Gajraj

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Gajraj (गजराज)[1][2] Gajrania (गजरनिया) Gajraniya (गजरनियाँ) Gajraniyan (गजरानियां)[3] is a gotra of Jats found in Rajasthan.

Origin

They are said to be originated from Raja Gaj[4] , who was a ruler of Afghanistan. Maharaja Gaj founded the Ghazni city of Afghanistan in Yudhishthira year 3008 (93 B.C.). [5] They were considered to be the protectors of elephants (गज). [6]

Genealogy of Raja Gaj

Hukum Singh Panwar[7] has given the ancestry of Bharatpur rulers starting from 1. Yadu. Shini is at S.No. 38, Krishna at S.No. 43 and Vajra at S.No. 46[8]. From Naba at S.No. 47 onward we follow James Tod[9] who has based on records of Brahman Sukhdharma of Mathura.

1. Yadu → → → → 34. Andhaka → 35. Bhajmana → 36. Viduratha → 37. Shura → 38. Shini → 39. Bhoja → 40. Hardika → 41. Devamidha → 42. Vasudeva → 43. Krishna → 44. Pradyumna → 45. Aniruddha → 46. Vajra

47. Naba → 48. Prithibahu → 49. Bahubal (w.Kamlavati Puar) → 50. Bahu → 51. Subahu → 52. Rijh → 53. Raja Gaj (founded Ghazni in Yudhishthira 3008= BC 93) → 54. Salivahana (S.72 = AD 16) → 55. Raja Baland

History

Bhattis are a Jat as well as a Rajput clan, and fortunately for history, they have left their annals in Jaisalmer (Rajasthan) where they ruled for centuries. These records of theirs, have been included by Col. James Tod in his well known Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, in three volumes. We are quoting from this work of James Tod. [10]

The Bhattis of Jaisalmer trace their origin to the same Zabulistan/Gazni area of Afghanistan, where the Jat clans were ruling. Their annals, written by Brahman Sukhdharma of Mathura give the usual Yadu line of Krishna of Dwarika up to Naba, and then the Brahman writer says, "Thus far from Bhagvata, and I continue the history of the Bhattis.... " Here is clear admission that the genealogy of the Yadus has been given from Bhagvata Purana and the Bhattis who sought to be connected with the Yadus, are connected with 'Naba'.

Vajra had two sons, Naba and Khira. When the Yadus were exterminated in the conflict at Dwarica, and Hari had gone to heaven, Vajra was on his way from Mathura to see his father, but had only marched twenty coss (forty miles), when he received intelligence of that event, which had swept away his kindred. He died upon the spot, when Naba was elected king and returned to Mathura, but Khira pursued his journey to Dwarica. [11]

Naba had issue Prithibahu. Khira had two sons, Jhareja and Yadubhan. Yadubhan went to Behera and became a great prince, had a numerous progeny, and the place of their abode was henceforth styled Jadu Ka Dang. [12]

Prithibahu, son of Naba became prince of Marusthali. He had a son Bahubal, who espoused Kamlavati Puar, daughter of Vijaya Singh, Prince of Malwa. His son Bahu was killed by a fall from his horse ; he left one son, Subahu, who was poisoned by his wife, a daughter of Mund Raja Chohan of Ajmer : he left a son, Rijh, who reigned twelve years. He was married to Subhag Sundri, daughter of Ber Sing, prince of Malwa. His son was Raja Gaj. [13]

Raja Gaj founded Ghazni. On Sunday, the 3d of Bysāk, the spring season (Vasant), the Rohini Nikhitra, and Samvat Dharmaraja (Yudhishthira) 3008 (=93 BC), Raja Gaj seated on the throne of Ghazni. Raja Gaj invaded Kashmir ; and married the daughter of its prince, by whom he had a son, called Salivahan. When this child had attained the age of twelve, tidings of another invasion came from Khorasan. Raja Gaj sent his family and kin, and on pretence of a pilgrimage to Jwalamukhi, with the prince Salivahan, to Punjab, where he fixed on a spot with abundance of water, and having collected his clansmen around him, he laid the foundation of a city which he named after himself, Salivahanpura (Salpura), on Sunday, the 8th of the month of Bhadoon of S. 72 (=16 AD). The surrounding Bhomias attended, and acknowledged his supremacy. Salivahan conquered the whole region of the Punjab.[14]

