Mianwali

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Author:Laxman Burdak, IFS (R)
Location of Mianwali in Pakistan

Mianwali (Hindi: मियांवाली, Urdu: میانوالی) is city and District situated in the north-west of Punjab province, Pakistan. The city is located on the eastern bank of the Indus River. In November 1901, present day towns of Mianwali, Bhakkar, Isa Khel, Kalabagh, and Kundian were separated from Bannu District and hence a new district named as Mianwali District was created with the headquarters in Mianwali city.

Tahsils in the District

Jat clans in Mianwali District

According to 1911 census, the following were the principal Muslim Jat clans in Mianwali District[1]:

Ahir (521), Arar (678), Asar (678), Asran (662), Auler Khel (2,214), Aulakh (386), Aulara (1,915), Awan (3,614), Alakh (837), Bains or Waince (726), Bhatti (2,229), Bhachar (203), Bhidwal(1,295), Bhutta (545), Bhandar (589), Bhawan (593), Brakha (579), Bhamb (1,552), Chadhar (1,286), Chhina (3,076), Chahura (587), Chajri (594), Dharal (738), Dhal (1,471), Dhudhi (1, 114), Dhillon (?), Ghallu (1,478), Ghunera (1,279), Gorchi (1,054), Heer (1,034), Hansi (691), Janjua (986), Jakhar (1,424), Jhammat (462), Johiya ( 1,650), Jora (730), Khar (1,013), Khengar (1,555), Khokhar (3,126), Kundi (1,338), Kalu (1,582), Kohawer (496), Kanera (863), Kharal (646), Kalhar (600), Khichi (532), Kanial (785), Langah (626), Makal (562), Mallana (616), Unu (777), Pumma (893), Sahi (515), Samtia (77), Sangra (653), Saand (554), Sandhila (41), Sial (2,187), Sandi (981), Soomra or Soomro (611), Targar (3,011), Turkhel (255), Talokar (1,274),

History

Early history of the city is unknown. The city is famous for the shrine of Mian Sultan Zakria (RA) whose father Mian Ali founded Mianwali village in the 16th century. The son is said to have exhibited supernatural powers from an early age and many miraculous deeds are ascribed to him. His name is frequently taken as an oath and his shrine is not uncommonly the scene of settlement of civil disputes.

Notable persons

External links

References

  1. Census Of India 1911 Volume xiv Punjab Part 2 by Pandit Narikishan Kaul

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