Danta Ramgarh

From Jatland Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Author of this article is Laxman Burdak लक्ष्मण बुरड़क
Location of Danta Ramgarh in Sikar district

Danta Ramgarh (दांता रामगढ) is a tahsil in Sikar district in Rajasthan . Dantaramgarh is 51 km from SIKAR located on SIKAR Jaipur road via Jobner. Danta and Ramgarh towns are known by this twin name. Ramgarh was called Nalwa in ancient times. [1]

Villages in Danta Ramgarh tahsil

Abhaipura, Achron Ki Dhani, Aheer Ka Bas, Ajabpura, Akhepura, Aloda, Amanipura, Amarpura, Anantpura, Badhala Ki Dhani, Baidh Ki Dhani, Bajyawas, Baloopura, Balyawas, Banathala, Banoora, Bar Ka Charanwas, Barsinghpura, Basri Kalan, Bay, Beniyon Ka Bas, Bhagatpura, Bhagatpura, Bhagwan Pura, Bharija, Bheema, Bheerana, Bhoja Ki Dhani, Bhoordon Ka Bas, Buchyasi, Buwana, Chainpura, Chainpura, Chak, Chak Bharija No.1, Chak Bharija No.2, Chak Chihala, Chak Dhedi, Chak Geeliya, Chak Gogawas, Chak Kailash, Chak Khandelsar, Chak Kikraliya, Chak Kumliwala, Chak Ladhana, Chak Majipura, Chak Mitai, Chak Tilokpura, Chak Turkiya, Chandeli Ka Bas, Chandrasinghpura, Chhota Pana Ki Dhani, Chihala, Chirasara, Dalatpura, Danji Ka Bas, Dansroli, Danta, Dantla, Daulpura, Dhani Chetandas, Dhani Kanwar, Dheejpura, Dheengpur, Dholasari, Doodwa, Dookia, Dulhepura, Ganeshpura Losal, Ganora, Gila Ki Dhani, Godiawas, Gogawas, Gopinath Pura, Gordhanpura, Goriya, Goriyan, Gowati, Gumanpura, Guwardi, Hanumanpura, Haripura, Heerwas, Jaloond, Jana, Jeenmata, Jeenwas, Jhamawas, Jhun Ka Bas, Kailash, Kankra, Kantiya, Karad (करड़), Karanpura, Kariron Ki Dhani, Karni Pura, Kawariya Was, Kerpura, Kerpura, @ Charanwas Keshav Ka Bas, Khachariya Was, Khaitwas, Khandelsar, Khanri, Khariyawas, Khatiwas, Khatoo, Khichron Ki Dhani, Khood, Khora, Kikraliya, Kishanpura, Kochhor, Kuli, Lachhmanpura, Ladhana, Ladpura, Lamiyan, Laxmi Pura, Likhma Ka Bas, Losal (M), Madni, Maganpura, Magra, Magrasi, Majipura, Maksoodpura, Manda Surera, Mandha, Mandoli, Mei, Miyan Ki Dhani, Mohanpura, Motipura, Motlawas, Mudiyawas, Nada, Nada Charanwas, Nangal Danta Ramgarh, Nausal, Naya Bas, Nayabas, Neemawas, Neemera, Pachar, Palsana, Prempura, Prithvipura, Punyana, Rad Ki Dhani, Raghunathpura Sikar, Raipura, Raiwasa, Rajanpura, Rajpura, Rajpura, Ralawata, Ramgarh, Ramjipura, Rampura, Ranoli, Rar Ki Dhani, Reta, Roopgarh, Rooppura, Rulana, Sajjanpura, Samer, Sami, Sangalya, Sangarwa, Sanwalpura, Sawaipura, Sesam, Sheeshyoo, Sherpura, Shyami Ki Dhani, Shyampura, Shyampura, Sitarampura, Sri Rampura, Sujawas, Sukhpura, Sulyawas, Sundariya, Sundarpura, Surat Ram Ki Dhani, Surera, Tambakhoopura, Tehat, Trilokpura, Tuli Ka Charanbas, Tulsirampura, Udaipura, Umara, Vijaipura,

