthan, Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh. [4] Gul clan is found in Afghanistan.[5] Golera (गोलेरा)[6] clan is found in Pakistan which gives name to Guliana Rawalpindi.[7]Guler was an ancient Hill Kingdom in Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh. [8] This clan is also found in Rajputs. Guleria clan was an integral part of Chauhan Federation at the time of invasion of Mahmud of Ghazni (997-1030 AD).

Origin

Guleria clan gets name from ancient Kingdom Guler in Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh.

Villages founded by Guleria clan

History

Kangra District Map

The history of Guleria clan is available from 7th century. It is said that the Guler clan had a state in Himachal Pradesh about in 7th century. Guler state was situated to S.W. of Kangra. Its capital was Haripur Guler. The smaller chiefship of Guler was offshoot from the parent stem of Kangra. The independence of Guler, or Haripur, was established by Hari Chandra, about A.D. 1400, when he yielded Kangra to his younger brother, Karmma Chandra. [12]

Alexander Cunningham on Guler

Alexander Cunningham[13] describes about the Hill States of the Punjab as the Chinese pilgrim Hwen Thsang has noticed so few of the many hill-states of the Panjab.

According to popular opinion the petty states of the Alpine Panjab, at the present time, consist of twenty-two Muhammadan and twenty-two Hindu chiefships, the former lying to the west, and the latter to the east of the Chenab river. [14]

An older classification divides them into three groups, each named after the most powerful state which formed the head of the confederation[15]. These were:

This division into three groups most probably existed prior to the seventh century, as we find that the states to the east of the Ravi were quite independent of Kashmir, while those of Urasa, Punach, and Rajapuri are spoken of in such a way as to show that they had kings of their own previous to their subjection by Kashmir.[16]

The Gakar chiefs hold the lower valley of the Jhelam, and the upper course of the Haro river to the south-west of Kashmir. The Gakars also occupy several portions of the eastern Doab, as Guliana, near Gujar Khan, and Bugial, under the lofty hill of Balnath. But these districts do not properly belong to the hills, although they were subject to Kashmir at the time of Hwen Thsang's visit in the seventh century. [17]


Alexander Cunningham[18]provides us the list which gives the names and positions of the various states attached to the eastern, or Jalandhar (Trigartta) division of the Alpine Panjab.

Vansha State
Somvansi 1. Kangra, or Katoch.
2. Guler, to S.W. of Kangra.
3. Jaswal, on Suhan River.
4. Datarpur, on lower Bias River.
5. Siba, on lower Bias River.
Surajvansi 6.Chamba, on Ravi River.
7. Kullu, on upper Bias River.
Pundir, or Pandayas. 8.Mandi, on middle Bias River.
9. Sukhet, to south of Mandi.
10. Nurpur, between Ravi River and Bias River.
11. Kotila, to East of Nurpur.
12. Kotlehar.

Of these twelve states no less than five are mere subdivisions of the once rich kingdom of Jalandhar, which embraced the whole of the Doab, or plain country, between the Bias and Satlej, and all the hill country lying between the Ravi and the frontiers of Mandi and Sukket, to the south of the Dhaola-dhar mountains. This included Nurpur, Kotila, and Kotlehar ; and as Mandi and Sukhet were at first under one rule, there were originally only four chiefships in the eastern division of the Alpine Panjab, namely, Jalandhar, Chamba, Kullu, and Mandi.

Alexander Cunningham[19] writes that Since the occupation of the plains by the Muhammadans, the ancient kingdom of Jalandhara has been confined almost entirely to its hill territories, which were generally known by the name of Kangra, after its most celebrated fortress.

Alexander Cunningham[20] writes that The royal family of Jalandhara and Kangra is one of the oldest in India, and their genealogy from the time of the founder, Susarma Chandra, appears to have a much stronger claim to our belief than any one of the long strings of names now shown by the more powerful families of Rajasthan. All the different scions of this house claim to be of Somavanshi descent ; and they assert that their ancestors held the district of Multan and fought in the Great War on the side of Duryodhan against the five Pandu brothers. After the war they lost their country, and retired under the leadership of Susarma Chandra to the Jalandhar Doab, where they established themselves, and built the stronghold of Kangra.

