Raja Baland

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Author of this article is Laxman Burdak लक्ष्मण बुरड़क

Raja Baland was son of Raja Gaj who was a ruler of Afghanistan in first century AD. Maharaja Gaj founded the Ghazni city of Afghanistan. Gajrania gotra is found in jats who are descendants of Raja Gaj.[1]

Genealogy of Raja Baland

Hukum Singh Panwar[2] has given the ancestry of Bharatpur rulers starting from 1. Yadu. Shini is at S.No. 38, Krishna at S.No. 43 and Vajra at S.No. 46[3]. From Naba at S.No. 47 onward we follow James Tod[4] who has based on records of Brahman Sukhdharma of Mathura.

1. Yadu → → → → 34. Andhaka → 35. Bhajmana → 36. Viduratha → 37. Shura → 38. Shini → 39. Bhoja → 40. Hardika → 41. Devamidha → 42. Vasudeva → 43. Krishna → 44. Pradyumna → 45. Aniruddha → 46. Vajra

47. Naba → 48. Prithibahu → 49. Bahubal (w.Kamlavati Puar) → 50. Bahu → 51. Subahu → 52. Rijh → 53. Raja Gaj (founded Ghazni in Yudhishthira 3008= BC 93) → 54. Salivahana (S.72 = AD 16) → 55. Raja Baland

History

Bhattis are a Jat as well as a Rajput clan, and fortunately for history, they have left their annals in Jaisalmer (Rajasthan) where they ruled for centuries. These records of theirs, have been included by Col. James Tod in his well known Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, in three volumes. We are quoting from this work of James Tod. [5]

The Bhattis of Jaisalmer trace their origin to the same Zabulistan/Gazni area of Afghanistan, where the Jat clans were ruling. Their annals, written by Brahman Sukhdharma of Mathura give the usual Yadu line of Krishna of Dwarika up to Naba, and then the Brahman writer says, "Thus far from Bhagvata, and I continue the history of the Bhattis.... " Here is clear admission that the genealogy of the Yadus has been given from Bhagvata Purana and the Bhattis who sought to be connected with the Yadus, are connected with 'Naba'.

Vajra had two sons, Naba and Khira. When the Yadus were exterminated in the conflict at Dwarica, and Hari had gone to heaven, Vajra was on his way from Mathura to see his father, but had only marched twenty coss (forty miles), when he received intelligence of that event, which had swept away his kindred. He died upon the spot, when Naba was elected king and returned to Mathura, but Khira pursued his journey to Dwarica. [6]

Naba had issue Prithibahu. Khira had two sons, Jhareja and Yadubhan. Yadubhan went to Behera and became a great prince, had a numerous progeny, and the place of their abode was henceforth styled Jadu Ka Dang. [7]

Prithibahu, son of Naba became prince of Marusthali. He had a son Bahubal, who espoused Kamlavati Puar, daughter of Vijaya Singh, Prince of Malwa. His son Bahu was killed by a fall from his horse ; he left one son, Subahu, who was poisoned by his wife, a daughter of Mund Raja Chohan of Ajmer : he left a son, Rijh, who reigned twelve years. He was married to Subhag Sundri, daughter of Ber Sing, prince of Malwa. His son was Raja Gaj. [8]

Raja Gaj founded Ghazni. On Sunday, the 3d of Bysāk, the spring season (Vasant), the Rohini Nikhitra, and Samvat Dharmaraja (Yudhishthira) 3008 (=93 BC), Raja Gaj seated on the throne of Ghazni. Raja Gaj invaded Kashmir ; and married the daughter of its prince, by whom he had a son, called Salivahan. When this child had attained the age of twelve, tidings of another invasion came from Khorasan. Raja Gaj sent his family and kin, and on pretence of a pilgrimage to Jwalamukhi, with the prince Salivahan, to Punjab, where he fixed on a spot with abundance of water, and having collected his clansmen around him, he laid the foundation of a city which he named after himself, Salivahanpura (Salpura), on Sunday, the 8th of the month of Bhadoon of S. 72 (=16 AD). The surrounding Bhomias attended, and acknowledged his supremacy. Salivahan conquered the whole region of the Punjab.[9]

Salbahan had fifteen sons, who all became Rajas : viz., Balund, Rasaloo, Dhurmungud, Vacha, Roopa, Soondur, Lekh, Juskurn, Naima, Maut, Neepak, Gangeou, Jugeou ; all of whom, by the strength of their own arms, established themselves in independence. [10]

Raja Baland succeeded. He had seven sons : Bhatti, Bhupati, Kullar, Jinj, Sarmor, Bhynsrecha, Mangreo. [11]

