Anarta

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Anarta (आनर्त) was the son of Sharyati in Suryavansha. The capital of this kingdom was Kushasthali (the ancient name of Dwaraka). It was an ancient Indian region which corresponded to the present-day North Kathiawar region of Gujarat state[1]

Mention by Panini

Anarta (आनर्त ) is name of a Country mentioned by Panini in Ashtadhyayi under Dhumadi (धूमादि) (4.2.127) group.[2]

Jat Gotras from Anarta

Anlayam (आनलायम) Jat gotra gets its name from Anarta (आनर्त). [3]


Annu, Anla, Onla, Anlayam, Onra, Antawat etc are the gotras of the Ann dynasty found amongst the Jats. There is reference to King Anlakha in the Mahabharata (Sabha Parva).

According to the census of 1911 the number of the Jat belonging to this gotra was 87,000. They are found in Jullundur, Hoshiarpur and Bikaner State. [4]

Anarta in the Puranic literature

According to Bhagavata Purana (Skandha IX. Chap. 3) the ancestry of Anarta is as under:

ManuSharyatiSukanya (m. Chyavana) + Uttanavarhi + Anarta + Dhuri Sena

AnartaRevata (He built a town called Kusasthali in the midst of the sea and from that town ruled Anarta and other lands.) → KakudminRevati

According to the Puranic accounts, this region was ruled by the Sharyata dynasty rulers, who claimed their descent from Sharyati, a son of Vaivasvata Manu. The kingdom was named after Anarta, the son of Sharyati. The capital of this kingdom was Kushasthali (the ancient name of Dwaraka). The last ruler of this dyansty was Kakudmi. After him, it was occupied by the Punyajana Rakshasas.[5] Later, the Yadavas migrated to this region under the leadership of Krishna.[6]

Sage Chyavana was also connected with Sharyati and Anarta. He married Sukanya, daughter of Sharyati and sacrificed for him.[7] His descendants were associated with the Haihayas, which occupied the neighbouring region, apparently after the demise of the Sharyata kingdom.[8]

Anarta under Saka rule

The Junagarh rock inscription of the Saka ruler Rudradaman I mentions Anarta as a part of his kingdom. He placed Anarta under his Pahlava (Parthian) Amatya (minister) Suvishakha, who re-built a dam on the Sudarshana Lake there.[9]

References

  1. Mahajan, V.D. (1960, reprint 2007). Ancient India, New Delhi: S. Chand, ISBN 81-219-0887-6, p.423
  2. V. S. Agrawala: India as Known to Panini, 1953, p.509
  3. Dr Mahendra Singh Arya, Dharmpal Singh Dudee, Kishan Singh Faujdar & Vijendra Singh Narwar: Ādhunik Jat Itihasa (The modern history of Jats), Agra 1998
  4. Ram Swarup Joon:History of the Jats/Chapter V, 1938, 1967 (Eng Tr)
  5. Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.98
  6. Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.282
  7. Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.194
  8. Pargiter, F.E. (1922, reprint 1972). Ancient Indian Historical Tradition, New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, p.304
  9. Raychaudhuri, H.C. (1972). Political History of Ancient India, Calcutta: Univsrsity of Calcutta, pp.447, 449

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