Alexander Cunningham writes that In the seventh century, the Chinese pilgrim, Hwen Thsang, was courteously entertained for a whole month by Raja U-ti-to, or Udita,[21] whom I would identify with Adima of the genealogical lists. One hundred and sixty years later, in an inscription dated A.D. 804, the Raja of Jalandhara is named Jaya Chandra, who is the Jaya Malla Chandra of the lists, the seventh in descent from Adima. Lastly, Ananta, king of Kashmir, from A.D. 1028 to 1081, married two daughters of Indu Chandra, [22] Raja of Jalandhara, who is the Indra Chandra of the genealogical lists of Kangra. These instances are sufficient to show that Jalandhara existed as an independent State for many centuries before the Muhammadan conquest. [23]

The smaller chiefships of Guler, Jaswal, Datarpur, and Siba, are offshoots from the parent stem of Kangra. The independence of Guler, or Haripur, was established by Hari Chandra, about A.D. 1400, when he yielded Kangra to his younger brother, Karmma Chandra. [24]

The date of the foundation of the other principalities is unknown, but I believe that they were always tributary to the parent state until the time of the Muhammadans, when the capture of Kangra by Mahmud of Ghazni afforded them an opportunity of asserting their independence. [25]

Raja Utito, mentioned by Chinese pilgrim Hwen Thsang, was a tributary of Harsh Vardhana, who appear to have continued to rule over the country right up to the 12th century, with occasional interruptions, but their capital was Jalandhar and Kangra formed an important stronghold.

We find in above description provided by Alexander Cunningham that Guliana Rawalpindi (p.132) represented by Mohammadans and Guler state to S.W. of Kangra (p.136) represented by Hindu chiefs of Guler. We may believe that these were the ancestors of Guleria clan.

H.A. Rose on Goleria

H.A. Rose[26] writes that the ancient ruling family of Datarpur belongs to Dadwal Rajput clan are said to take its name from Dada in Kangra on the Hoshiarpur border. The Dadwals are found in the neighbourhood of Datarpur, the seat of their former sovereignty, and on the south-west face of the Siwaliks in Hoshiarpur tahsil near Dholbaha and Jatiauri or Jankapuri, its ancient name, which is still used. Janak was an ancient Surajbansi ruler. The Dadwals are a branch of the Katoch and do not intermarry with them, or with the Golerias or Sibāyas on the ground of a common descent. They have an interesting local history which describes how they wrested the tract round Datarpur from a Chahng rāni.


H.A. Rose[27] writes: Golera (गोलेरा), a tribe which gives its name to the tract in Rawalpindi so called. It is descended from its eponym, the third son of Qutb Shah, and in Sialkot has four branches, Golera, Kahambdrah, Dengla and Mandu.

I : GoleraBinduTurDongla + Mandu

II : GoleraBinduBanjurBharahwia + Samduh + (SingiKahambirah)

According to Cracroft the Golera are Awans, a statement confirmed by their claim to descend from Qutb Shah.

Goleria (गोलेरिया), an offshoot of the great Rajput clan, the Katoch, bearing a territorial designation from Goler.


In Rajatarangini

Rajatarangini[28] tells that The king Jayasimha (1128 - 1155 AD) of Kashmir killed the rebellious Chhuḍḍa, the younger brother of the lord of Koundha by secret punishment. The king also destroyed Vikramaraja and other kings in Vallapura &c., and raised Guhlaṇa and others to sovereignty. This sun among sovereigns, enriched honorable men out of his affection for them by giving them possession of beautiful lands in Kanyakubja and other places. (p.219) (GuhlaṇaGuleria)


Rajatarangini [29] tells that ...The two girls whom the Damara had wished to give to Bhoja of Kashmira, were given by him to Parmmadi and Gulhana, sons of the king, now that Bhoja was worsted. (p.270) (GulhanaGuleria)

Gulhana made king of Lohara

Rajatarangini[30] tells.... The king then anointed Gulhana, the eldest of the sons of Raḍḍādevi, as king of the prosperous kingdom of Lohara. That prince was aged six or seven years, and he surpassed older kings, as a young mango tree surpasses worn out trees. As the queen Raḍḍā went to anoint her son, the feudatory kings bowed to her, and reddened her feet by the rays of the rubies on their heads, as if by red paint. When the prince was anointed, the clouds, as if in compliance with, the wishes of the queen, drenched the earth which had been dried up by a fearful drought. [VIII (ii), p.306]

H. W. Bellew

H. W. Bellew[31] writes that the Khattak are two great divisions — Torman and Bolac. Torman, or Turan, is in two divisions — Tari and Taraki. Tari section includes Gul, who are for Goel or Gohil Chohan.