Salbahan had fifteen sons, who all became Rajas : viz., Balund, Rasaloo, Dhurmungud, Vacha, Roopa, Soondur, Lekh, Juskurn, Naima, Maut, Neepak, Gangeou, Jugeou ; all of whom, by the strength of their own arms, established themselves in independence. [15]

Raja Baland succeeded. He had seven sons : Bhatti, Bhupati, Kullar, Jinj, Sarmor, Bhynsrecha, Mangreo. [16]

Raja Bhatti succeeded his father Raja Baland. He conquered fourteen princes, and added their fortunes to his own. Among his effects, he reckoned twenty-four thousand mules laden with treasure ; sixty-thousand horse, and innumerable foot. As soon as he mounted the gadi, he assembled all his forces at Lahore preparatory to the teeka-dour destined against Beerbhan Bhagel, lord of Kanakpur. Beerbhan fell in the battle which ensued, at the head of forty thousand men. With Bhatti, the patronymic was changed, and the tribe thenceforth was distinguished by his name. [17]

Bhupati had a son, Chakito, from whom is descended the Chakito (Chagitai) tribe.[18]

Kullar, third son of Raja Baland, had eight sons, whose descendants are designated Kullar[19] Their names were, Seodas, Ramdas, Asso, Kistna, Samoh, Gango, Jesso, Bhago ; almost all of whom became Moosulmauns. They are a numerous race, inhabiting the mountainous countries west of the river, and notorious robbers.[20]

Jinj, the fourth son, had seven sons ; Champo, Gokul, Mehraj, Hansa, Bhadon, Rasso, Jaggo, all whose issue bore the name of Jinj and in like manner did the other sons become the patriarchs of tribes. Doubtless the junction of Jinj with that of Johya, another numerous tribe, formed the Jenjuheh of Babar ; the Johyas of the Bhatti annals, now known only by name, but whose history forms a volume. The sons of Jinj have left numerous traces — Jenjian on the Garah ; Jinjinialli in the desert, &c. [21] Jinja and Jinjwaria are Jat clans originated from Jinj.

Raja Bhatti had two sons, Mangal Rao and Masur Rao.

Mangal Rao succeeded, but his fortune was not equal to that of his fathers. Dhoondi, king of Ghazni, with a mighty force, invaded Lahore; nor did Mangul Rao oppose him, but with his eldest son fled into the wilds on the hanks of the river. The foe then invested Salivahanpur, where resided the family of the Raja.[22]

Masur Rao escaped and fled to the Lakhi Jungle. There being only a cultivating peasantry in this tract, he overcame them, and became master of the country. [23]

Masur Rao had two sons, Abhe Rao and Saran Rao. The elder, Abhe Rao, brought the whole Lakhi Jungle under his control, and his issue, which multiplied, became famous as the Abhoria Bhattis. [24]

Saran Rao quarreled with and separated from his brother, and his issue descended to the rank of cultivators, and are well known as the Saran Jats. [25]

Mangal Rao, the son of Bhatti, and who abandoned his kingdom, had six sons : Majam Rao, Kullarsi, Moondraj, Seoraj, Phool, Kewala.[26]

Thus the offspring of Kullar-rai became the Kularia Jats. [27]

Those of Moondraj and Seoraj, the Moonda and Seora Jats.[28]

The younger boys, Phool and Kewala, who were passed off as a barber (nai), and a potter (kumhar), fell into that class.[29]

Ghosundi (Chittaurgarh) Inscription of Sarvatata Second Century BC

घोसुन्डी का लेख द्वितीय शताब्दी ई.पू.

