Randhawa

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Randhawa (रंधावा)[1]/(रणधावा)[2][3] is a Gotra of Jats found in Punjab, Maharashtra, Jammu and Kashmir and Pakistan.

Origin

  • They used to attack (धावा) with great courage in the war (रण). [4]

History

Ram Swarup Joon[6] writes about Saran, Randhawa, Kajla: The Saran gotra is a branch of Bhatti gotra and the Saran Jats are associated with the royal dynasty of Jaisalmer. Their capital was in Bikaner State, which was later occupied by the Rathors. The Sarans live in this area even today.

In the history of this gotra there have been two famous men named Kajal Singh and his son Randhir Singh. Kajal Singh is the forefather of the Kajala gotra of the Jats who mostly live in Bikaner and Haryana.


History of the Jats, End of Page-99


Randhir Singh founded the village of Jhandiala in 1580 in the Punjab and his descendants are called Randhawa. His grandson Targha adopted the Sikh religion and while serving as Jathedar in Patiala misl ruled over Targha Pargana.


Randhawa, Saran, Kajla are gotras of Jats related with each other.


The Randhawa Chiefs Of Talwandi

Ram Sarup Joon[7] writes that ...In 1640 AD Chaudhary Randhir Chand founded the village Bhandahi on arrival from Rajastana and his grandson Targha founded Talwandi. In the fourth dynasty Pradhan Chand's son Santosh Singh adopted Sikhism. Working in the Jattha of Sardar Jai Singh he obtained Banga Talwandi as a Jagir.

Randhawa Chief of Khundha

Ram Sarup Joon[8] writes that ... The ancestor of this dynasty, Randhawa, was very famous in Rajasthan. His son. Kajal Singh, became the leader of a Jattha in Patiala and worked with enthusiasm and occupied the Parganas of Nowshera, Jafarwal, Khurha and Shahpur.

Distribution in Maharashtra

Villages in Nasik district

Tokada,

Distribution in Uttar Pradesh

Villages in Saharanpur district

Khalidpur (खालिदपुर)

Distribution in Punjab

Villages in Hoshiarpur district

Randhawa named village is in Dasua tahsil in Hoshiarpur district, Punjab

In Hoshiarpur district the Randhawa population is 1,125. [9]

Randhawa is village in Dasua tahsil in Hoshiarpur district in Punjab

Villages in Amritsar district

Randhawa have a population of 42,480 in Amritsar district. This clan owns 116 villages [10] and its main strength is in along the Batala border and around Mahta village in the area close to the Amritsar city.

Villages in Jalandhar district

According to B S Dhillon the population of Randhawa clan in Jalandhar district is 3,300.[11]

Villages in Firozpur district

In Firozpur district the Randhawa population is 930. [12]

Villages in Kapurthala district

Villages in Ludhiana district

Villages in Muktsar district

Villages in Patiala district

Randhawa have a population of 6,960 in Patiala district. This clan holds two villages in the sub-district of Sahibgarh and the village of Mimsa in the Sub-district Amargarh.[13]

Villages in Gurdaspur district

Hayat Nagar,

Distribution in Jammu and Kashmir

Villages in Jammu district

Rakh Flora, Sai, Gharana, Gharani, Baspur, Dhair, Nandpur, Nanga, Tupsari, Kaku De Khote, Samba

Distribution in Pakistan

Randhawa - The Randhawa claim Jadaun ancestry. The Randhawa are one of the larger Jat tribes, found in Sialkot, Narowal, Gujranwala, Sheikhupura, Lahore and Kasur districts. Prior to partition, Muslim Randhawa were also present in Amritsar, Firuzpur, Gurdaspur, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar and Patiala districts.

Notable persons from this gotra

See also

Gallery of Randhawas

References

  1. B S Dahiya:Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study), p.242, s.n.190
  2. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. र-48
  3. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.57,s.n. 2113
  4. Mahendra Singh Arya et al: Adhunik Jat Itihas, p. 278
  5. Ram Swarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter V, p. 99
  6. Ram Swarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter V, p. 99-100
  7. History of the Jats/Chapter XI,p. 191
  8. History of the Jats/Chapter XI,p. 191
  9. History and study of the Jats, B S Dhillon, p. 127
  10. Falcon, R.W. (Captain), Handbook on Sikhs for the Use of Regimental Officers, Printed at the Pioneer Press, Allahabad, India, 1896, pp. 81-103.
  11. History and study of the Jats, B S Dhillon, p. 127
  12. History and study of the Jats, B S Dhillon, p. 127
  13. History and study of the Jats, B S Dhillon, p. 126
  14. Ministry Of Home Affairs (Public Section), Padma Awards Directory (1954-2013), Year-Wise List
  15. Ministry Of Home Affairs (Public Section), Padma Awards Directory (1954-2013), Year-Wise List
  16. Ministry Of Home Affairs (Public Section), Padma Awards Directory (1954-2013), Year-Wise List
  17. Ministry Of Home Affairs (Public Section), Padma Awards Directory (1954-2013), Year-Wise List
  18. Ministry Of Home Affairs (Public Section), Padma Awards Directory (1954-2013), Year-Wise List

Further reading


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