Kasha

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Author:Laxman Burdak, IFS (R)

Kasha (काश) is name of a place mentioned by Panini in Ashtadhyayi (4.2.80.5). H. W. Bellew[1] mentions the Kasha river of Tirah, where it is joined by the Hangu stream, in Miranzai of Kohat Pakistan.

Mention by Panini

Kasha (काश) is name of a place mentioned by Panini in Ashtadhyayi under Kashadi (काशादि) (4.2.80.5) group. [2]


Kasha (काश) is mentioned by Panini in Ashtadhyayi. [3]

History

Bhim Singh Dahiya[4] relates Kasha with Kaswa (कसवा) Jat clan....Otto Maenchen Helfen has rightly endorsed the earlier view that "the five chiefs, among them, the Kushanas, were great feudatories, dependent on their king, the Yue-che chief, and were of his nationality."95 He has further stated that the Kusha of the Kushanas were settled in the northern Tarim valley long before the Kushana Empire was founded.

"It is noteworthy that Kuca was known as Kusha or Kusanin Uighur texts and Koshan in the history by Rashiduddin.96 Further, the Sassanid Emperor Shahpuhr I (241-272 A.D.) is known to have fought with the Kushanas and he is credited with the conquest of Kasha (कश), the south-western part of Transoxiana with Bukhara in the centre. It is this word Kas, from which Kasvan or Ksavan has come. This was the place of Kasvans (Kusanas). And it is this area that is called 'Kasua' in the Kushana inscription of Panjtar of the year 122, first day of the month of Shravana.97 This was the area which was made an auspicious ground by Moika. It is important to note that the Chinese word for these people, Hoa or Hua, has the pronunciation of the first letter 'h' as 'X' and 'kh'. So, the word Hoa becomes XOA and its plural form XOAN, which is the same as Sogdian "XWN", i.e., KSEVAN, meaning a "king". The Iranian name for Hunas is Hyaona (Avesta) and 'Khiyon' (Pehlavi). It is from the Avestan Hyaona that the Indian Huna has come. "As a matter of fact, the name of the Hunas, having a guttral aspirated stop in the beginning which resembled the Iranian consonant X or KH" makes our point clear.98 From the Pehlavi form of this word, viz., "Khiyon"-the European name for these people-"Khion", "Khionites", etc., have come. The Khionite clan Chol attacked by Yazdegird III in 440 A.D. or so, is the same as the modern Chahl Jats. They were defeated in Dahistan, which of course is named after Dahiya Jats.99


95. JAOS, 1945, p. 72-73.

96. IA. 1934, p. 59, quoted by Buddha Prakash. SIH & C, p. 290.

97. EI, Vol. XIV. p. 134.

98. SIH&C, p. 306.

99. See J. Harquart, Eran Sahr, p. 56.


H. W. Bellew[5] writes that Gharbun is the name of the main branch of the Khankai or Kasha river of Tirah, where it is joined by the Hangu stream, in Miranzai of Kohat.

Jat clans

In Mahabharata

References

  1. [[An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan/Page 101-125|An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan,p.114
  2. V. S. Agrawala: India as Known to Panini, 1953, p.502
  3. V. S. Agrawala: India as Known to Panini, 1953, p.214
  4. Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/The Jats,p.36
  5. [[An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan/Page 101-125|An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan,p.114

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