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Author:Laxman Burdak, IFS (R)
Location of Bhakkar in Pakistan
Location of Bhakkar

Bhakkar (Hindi: भक्कर, Urdu: بھکر, Seraiki Bakhar : بکھر) is a city and district in the Punjab province of Pakistan.


It lies on the left bank of the Indus river.


Probably it gets name from Bhakar Jat clan.

Tahsils in the District

Jat Gotras

Click to see Jat Gotras in Bhakkar

Major tribes

The Kharotha Khel are a Pathan tribe living in Deli Namdar, Tehsil Kalurkot, Bhakkar District. The tribe is a subtribe of the Daulat Khel with established linkages that of Nawab of Issa Khel and Nawab of Tank, with land holdings in Bhakkar District. They settled here after the Third Battle of Panipat (1761). They also fought against the Sikhs at the 1821 siege of Mankera, with the Sadozai Nawab, of the area of Dera Ismail Khan. the khans families are mainly living in Klur kot that are basically Baluch khans. these khans basically belongs to Afghanistan but from 1300 and after it they shifted here. the famous satti saleem khan was the main tribe in bhakkar before and in british empire. the families of saleem khan are living in village of ratri.

Siraiki is the main language spoken by majority of the people in Bhakkar District. Other languages spoken are Punjabi, Urdu and Pushto. Main tribes of the District are Aheer, Zurkani Baloch , Cheena, Shahani Baloch, Niwani baloch, Nutkani baloch, Chaandia Baloch, Rajput, Sheikh, Ansari, Musti Khel, Chaddu, Niazi, Khanan Khel, Chadrar, Dhandala, Kharotha Khel, Sandhila ,Utra and Kahawar, Aura & Aulakh, Baleli (بلیلی), Malana (jatt), Junjh, Goraya, Joya, Chadram, Jhamat, Raan


V. S. Agrawala[1] writes that Ashtadhyayi of Panini mentions janapada Apakara (अपकर) - Identified with Bhakkar in Mianwali district.

Bhakkar was founded probably towards the close of the fifteenth century by a body of colonists from Dera Ismail Khan. The Imperial Gazetteer of India described the town as follows:[2]

"It stands on the edge of the Thal or sandy plain overlooking the low-lying alluvial lands along; the river, a channel of which is navigable as far as Bhakkar during the floods. To the west of the town the land is low, well cultivated, and subject to inundation, while to the east the country is high and dry, treeless, and sandy. A rich extent of land irrigated from wells lies below the town, protected by embankments from inundations of the Indus, and produces two or three crops in the year. The neighbouring riverain is full of date groves and fruit gardens; and in it stands a famous mango-tree, the fruit of which used to be sent to Kabul in the old days of Afghan rule."

Notable persons


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