Raja Bhatti succeeded his father Raja Baland. He conquered fourteen princes, and added their fortunes to his own. Among his effects, he reckoned twenty-four thousand mules laden with treasure ; sixty-thousand horse, and innumerable foot. As soon as he mounted the gadi, he assembled all his forces at Lahore preparatory to the teeka-dour destined against Beerbhan Bhagel, lord of Kanakpur. Beerbhan fell in the battle which ensued, at the head of forty thousand men. With Bhatti, the patronymic was changed, and the tribe thenceforth was distinguished by his name. [12]

Bhupati had a son, Chakito, from whom is descended the Chakito (Chagitai) tribe.[13]

Kullar, third son of Raja Baland, had eight sons, whose descendants are designated Kullar[14] Their names were, Seodas, Ramdas, Asso, Kistna, Samoh, Gango, Jesso, Bhago ; almost all of whom became Moosulmauns. They are a numerous race, inhabiting the mountainous countries west of the river, and notorious robbers.[15]

Jinj, the fourth son, had seven sons ; Champo, Gokul, Mehraj, Hansa, Bhadon, Rasso, Jaggo, all whose issue bore the name of Jinj and in like manner did the other sons become the patriarchs of tribes. Doubtless the junction of Jinj with that of Johya, another numerous tribe, formed the Jenjuheh of Babar ; the Johyas of the Bhatti annals, now known only by name, but whose history forms a volume. The sons of Jinj have left numerous traces — Jenjian on the Garah ; Jinjinialli in the desert, &c. [16] Jinja and Jinjwaria are Jat clans originated from Jinj.

Raja Bhatti had two sons, Mangal Rao and Masur Rao.

Mangal Rao succeeded, but his fortune was not equal to that of his fathers. Dhoondi, king of Ghazni, with a mighty force, invaded Lahore; nor did Mangul Rao oppose him, but with his eldest son fled into the wilds on the hanks of the river. The foe then invested Salivahanpur, where resided the family of the Raja.[17]

Masur Rao escaped and fled to the Lakhi Jungle. There being only a cultivating peasantry in this tract, he overcame them, and became master of the country. [18]

Masur Rao had two sons, Abhe Rao and Saran Rao. The elder, Abhe Rao, brought the whole Lakhi Jungle under his control, and his issue, which multiplied, became famous as the Abhoria Bhattis. [19]

Saran Rao quarreled with and separated from his brother, and his issue descended to the rank of cultivators, and are well known as the Saran Jats. [20]

Mangal Rao, the son of Bhatti, and who abandoned his kingdom, had six sons : Majam Rao, Kullarsi, Moondraj, Seoraj, Phool, Kewala.[21]

Thus the offspring of Kullar-rai became the Kularia Jats. [22]

Those of Moondraj and Seoraj, the Moonda and Seora Jats.[23]

The younger boys, Phool and Kewala, who were passed off as a barber (nai), and a potter (kumhar), fell into that class.[24]

Raja Gaj founds Ghazni

James Tod[25] writes that The Raja sent scouts to obtain accurate intelligence, and marched to Harreou to meet him ; while the foe encamped two coss from Kunjshahr. A battle ensued, in which the invader was defeated with the loss of thirty thousand men, and four thousand on the part of the Hindus. But the foeman rallied, and Raja Rijh, who again encountered him, was wounded and died just as prince Guj returned with Hansavati, his bride, daughter of Yadubhan of the east. In two battles the king of Khorasan was vanquished, when he obtained an auxiliary in the king of Room (Romi-pati), to establish the Koran and the law of the prophet in infidel lands. While the armies of the Asuras were thus preparing their strength.

Raja Guj called a council of ministers. There being no strong-hold of importance, and it being impossible to stand against numbers, it was determined to erect a fortress amidst the mountains of the north. Having summoned his friends to his aid, he sought council of the guardian goddess of his race ; who foretold that the power of the Hindus was to cease, but commanded him to erect a fort and call it Gujni. While it was approaching completion, news came that the kings of Room and Khorasan were near at hand :

Roomi-pat, Khorasan-pat hae, gai pakhur, pāi,
Chinta terā, cht'h legi ; soono Jud-pat Rai2

The stick wounded the drum of the Jadoo prince ; the army was formed, gifts were distributed, and the astrologers were commanded to assign such a moment for marching as might secure the victoiy.