History of Guler state

Guler was a small precolonial Indian hill state in the Lower Himalayas. Its capital was the town of Haripur Guler, in modern-day Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh. The kingdom was founded in 1415 by Raja Hari Chand, a scion of the ancient royal family of Kangra. Raja Hari Chand, 1st Raja of Guler 1415 AD, he was originally the Raja of Kangra to 1415, but whilst hunting one day, he fell into a dry well, and was presumed dead, his brother was then named Raja of Kangra; he was eventually discovered, but rather than fight over his rights, he founded the town of Haripur on the flat below the fort, on the Banganga River; married and had issue.[32]

In 1813 Guler State was annexed to British India, after a brief period of Jat Sikh rule under Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Bhup Singh (1765 - d. 1826) was the last ruling Raja. He accepted a jagir in Nandpur in 1826. The jagir was recognized by the British government in 1853. In 1877 his son Shamsher Singh died without male heirs and the state lapsed.

The rulers of Guler state

Guleria History in Rajasthan

History of Guleria clan from year 1573 AD is recorded by Pitha Ram Guleria in Sujangarh Jat Samaj Nirdeshika, 2015,pp.5-7. It states that two Guleria brothers developed differences with the thakur of Ladariya in Didwana tahsil of Nagaur district in Rajasthan over the issue of Tax collection. They came near the border of Jodhpur State and founded Gulerion Ki Dhani in 1573 AD at present Sujangarh where there was good soil and drinking water. When their population increased the Guleria people changed the name hamlet to 'Kharbuji Dhani' after person named Kharbuji Guleria in 1723 AD. Later thakur of Sandwa Churu constructed a fort here and it was called Kot Kharbuja/Kharbuji Kot/Kharbuji Ra Kot.[33] Its name changed to Sujangarh after Sujan Singh who became ruler of Bikaner[34] in 1737 AD.[35]

It is matter of research how and when they came from Kangra (Himachal Pradesh) to Ladariya in Didwana tahsil of Nagaur district in Rajasthan. It is likely that they migrated after the invasion of Mahmud of Ghazni (997 to 1030 AD).

Jat Monuments by Guleria clan

Jat Mandir Sujangarh

1. जाट मंदिर - गुलेरिया परिवार का एक भाई सुजानगढ़ से जाकर सालासर बस गए बाकि जाट मंदिर के पास बस गए। विक्रम संवत 1935 में दुलिया गाँव से कृष्ण की मूर्ति लाकर जाट मंदिर बनाया।[36]

2. गुलेरिया सती मंदिर - संवत 1808 (1751 ई.) में सेवाराम गुलेरिया का देहांत हुआ तब उनकी पत्नी सती हुई जो आज एफ.सी.आई. गोदाम के पास सती मंदिर है। वर्ष 1969 में जब एफ.सी.आई. का निर्माण हुआ तो उस समय सतीमाता के मंदिर के लिए स्थान नहीं छोडने के कारण निर्माण अवरूद्ध हो गया तब एफ.सी.आई. ने मंदिर के लिए अलग स्थान छोडकर निर्माण करवाया। [37]

3. नाथोजी गुलेरिया का तालाब - संवत 1835 (1778 ई.) में सुजानसिंह के नाम से गाँव का नाम सुजानगढ़ रखा गया। इसी संवत के आस पास नाथोजी गुलेरिया ने पशुओं के पीने के लिए नाथो तालाब खुदवाया।[38]

4. श्याम मंदिर - खाटू श्याम में निर्माणाधीन

सुजानगढ़ में गुलेरिया गोत्र का इतिहास

सुजानगढ़ को बसाने वाले गुलेरिया गोत्र का यह इतिहास पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 5-7, से साभार लिया गया है।

