Vikramaditya

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Vikramaditya (विक्रमादित्य) was a legendary 1st century BCE Emperor of Ujjain, India, famed for his wisdom, valour and magnanimity. According to the Pratisarga Parvan of Bhavisya Purana, he was the second son of Ujjain's King Gandharvasena of Paramara dynasty. Vikramaditya was born on 102 BC and died on 15 AD.[1] Bhartrhari (भर्तृहरि) was the elder son of King Gandharva-Sena.

Vikram era started in 57 BC by Vikramaditya as a commemoration of his victory upon the Shakas.

According to the above descriptions Vikramaditya lived for 117 years (102 BC - 15 AD).

It could be logically guessed that Vikramaditya should have been at least 45 years old when he totally defeated all the Shakas. According to Bhavishya Purana he was born in 3000 Kali era; so he established his Vikram era in (3000+45) 3045 Kali era. Vikram era is 57 BC. Thus, the beginning of kaliyuga comes to 3045 + 57 = 3102 BC.[2]

Vikram Samvat calendar

The Vikram Samvat or Bikram Samwat is the calendar said to have been founded by the emperor Vikramaditya[3] following his victory over the Sakas in 56 BCE, although it is popularly (and incorrectly) associated with the subsequent king Chandragupta Vikramaditya. It is a lunar calendar based on ancient Hindu tradition and is currently the official calendar of Nepal.

Bhartari or Bhartrhari (भर्तृहरि) was the elder son of King Gandharva-Sena, and received the kingdom of Ujjain from The celestial god Indra and the King of Dhara.[4][5] Much of the details about the lives of Bharthari and his brother Vikramaditya are from the tales of Baital Pachisi (Twenty five tales of Baital), translated as 'Vikram and The Vampire' by Sir Richard Francis Burton in 1870.

Bhartrhari

When Bhartrhari was king of 'Ujjayani' (modern day Ujjain) in his state there lived a Brahman who after years of austerities was given the fruit of immortality from the celestial tree of Kalpavriksha. The Brahman presented the same to his monarch, Raja Bhartrhari, who in turn, passed it on to his love, the beautiful, Pinglah Rani or Ananga Sena (as per Maha Kavi Kalidas), Raja Bhartrhari's last and youngest wife. The queen, being in love with the Head police officer of the state, Mahipala, presented the fruit to him, who further passed it on to his beloved, Lakha, one of the maids of honour. Eventually, Lakha being in love with the king presented the fruit back to the king. Having completed the circle, the fruit revealed the downsides of infidelity to the king, he summoned the queen and ordered her beheading, and ate the fruit himself. After that he abdicated the throne, to his younger brother Vikramaditya, and became a religious mendicant.[6][7]

External links

References

  1. H.D. Dharm Chakravarty Swami Prakashanand Saraswati. Encylopedia Of Authentic Hinduism The True History and the Religion of India,Hardbound, 2nd Edition, 2003 ,ISBN: 0967382319 Retrieved 2015-01-21
  2. H.D. Dharm Chakravarty Swami Prakashanand Saraswati. Encylopedia Of Authentic Hinduism The True History and the Religion of India,Hardbound, 2nd Edition, 2003 ,ISBN: 0967382319 Retrieved 2015-01-21
  3. The Encyclopædia of India and of Eastern and Southern Asia by Edward Balfour, B. Quaritch 1885, p.502
  4. Introduction Vikram and The Vampire by Richard Francis Burton, 1870.
  5. Footnote 13 Vikram and The Vampire by Richard Francis Burton, 1870.
  6. Introduction Vikram and The Vampire by Richard Francis Burton, 1870.
  7. The Sikh Religion, Volume 1 Max Arthur Macauliffe [1842-1913], Oxford University Press [1909]. Chapter XIV.