Jat Gotras

History

This village is famous for its strategic fort built by Guman Singh Ladkhani in the year 1744. The topography of the surroundings from the top of the fort is breaths taking. Baba Balinath was a very popular saint about 400 years back. He is regarded as a village diety in the area. [2]

Jat History

Jats are very dominant in the tahsil. Many Jat clans had their democratically established small kingdoms till 12th century. Some villages of historical importance to be mentioned are:

  • Kankra - This village is the site of ancient temples of about 800 years back which are known as 'Jadu Ke Mandir'. These were built by a Jat ruler. Nearby village Bhadwa is the site of Bhadwa Ugam Jat Pillar Inscription of samvat 1116 (1059 AD).
  • Karad - Associated with Kankra as above.
  • Khandelsar - Associated with history of Burdak. As per bards in the village Sarnau there was a war between Burdaks and Dhakas. In the rohi (Agricultural land) of Khandelsar village there is a site with some ancient ruins of habitation.
  • Ladhana - Associated with history of Bijarnia Jat clans. It was their capital.
  • Losal - It was founded by Thalod Jats and it was their capital.
  • Rewasa - It is an ancient village near Harsh and is associated with the early history of Chauhans.
  • Ranoli - We find mention of this place in Harsh Inscription of year 961 AD as Rana-pallika. The spiritual teacher Visva-rupa's disciple Allata was Vargatika brahman who belonged to Rana-pallika village in neighbourhood of Harsha. Rana-pallika is identified as present Ranoli village.
  • Sami - This village was founded by Ranwa Jats. Sahajarao was the ancestor of Ranwa gotra who left Nagaur in vikram samvat 1111 and founded village Saamikhera and constructed fort and Shiva temple there. There is an inscription of the year s.v.1485 (1428 AD) of a Ranwa warrior named Malashi in village Sami at Shiva temple.
  • Sangaliya - Sangaliya is associated with history of Kulhari gotra.

Relation of Danta Ramgarh with Dantewada and Bastar

According to Dalip Singh Ahlawat Nagavanshi Jats ruled in Chhattisgarh in Kawardha, Khairagarh and Chakra Kotiya. Out of these Chakra Kotiya or Chakra Kota kingdom has been identified with place which still exists by the name of Chitrakot in Bastar district in Chhattisgarh. We have following inscriptional evidences of Nagavanshi Jat rule in Bastar area of Chhattisgarh to support the claim of Dalip Singh Ahlawat.

1. Narayanpal Stone inscription of Queen Gunda-mahadevi 1111 AD was found at Narayanpal, which is a village 23 miles west of Jagdalpur in Bastar. It records the grant of the village Narayanapura to the god Narayana and some land near the Khajjuri tank to the god Lokesvara, and it is dated in the Saka year 1033 on Wednesday, the full moon-day of the Karttika month in the Khara samvatsara corresponding to 18th October 1111 A. D., and issued by Gunda महादेवी (गुंड महादेवी), the chief queen of Maharjaa Dharavarsha, the mother of Somesvaradeva and the grand mother of Kanharadeva, who was then ruling on the death of his father. The dynasty claims to belong to the Nagavansha and the Kasyapa gotra.

2. Bilaigarh Plates of Prithvideva II : Kalachuri year 896 (1144 AD) [3] is the inscription of Prithvideva II from Kalachuris of Ratanpur which mentions about a Naga Ruler named Jateshwara in Chakrakota.

Similarly in Danta Ramgarh tahsil of Sikar district in Rajasthan also we find at village Kankra ancient temples of about 800 years back which are known as 'Jadu Ke Mandir'. These were built by a Jat ruler. Nearby village Bhadwa is the site of Bhadwa Ugam Jat Pillar Inscription of samvat 1116 (1059 AD).