सुजानगढ़ के इतिहास में प्रथम आधार-शिला समाज के गुलेरिया गोत्र के पूर्वजों ने रखी थी। विक्रम संवत 1630 (=1573 ई.) में डीडवाना मोलासर के पास लादड़िया गांव से जाट गुलेरिया परिवार के दो भाईयों की ठाकुर के साथ लाग-बाग के संबंध में अनबन हो गई जिससे वे गाँव छोडकर निकल गए। ठाकुर ने यह दवाब बनाया कि जो लादड़िया गांव में रहेगा उसको ठाकुर की जय बोलनी पड़ेगी। इस संबंध में एक लोकोक्ति प्रचलित है - लादड़िया में रहीं जको जय ठाकुर की कहीं। स्वाभिमानी जाटों को यह मंजूर नहीं था सो बैल गाड़ियों में सामान डालकर अनजान स्थान के लिए रवाना हो गए। ठाकुर ने कहा कि जा तो रहे हो परंतु जोधपुर रियासत में नहीं बसने दूँगा। जसवंतगढ़ में आकर पूछा तो पता चला कि जोधपुर रियासत सामने पड़े ताल में समाप्त होती है। यह बिकानेर रियासत का इलाका था। यहीं गुलेरिया जाटों ने डेरा डाला। यह क्षेत्र मांडोता ठाकुर का बीदासर जागीर के अधीन था। ताल की बंजर जमीन जहां गुलेरिया जाट बसे वह वर्तमान गांधी चौक के इर्द-गिर्द थी।[39]

मांडोता गाँव के दयालदासोत मारवाड़ के समीप के गांवों में डाका डालकर आ जाते थे। गोपालपुरा और व मांडोता के आपस में अनबन चलती थी जिसके कारण चार परिवार क्रमस: बासनीवाल (प्रजापत), मेघवाल (मेहरड़ा), नाई (टोकसिया) और माली (सांखला) ये गुलेरियों की ढ़ाणी के पास आकार बस गए। जो 'पंच ढ़ाणी' के नाम से कहलाए। 'पंच ढ़ाणी' गैर आबाद थी तथा जोधपुर- बीकानेर रियासत की सीमा पर होने से बीकानेर महाराजा विशेष ध्यान रखते थे। कहते हैं की 'पंच ढ़ाणी' में भी जब लूट-पाट होने लगी तब बीदासर जाकर बताने पर बीकानेर महाराज की ओर से 'पंच ढ़ाणी' के पहरे पर चार घुड़सवार भिजवाए जो एक साल तक यहाँ रहे। सुरक्षा व खेती की उपजाऊ जमीन पर बीकानेर महाराजा का वृद्धहस्त देख कर आस-पास के गावों से लोग आकार बसने लगे। ताल की जमीन में 5-6 फुट खोदने पर मीठा पनी निकलता था जिससे सिंचाई कर दो फसल व सब्जी भी खूब होती थी। [40]

एक बार मांडोता के दयालदासोता मारवाड़ से लूट के साथ हकीम का हाथी लेकर आ गए, हाथी तो वापस लौटा दिया परंतु जोधपुर की सेना ने चढ़ाई कर दी। मांडोता, कालिया गाँव में घेरा डालकर लूट-पाट की जिसमें रंजिश के कारण गोपालपुरा ने भी साथ दिया तथा गांवों को जला दिया। इस प्रकार ठाकुर फतेहसिंह के हाथ से जागीर चली गई। इस झगड़े में फतेहसिंह व उनके 25 भाई बंधु और एक भाटी जुंझार सिंह ने वीरगती पाई। दयालदासोता के बचे परिवार को बीदासर ठाकुर ने कोडासर में बसाया तथा बीदासर की नौकरी में रहे। फतेहसिंह के साथ काम आए जुझार सिंह पर भी छतरी बनी जिसका पत्थर आज भी आई. टी. आई. कालेज में लगा है। इसके ठीक सामने संवत 1679 (1622 ई.) में महासती दयालदास आसकरणजोत सजना मोहिल पर छतरी बनवाई। मांडोता, कालिया गाँव इस झगड़े में बिलकुल मिट गए। इनके अवशेष अब भी खुदाई में मिलते हैं। दोनों गांवों के अधिकतर लोग 'पंच ढ़ाणी' में आकार बस गए। [41]