यह लेख कई शिला खण्डों में टूटा हुआ है. इनमें से एक बड़ा खण्ड उदयपुर संग्रहालय में सुरक्षित है. प्रारम्भ में ये लेख घोसुन्डी गांव से, नगरी के निकट, जो चित्तौड़ से सात मील दूर है, प्राप्त हुआ था. लेख की भाषा संस्कत और लिपि ब्राह्मी है. प्रस्तुत लेख में संकर्षण और वासुदेव के पूजाग्रह के चारों ओर पत्थर की चारदिवारी बनाने और गजवंश के सर्वतात द्वारा अश्वमेघ यज्ञ करने का उल्लेख है. ये सर्वतात पाराशरी का पुत्र था यह भी इसमें अंकित है.

श्री जोगेन्द्रनाथ घोष के विचार से इस लेख में वर्णित नाम कण्ववंशीय ब्राह्मण मालूम होता है, जिसमें गाजायन गोत्र का सूचक और सर्वतात व्यक्ति का. जोह्नसन के विचार से यक लेख किसी ग्रीक, शुंग या आन्ध्रवंशीय का होना चाहिय. आन्ध्रों में ’गाजायन’ ’सर्वतात’ आदि नाम उस वंश के शासकों में पाये जाते हैं. जिससे यहां के शासक का आन्ध्रवंशीय होना अनुमानित होता है.

इन शिलाखण्डों की पंक्तियां इस प्रकार हैं:

पंक्ति १ न गाजामनेन पाराशरीपुत्रेण स...ण सर्वतातेन अश्वमेघ
पंक्ति २ [जि]ना (याजिना) भगवभ्यां (भगवद्भ्यां) संकर्षण वासुदेवाभ्यां
सर्वेश्वरा [भ्यां]
पंक्ति ३ भ्यां पूजाशिलाप्राकारो नारायणवाटेका (कारित:)

सन्दर्भ: डॉ. गोपीनाथ शर्मा, राजस्थान के इतिहास के स्त्रोत, 1983 , प.43-44

Distribution in Rajasthan

They are found in Districts Jhunjhunu, Jaipur, Ganganagar,Sikar in Rajasthan.

Locations in Jaipur city

Ambabari, Murlipura Scheme, Queens Road,

Villages in Jhunjhunu district

Gajraj clan is found in villages: Chirawa, Palota,Pilani ,

Villages in Churu district

Gajuwas,

Villages in Sikar district

Gajraj clan is found in villages: Chala, Hamirpura,

Villages in Bharatpur district

Gajraj clan is found in villages: Sujalpur ,

Villages in Alwar district

Majri Bhanda

Notable persons

  • Late Pratap Singh Gajraj - Born on 1 January 1948 at village Palota in Jhunjhunu district, Rajasthan in the family of Ch. Sanwat Ram Gajraj. He served in Indian Army, recruited in Pratap Sena in early age. He did a remarkable contribution in 1965 Indo-Pak War. Initially he settled at village Malpura in Tonk district but soon came to Jaipur. De died on 18 March 2011.[30]
  • Girdhari Lal Gajraj - Jr. Accountant, P.S. Neem Ka Thana.

References

  1. Dr Pema Ram:‎Rajasthan Ke Jaton Ka Itihas, p.299
  2. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. ग-8.
  3. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. ग-9
  4. Jat Samaj, Agra : March 1998
  5. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.200
  6. Mahendra Singh Arya et al.: Adhunik Jat Itihas, Agra 1998, p. 240
  7. The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/Appendices/Appendix No.1
  8. Yadu Vamsavali of Bharatpur given by Ganga Singh in his book 'Yadu Vamsa', Part 1, Bharatpur Rajvansa Ka Itihas (1637-1768), Bharatpur, 1967, pp. 19-21
  9. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.196-201
  10. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, pp.199-204
  11. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.195
  12. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.196
  13. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.197
  14. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.200
  15. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.200
  16. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.201
  17. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  18. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  19. We can, by means of the valuable translation of the Commentaries of Baber, trace many of these tribes.
  20. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  21. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  22. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202-203
  23. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  24. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  25. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  26. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  27. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204
  28. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204
  29. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204
  30. Jat Express, 25 March 2011
  31. Jat Gatha, Jan-16,p.33

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