[p.199]: Thursday (Vrishpativar) the 13th of Mah, the enlightened half of the moon, when one ghurri of the day had fled, was the auspicious hour ; and the drum of departure sounded. That day he marched eight coss, and encamped at Dulapur. The combined kings advanced, but in the night the Shah of Khorasan died of indigestion. When it was reported to the king of Room (Shah Secunder Roomi) that Shah Mamraiz was dead, he became alarmed and said, ' while we mortals have grand schemes in hand, he above has other views for us' Still his army advanced like waves of the ocean ; caparisons and chains clank on the backs of elephants, while instruments of war resound through the host. Elephants move like walking mountains ; the sky is black with clouds of dust ; bright helms reflect the rays of the sun. Four coss (eight miles) separated the hostile armies. Raja Guj and his chieftains performed their ablutions, and keeping the Joginis in their rear, advanced to the combat each host rushed on like famished tigers ; the earth trembled ; the heavens were overcast ; nor was aught visible in the gloom but the radiant helm. War-bells resound ; horses neigh ; masses of men advance on each other, like the dark rolling clouds of Bhadoon. Hissing speeds the feathered dart ; the lion roar of the warriors is re-echoed ; the edge of the sword deluges the ground with blood ; on both sides the blows resound on the crackling bones. Here was Yadu-Rae, there the Khans and Ameers, as if Time had encountered his fellow. Mighty warriors strew the earth; heroes fall in the cause of their lords. The army of the Shah fled ; he left twenty-five thousand souls entangled in the net of destruction ; he abandoned elephants and horses, and even his throne. Seven thousand Hindus lay dead on the field. The drum of victory resounded, and the Yadus returned triumphant to his capital.

On Sunday, the 3d of Bysāk, the spring season (Vasant), the Rohini Nikhitra, and Samvat Dharma-raja (Yudhishthira) 3008,2 seated on the throne of Ghazni, he maintained the Yadu race With this victory his power became firm : he conquered all the countries to the west, and sent an ambassador to Kashmir to call its prince Kandrupkel to his presence. But the prince refused the summons : he said the world would scoff at him if he attended the stirrup of another without being first worsted in fight. Raja Guj invaded Kashmir ; and married the daughter of its prince, by whom he had a son, called Salivahan.

When this child had attained the age of twelve, tidings of another invasion came from Khorasan. Raja Guj shut himself up for three entire days in the temple of Kuladevi : on the fourth day the goddess


[p.200]: appeared and revealed to him his destiny ; that Gujni would pass from his hands, but that his posterity would re-inherit it, not as Hindus but as Mooslems; and directed him to send his son Salivahan amongst the Hindus of the east, there to erect a city to be named after him. She said that he would have fifteen sons, whose issue would multiply ; 'that he (Raja Guj) would fall in the defence of Ghazni, but would gain a glorious reward hereafter.'

Prince Salivahana arrives in the Punjab

James Tod[26] writes that Having heard his fate revealed, Raja Guj convened his family and kin, and on pretence of a pilgrimage to Jwalamukhi, he caused them to depart, with the prince Salbahan, for the east.

Soon after the foe approached within five coss of Gujni. Leaving therein his uncle Seydeo for its defence. Raja Guj marched to meet him. The king of Khorasan divided his army into five divisions ; the Raja formed his into three : a desperate conflict ensued, in which both the king and the Raja were slain. The battle lasted five pahars, and a hundred thousand Meers and thirty-thousand Hindus strewed the field. The king's son invested Gujni ; for thirty days it was defended by Seydeo, when he performed, the Saka; and nine thousand valiant men gave up their lives.

When tidings of this fatal event were conveyed to Salivahan, for twelve days the ground became his bed. He at length reached the Punjab, where he fixed on a spot with abundance of water, and having collected his clansmen around him, he laid the foundation of a city which he named after himself, Salivahanpura. The surrounding Bhomias attended, and acknowledged his supremacy. Seventy-two years of the era of Vikrama had elapsed when Salivahanpura was founded, upon Sunday, the 8th of the month of Bhadoon.

Salivahan conquered the whole region of the Punjab.

Salivahan had fifteen sons, who all became Rajas : viz., Balund, Rasaloo, Dhurmungud, Vacha, Roopa, Soondur, Lekh, Juskurn, Naima, Maut, Neepak, Gangeou, Jugeou ; all of whom, by the strength of their own arms, established themselves in independence.


[p.201]: The coco-nut from Raja Jeipal Tuar was sent from Dehli, and accepted. Balund proceeded to Dehli, whose prince advanced to meet him. On his return with his bride, Salbahan determined to redeem Gujni from the foe and avenge his father's death. He crossed the Attoc to encounter Jellal, who advanced at the head of twenty thousand men. Crowned with victory, he regained possession of Gujni, where he left Balund, and returned to his capital in the Punjab: he soon after died, having ruled thirty-three years and nine months.

Balund Succeeded. His brothers had now established themselves in all the mountainous tracts of the Punjab. But the Toorks began rapidly to increase, and to subjugate all beneath their sway, and the lands around Ghazni were again in their power. Balund had no minister, but superintended in person all the details of his government.

Jat descendants of Raja Baland

James Tod[27] writes that Balund had seven sons : Bhatti, Bhupati, Kullur, Jinj,3 Surmor, Bhynsrecha, Mangreo.

