Taxakeshwar

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Author of this article is Laxman Burdak लक्ष्मण बुरड़क
Taxakeshwar temple
Statue of Taxaka at Taxakeshwar temple
Statue of Dhanvantari at Taxakeshwar temple
Waterfall (Fountain of the Amjar) at Taxakeshwar temple

Taxakeshawar (तक्षकेश्वर) or Takhaji (ताखाजी) is a place of religious and historical importance with temple of Taxaka in Mandsaur district in Madhya Pradesh. It is situated at a distance of 22 km from Bhanpura town on Hinglajgarh road. [1]This is the site of serpent king taxak , where he is worshiped as Taxakeshawar but the local people call him Takhaji. Curiously enough he shares the worship of the country folk with Dhanvantri, the Indian Aesculapius. [2][3] The shrine in question stands on a most romantic spot from village Navali[4] situated on the table land at the foot of which Bhanpura lies. [5]

Temple of Taxak

This place is very important from natural and scenic beauty. James Tod had visited this place in 1821 and was amazed to see its scenic beauty. [6] There is a grand natural water pool full of many varieties of fish. The source of water in it is a hot water spring which falls from a height of about 200 feet. [7] The river Takhali at a distance of about 10 km from Chambal River that flows to Jhalawar in Rajasthan falls into this water pool and forms the water fall (Fountain of the Amjar).

This place is probably the only site having a temple and a statue of nagaraja Taxak. Statue of Taxaka is shown with seven serpent hoods protecting from above. In one hand of Taxaka is shown a human head. On one side is shown his wife and his son on other side. The period of installing this statue is estimated to be 12th century. [8] [9] A fair is held on every purnima of baisakh month of Hindu Calendar. [10]

In front of the statue of Taxaka is installed the statue of Dhanvantari. The main temple has also the statue of Shiva, considered as swami of Taxaka.

Mythological legend

Image of the Snake King (Takhaji) at the Fountain of the Amjar

There is puranic mythological legend heard about nagaraja Taxaka and Dhanavantari in this part of Malwa region in Madhya Pradesh. Emperor Janamejaya ascended to the throne of Hastinapura upon the death of his father Parikshita. According to legend, Parikshita, the lone descendant of the House of the Pandu, had died of snakebite. He had been cursed by a sage to die so, the curse having been consummated by the serpent-chieftain Takshak. Janamejaya bore a deep grudge against the serpents for this act, and thus decided to wipe them out altogether. He attempted this by performing a great Sarpa satra - a sacrifice at Nagda that would destroy all living serpents. All the \nagas had been destroyed in this nagayagya except Taxaka, who is believed to have obtained boon from Lord Vishnu. Local tradition goes that Taxaka resides here.

On the other hand Dhanavantari along with his followers and medicines was going to save Parikshita. The Taxaka naga with the help of illusive powers took the form of wood-stick of chandan tree. When Dhanavantari took this wood-stick on his shoulder, the Taxaka bite him on back and Dhanvantari died. The local people believe that Dhanvantari stays here since that time as god of herbs and medicines. The local vaidyas first worship Dhanavantari here and then collect medicinal herbs for treatment.

Shivalinga at Taxakeshwar Temple

Takha village

Takha Jat clan

Takha (ताखा) gotra Jats live in Mandsaur and Nimach districts in Madhya Pradesh. The Jat villages in Mandsaur district where they live are: Nataram (Sitamau) The Jat villages in Nimach district where they live are: Fatehnagar (9), Khadawda (1), (See-Takha)

Taxak Jat clan

Taxak (तक्षक) Takshak (तक्षक) Tokas (तोकस) is Jat Gotra descended from Nagavansh king named Taxaka. Takshak gotra of Jats live in India, Pakistan and Central Asia get their gotra after him. (See -Taxak)

References

  1. Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 35
  2. Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas – The Ancient Rulers of India, p. 27
  3. J.P.H. Vogel:Indian Serpent lore, p.206
  4. http://www.fallingrain.com/world/IN/0/Navali.html
  5. Dr Naval Viyogi: Nagas – The Ancient Rulers of India, p. 27
  6. L.D.Dhariwal (Ed): Indore State Gazetteer, p. 66
  7. Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 36
  8. Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 36
  9. Chandra Bhusahan Trivedi:Dashpur, p. 15
  10. Usha Agarwal:Mandsaur Zile Ke Puratatvik samarakon ki paryatan ki drishti se sansadhaniyata - Ek Adhyayan, Chirag Prakashan Udaipur, 2007, p. 36
  11. Thakur Deshraj Jat Itihas, Delhi, 1992, p.149

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