गुलेरिया परिवार के गुलोजी ने गुलेरिया गाँव बसाया। 'पंच ढ़ाणी' के गुलेरिया परिवार के भाई ने हरयाणा में खैर गाँव बसाया जहां आज 100 से ज्यादा गुलेरिया परिवार हैं। 'पंच ढ़ाणी' की आबादी बढने पर ख़रबुज़ी गुलेरिया के नाम से संवत 1780 (1723 ई.) में ढ़ाणी का नाम ख़रबुज़ी रख दिया तथा लोग नया बाजार तक मुख्य सड़क पर बस गए। सांडवा ठाकुर ने यहाँ पर एक गढ़ बनवाया तब इसका नाम ख़रबुज़ी कोट या ख़रबूज़ी रा कोट हो गया। [42]

मीठा पानी और अच्छी खेती के कारण संवत 1797 (1740 ई.) में गुलेरिया परिवार के भांजे राजियासर गाँव से बिजारणिया परिवार को बसाया। संवत 1816 (1759 ई.) में दूसरे भांजे खीचड़ परिवार को निबी जोधा से लाकर बसाया। [43]

संवत 1808 (1751 ई.) में सेवाराम गुलेरिया का देहांत हुआ तब उनकी पत्नी सती हुई जो आज एफ.सी.आई. गोदाम के पास सती मंदिर है। वर्ष 1969 में जब एफ.सी.आई. का निर्माण हुआ तो उस समय सतीमाता के मंदिर के लिए स्थान नहीं छोडने के कारण निर्माण अवरूद्ध हो गया तब एफ.सी.आई. ने मंदिर के लिए अलग स्थान छोडकर निर्माण करवाया। [44]

विक्रम संवत 1545 (1488 ई.) में बीकानेर रियासत की स्थापना राव बिकाजी ने पाण्डू गोदारा से राज तिलक करवाकर नेराजी जाट की भूमि पर बीकानेर नाम से राजधानी स्थापित की। मूलस्थान नेराजी का होने से राजधानी का नाम बिकानेर हुआ। महाराजा सूरतसिंह बीकानेर ने सांडवा ठाकुर से ख़रबूज़ी कोट ले लिया जिसके बदले दूसरी भूमि देदी। संवत 1835 (1778 ई.) में सुजानसिंह के नाम से गाँव का नाम सुजानगढ़ रखा गया। इसी संवत के आस पास नाथोजी गुलेरिया ने पशुओं के पीने के लिए नाथो तालाब खुदवाया।[45]

संवत 1879 (1822 ई.) में राज्य ईस्ट इंडिया कंपनी के साथ जुडने से अङ्ग्रेज़ी सरकार की मदद से जागीरदारों के आतंक से मुक्त करने के लिए सुजानगढ़ में अङ्ग्रेज़ी रेजीमेंट शेखावाटी ब्रिगेड रहने लगी। बीदासर व अन्य जागीरदारों को दबाने के लिए कई बार सेना भी भेजी। इस बदलती परिस्थिति में सुजानगढ़ सुरक्षा के दृष्टिकोण से एक महत्वपूर्ण स्थान बन गया। जिसका नतीजा यह हुआ कि आस-पास के गांवों से लोग आकार बसे। महाराजा डूंगरसिंह ने राजाजी की कोठी बनाकर सुजानगढ़ को निजामत बना दिया। जोधपुर सीमा पर स्थित होने से राजनैतिक और व्यापारिक महत्व बढ़ गया जिससे इर्द-गिर्द के गांवों से बनिए यथा जजोदिया, मंगलूणिया, फतेहपुरिया, शोभासरिया, सेठिया आदि भी आकर व्यापार करने लगे। ख़रबूज़ी कोट व सुजानगढ़ हमेशा ही खालसा रहा जिस पर बीकानेर दरबार का सीधा नियंत्रण था। कोई जागीरदार नियुक्त नहीं थे। यहाँ के चौधरी ही लाग-बाग इकट्ठी कर राज दरबार को भिजवाते थे। [46]

Distribution in Rajasthan

Villages in Sikar district

Rampura Sikar,

Villages in Churu district

Chhapar Churu (10), Guleriya Sujangarh, Salasar Balaji, Sujangarh (153),

Distribution in Madhya Pradesh

Villages in Ratlam district

Villages in Ratlam district with population of Guleriya (गुलेरिया) gotra are:

Jharsandala 1,

Distribution in Haryana

Distribution in Uttar Pradesh

Villages in Budaun district

Villages in Bareilly district

Villages in Jyotiba Phule Nagar district

Distribution in Bihar

Trigarta (Trigart Raje) Dynasty (BC unknown) mentioned as rulers of Magadha are:

Notable persons

  • Ishwar Ram Guleria - From village Guleriya Sujangarh, Churu, freedom fighter and social worker
  • Pitha Ram Guleria - Social worker and Retd. Accounts Officer. Address: Pragati Nagar, Behind Petrol Pump, Sujangarh, Churu, Rajasthan. PIN:331507, Mob: 9460075841, 7742775427
  • B. L. Guleria - Retd. DEO State Excise Deptt, DOB: 13.2.1953. Near Jat Mandir, Sujangarh, Churu, Present Address : B-136, Tara Marg, Hanuman Nagar, Jaipur, Phone: 0141-2351350, Mob: 7230000001, Email: guleriaexcise@gmail.com
  • Dr Bhagirath Singh Guleria - Guleria Nursing Home, Hisar Road, Sirsa, Haryana, Ph:01666-231323, Mob:09416048323.[48]
  • Dr Sarita Guleria (now Isharwal) - Bhumika Hospital, Fatehpur Road, Sikar, Ph:01572-259222, Mob: 9414260646. [49]

Gallery of Guleria people

References

  1. Dr Pema Ram:‎Rajasthan Ke Jaton Ka Itihas, p.299
  2. Dr Pema Ram:‎Rajasthan Ke Jaton Ka Itihas, p.299
  3. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. ग-81
  4. Mahendra Singh Arya et al.: Adhunik Jat Itihas, Agra 1998,
  5. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan By H. W. Bellew, p.108
  6. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/G,p. 301-302
  7. Alexander Cunningham:The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,p.132
  8. Alexander Cunningham: The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,pp.130-136
  9. Pitha Ram Guleria, Sujangarh Jat Samaj Nirdeshika, 2015, p.5
  10. James Todd Annals, Vol 1, p.146
  11. Churu Janpad Ka Jat Itihas by Daulat Ram Saran Dalman
  12. Alexander Cunningham: The Ancient Geography of India,p.139
  13. The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,pp.130-136
  14. Alexander Cunningham:The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,pp.130
  15. Alexander Cunningham:The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,pp.131
  16. Alexander Cunningham:The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,pp.131
  17. Alexander Cunningham:The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,p.132
  18. Alexander Cunningham:The Ancient Geography of India/Singhapura,pp.136
  19. The Ancient Geography of India,p.136
  20. The Ancient Geography of India,p.138
  21. Julien's ' Hiouen Thsang,' i. 261.
  22. ' Raja Tarangini,' vii. 150
  23. Alexander Cunningham: The Ancient Geography of India,p.139
  24. Alexander Cunningham: The Ancient Geography of India,p.139
  25. Alexander Cunningham: The Ancient Geography of India,p.139
  26. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/D, p.217
  27. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/G,p. 301-302
  28. Kings of Kashmira Vol 2 (Rajatarangini of Kalhana)/Book VIII (ii), p.219
  29. Kings of Kashmira Vol 2 (Rajatarangini of Kalhana)/Book VIII (ii), p.270
  30. Kings of Kashmira Vol 2 (Rajatarangini of Kalhana)/Book VIII (ii),p.306
  31. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan,p.108
  32. Guler Princely State
  33. Pitha Ram Guleria, Sujangarh Jat Samaj Nirdeshika, 2015, p. 5
  34. James Todd Annals, Vol 1, p.146
  35. Churu Janpad Ka Jat Itihas by Daulat Ram Saran Dalman
  36. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 7
  37. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 6
  38. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 6
  39. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 5
  40. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 5
  41. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 5
  42. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 6
  43. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 6
  44. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 6
  45. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 6
  46. पीथाराम गुलेरिया, सुजानगढ़ जाट समाज निर्देशिका, 2015, पृ. 6
  47. Ministry Of Home Affairs (Public Section), Padma Awards Directory (1954-2013), Year-Wise List
  48. Pitha Ram Guleria, Sujangarh Jat Samaj Nirdeshika, 2015, p. 77
  49. Pitha Ram Guleria, Sujangarh Jat Samaj Nirdeshika, 2015, p. 77

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