Narayanpal

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Author of this article is Laxman Burdak लक्ष्मण बुरड़क
Map of Bastar district

Narayanpal (नारायणपाल) is a village in Jagdalpur tahsil of Bastar district in Chhattisgarh. It is 23 miles west of Jagdalpur.

Narayanpal Stone inscription of Queen Gunda-mahadevi, the mother of Somesvaradeva (Nagavanshi) 1111 AD

Source - Epigraphia Indica Vol. IX (1907-08): A S I, Edited by E. Hultzsoh, Ph.D. & Sten Konow, Ph.D.,pp. 161-62

Narayanpal is a village 23 miles west of Jagdalpur. The inscription is on a stone slab and is in Nagari characters, and the language is Sanskrit. It records the grant of the village Narayanapura to the god Narayana and some land near the Khajjuri tank to the god Lokesvara, and it is dated in the Saka year 1033 on Wednesday, the full moon-day of the Karttika month in the Khara samvatsara (Saka-nripa-kalatite dasa-sata.traya[s*]-trims-adhike Khara-samvatsare Kartika-paurnimasyam Budhavare) corresponding to 18th October 1111 A. D., and issued by Gunda महादेवी (गुंड महादेवी), the chief queen of Maharjaa Dharavarsha, the mother of Somesvaradeva and the grand mother of Kanharadeva, who was then ruling on the death of his father (Maharaja-Somesvara-devasya swar (swr)gate tesham putrasya, asam, naptuh . . . Srimad-vira-Kanharadevasya kalyana-vyaya-raiya). The dynasty claims to belong to the Nagavansha and the Kasyapa gotra, to have a tiger with a calf as their crest and to be the lords of Bhogavati the best of the cities (Nagavamsodbhava, Bhogavati-pura-var-esvara savatsa-vyaghra Lamchhana Kas(s)yapa,-gotra). At the end of the inscription the sun and moon, a cow and a calf, and a, dagger and shield with a linga in its socket, exactly of the shape in which the Lingayats wear them, are engraved. There is a postscript to this inscription in which it is stated that the land was given by Dharana-mahadevi, who was probably the widow of Somesvara, as will appear further on. There can be no doubt that Narayanpal is the Narayanapura of the inscription. A temple of Narayana is still standing there. The image of Vishnu, about 2' high, canopied by a hooded snake, is exquisitely executed.

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