Ror

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Ror (रोर)[1] Rod (रोड़) Rur (रूर)[2] is gotra of Jats. It is variant of Rora (रोरा)[3] Roda (रोड़ा) clan. They were powerful about 7000 years back.[4] Rora (रोरा) is variant of Rathors. They had rule in Kagarol (कागारोल) near Agra in Uttar Pradesh. [5] Ror community belongs to Chauhans. Rorak/Rod clan is found in Afghanistan.[6]

History

The Ror (रोड़) clan is fairly small and well-knit; as of today, they hold nearly 270 villages in Haryana and 52 more in Western Uttar Pradesh and the Haridwar district of Uttaranchal.

In his famed work, "A Glossary of the Tribes and castes of Punjab and North-West Frontier Provinces", H.A. Rose says that the Ror are fine, stalwart men. Quoting from the third volume, Rose says:[7]

The real seat of the Ror is the great Dhak jungles of Thanesar. They hold 84 villages and Amin is the "Tika" or head village. They also hold 12 villages south of Kaithal and the gotra there is Turan. Again, there are 12 more villages of the Ror beyond the Ganges. The immediate place of origin of the Rors seems to be Badli in Jhajjar tehsil of Rohtak district and all of them unanimously claim to have come from there.

In the Archaeological Survey of India Report for the year 1871-72, A.C.L. Carlleyle says about the image of a Ror warrior found at the site of Kaga Ror or Kagarol:[8]

The features of the face are fine and manly, of the handsomest Hindu type. The warrior has his right knee raised; on his right arm he presents a shield in defense and in the left hand he brandishes a straight sword of huge dimensions over his head. In a belt round his waist he wears a dagger with a cross-shaped hilt at his left side. The hair of the head is full but drawn back in straight lines on the head. Evidently, its a figure of a warrior of great strength.

The fort at Bhainsror in Southern Rajasthan is supposed to have come up in the 2nd century B.C. and the Kagarol (Kaga Ror)[9] ruins near present-day Agra have also pointed to a similar time-line for another branch of Rors who ruled from there. The coins found in the Agra circle by Sir Alexander Cunningham [10] seem to indicate a close relationship between the Ror rulers of the area and the rulers of Hastinapur and Indraprastha. A few coins found close to the site have been dated to the 3rd century CE by Cunningham as a result of the general style of the coins and the type of Sanskrit used.[11]


ठाकुर देसराज लिखते हैं - आरम्भ में ये लोग पंजाब में आबाद थे और राठौर, राठी आदि की भांति अरट्टों के उत्तराधिकारी हैं। संयुक्त-प्रदेश में कागरौल नामक स्थान के पास इनका राज्य था, जो कि इनके काक नाम के राजा के नाम पर बसाया हुआ जान पड़ता है। कहा जाता है उसका किला एक मील के घेरे से भी अधिक था। जैगारे व कागरौल के बीच में उसके निशान अब तक बताये जाते हैं। रोर या रूर लोग अब से सात सौ वर्ष वैभवशाली थे। लाखा बंजारे की और सोरठ की गाथा का इन रोर लोगों से ही सम्बद्ध है, ऐसा भी अनुमान किया जाता है। [12]

Distribution in Rajasthan

Villages in Nagaur district

Rod (रोड़) Jats live in : Lamba Jatan,

Villages in Barmer district

Rodiyon Ka Tala,

Distribution in Punjab

Villages in Rupnagar district

Reference

  1. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. र-41
  2. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.58,s.n. 2163
  3. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. र-41
  4. Mahendra Singh Arya et al: Adhunik Jat Itihas, p. 278
  5. Mahendra Singh Arya et al: Adhunik Jat Itihas,p. 278
  6. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan, H. W. Bellew, p.122,179
  7. Pages 834-835, A Glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Provinces, By H A Rose, Sir Denzil Ibbetson, Sir Edward Douglas Maclagan, Published 1990, Asian Educational Services, ISBN 8120605055
  8. Pages 210-212, Archaeological Survey of India, Report for the year 1871-72, Volume IV, Agra circle covered by A.C.L. Carlleyle, Under the supervision of Alexander Cunningham
  9. The ancient fort buried under this place (village Khangar Ror or Kaga Ror) was founded by a Ror Raja, son of Raja Khangar", Pages 210-212, Archaeological Survey of India, Report for the year 1871-72, Volume IV, Agra circle covered by A.C.L. Carlleyle, Under the supervision of Alexander Cunningham
  10. Junagadh Rock Inscription of Rudradaman
  11. Page 96, Archaeological Survey of India, Report for the year 1871-72, Volume IV, Agra circle covered by A.C.L. Carlleyle, Under the supervision of Alexander Cunningham
  12. जाट इतिहास:ठाकुर देशराज,पृष्ठ-563

See also


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