Another evidence is at village Sami. This village was founded by Ranwa Jats. Sahajarao was the ancestor of Ranwa gotra who left Nagaur in vikram samvat 1111 and founded village Saamikhera and constructed fort and Shiva temple there.

It is clear from inscriptional evidences at Danta Ramgarh and Bastar that in 1111 AD Nagavanshi Jat rulers are ruling from Danta Ramgarh to Dantewara and Bastar in Chhattisgarh.

The relation of Danta Ramgarh with Dantewada, a town and district in the state of Chhattisgarh, needs further researched. It seems both had Nagavanshi Jat rulers of common ancestry.

Apart from inscriptional evidences the rulers leave traces in form of villages after them. In Bastar and Dantewara districts of Chhattisgarh we find villages which have common names with those of Nagaur and Sikar districts in Rajasthan. We will also have similarity in clans and history. We mention names of some villages here from Bastar and Dantewara districts:

Villages in Dantewara and Bastar districts -

Relation of Danta Ramgarh with Dantapura

Dantapura was the capital of Kalinga in Gunjam district in Orissa during times of Buddha. It has been mentioned in the Buddhist history (see - Pauni) that the the prince Danta Kumar and princess Hemmālla took the tooth relics of Buddha from Dantapura, the capital of Kalinga in Gunjam district in Orissa, to the Naga country of Andhra Pradesh. [4]

The relics of Buddha, which were enshrined in a beautiful and magnificent stupa near the "Diamond Sands". Originally, this portion of relics was related to Ramagrama near Kapilvastu, but when the Ramagrama stupa was washed away by the river, the relic casket containing one of the original eight divisions of Buddha's remains was carried down the Ganges to the sea, where it was picked up by the Nagas and conveyed to their own country, called Majerik. Now this country was to the south of Dantapura, because prince Danta-Kumara and the princess Hemamalla, when flying from Dantapura to Ceylon with the tooth relics of Buddha, were wrecked on the coast near the 'Diamond Sands'. The name itself also helps to fix the position of the 'Diamond Sands', at or near Dharanikotta, on the Krishna, as the diamond mines of this part of the country are restricted to the small district of Partial, lying immediately to the north of Dharnikotta. The flight from Dantapura took place in A.D. 310, at which time according to the Siamese version, the two Drona measures of relics were still preserved in the Naga country" Further Cunningham writes .. "It must be noted however, that the people of Northern India were happily unaware that the Drona of relics enshrined at Ramagrama had been carried off by the Nagas to Majerika, as both Fa-Hian and Huen Tsang, who actually visited the place in the fifth and seventh centuries respectively, mention that the stupa was still standing. It is curious, however, to learn from the journals of both pilgrims, that even in their days the Ramagrama relics were believed to be watched over by the Nagas of a tank close by the stupa. According to the original Buddhist legend, these Nagas had-prevented Ashoka from removing the relics from Ramagrama. In the lapse of time, when Ramagrama had become deserted, as it was found by both pilgrims, this legend might easily have assumed the slightly altered form that the Nagas had carried off the relics to prevent their removal by Ashoka. This form of the legend would have been eagerly seized upon by the Nagas of Southern India and the transfer of the relics to their own country of Majerik, would, at once, have commanded the easy belief of a credulous people." [5]

Notable persons

External links

References

  1. Dr. Raghavendra Singh Manohar:Rajasthan Ke Prachin Nagar Aur Kasbe, 2010,p. 223
  2. Dr. Raghavendra Singh Manohar:Rajasthan Ke Prachin Nagar Aur Kasbe, 2010,p. 213
  3. Corpus Inscriptionium Indicarium Vol IV Part 2 Inscriptions of the Kalachuri-Chedi Era, Vasudev Vishnu Mirashi, 1905, p. 551-554
  4. Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas, the Ancient Rulers of India, 2002, p. 392
  5. Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas, the Ancient Rulers of India, 2002, p. 391

Back to Jat Villages