The second son Bhupati (i. e., lord of the earth) had a son, Chakito, from whom is descended the Chakito (Chagitai) tribe.4

Chakito had eight sons, viz., Deosi, Bharoo, Khemkhan, Nahur, Jeipal5, Dharsi, Beejli-Khan, Shah Summund.

Balund, who resided at Salivahanapura, left Gujni to the charge of his grandson Chakito ; and as the power of the barbarian (Mlechchha) increased, he not only entertained troops of that race, but all his nobles were of the same body. They offered, if he would quit the religion of his fathers, to make him master of Balich Bokhara, where dwelt the Oosbek race, whose king had no offspring but one daughter. Chakito married her, and became king of Balich Bokhara, and lord of twenty-eight thousand horse. Between Balich and Bokhara runs a mighty river, and Chakito was king of all from the gate of Balichshan to the face of Hindusthan ; and from him is descended the tribe of Chakito Moguls.6


1. At every page of these annals, it is evident that they have been transcribed by some ignoramus, who has jumbled together events of ancient and modern date. The prince of Dehli might have been Jeipal, but if we are to place any faith in the chronology of the Tuar race, no prince of this family could be synchrouons with the Yadu Salivahan. I am inclined to think that the emigration of Salbahan's ancestors from Gujni was at a much later period than S. 72, as I shall note as we proceed.

2. Toork is the term in the dialects which the Hindus apply to the races from Central Asia, the Turshka of the Poorans.

3. Doubtless the ancestor of the Johya race, termed the Jenjuheh by Baber, and who dwelt with the Juds in the hills of Jud, the Juddoo-ca-dang of the Bhatti MSS.

4. However curious this assertion, of this : I repeat, that all these tribes, whether termed Indo-Scythic or Tatar, prior to Islamism, professed a faith which may be termed Hinduism.

5. As it is evident the period has reference to the very first years of Islamism, and it is stated that the sons of Guj were to be proselytes, it is by no means improbable that this is Jypal, the infidel prince of Khwarezm.— See Prices Mahomedan History.

6. This is a most important admission of the proselytism of the ancient Indo Scythic- Yadu princes to the faith of Islam, though there can be no reasonable doubt of it. Temugin, better known by his nomme de guerre Jungees, the father of Chagitai, according to the Mahomedan historians, is termed an infidel, and so was Tacash, the father of Mahomed of Khwarezm : the one was of the Getic or Yuti race ; the other, as his name discloses, of the Tak or Takshac, the two grand races of central Asia. The insertion of this pedigree in this place completely vitiates chronology : yet for what purpose it could have been interpolated, if not founded on some fact, we cannot surmise.


[p.202]: Kullur, third son of Balund, had eight sons, whose descendants are designated Kullur1 Their names were, Seodas, Ramdas, Asso, Kistna, Samoh, Gango, Jesso, Bhago ; almost all of whom became Moosulmauns. They are a numerous race, inhabiting the mountainous countries west of the river,2 and notorious robbers.

Jinj, the fourth son, had seven sons ; Champo, Gokul, Mehraj, Hunsa, Bhadon, Rasso, Juggo, all whose issue bore the name of Jinj3 and in like manner did the other sons become the patriarchs of tribes.

Bhatti succeeded his father Balund. He conquered fourteen princes, and added their fortunes to his own. Among his effects, he reckoned twenty-four thousand mules4 laden with treasure ; sixty- thousand horse, and innumerable foot. As soon as he mounted the gadi, he assembled all his forces at Lahore preparatory to the teeka-dour5 destined against Beerbhan Bhagel, lord of Kenekpoor. Beerbhan fell in the battle which ensued, at the head of forty thousand men.

Bhatti had two sons, Mungul Bao and Musoor Rao. With Bhatti, the patronymic was changed, and the tribe thenceforth was distinguished by his name.

Mungul Rao succeeded, but his fortune was not equal to that of his fathers. Dhoondi, king of Guzni, with a mighty force, invaded


1. We can, by means of the valuable translation of the Commentaries of Baber, trace many of these tribes.

2. It has already been stated, that the fifteen brothers of Balund established themselves in the mountainous parts of the Punjab, and that his sons inherited those West of the Indus, or Damaun. The Afghan tribes, whose supposed genealogy from the Jews has excited so much curiosity, and who now inhabit the regions conquered by the sons of Salbahan, are possibly Yadus, who on conversion, to give more edāt to their antiquity, converted Yadu into Yahudi, or Jew, and added the rest of the story from the Koran. That grand division of Afghans called the Eusofzye, or ' Sons of Joseph,' whose original country was Cabul and Guzni, yet retain the name of Jadoon (vulgar of Yadu), as one of their principal subdivisions ; and they still occupy a position in the hilly region east of the Indus, conquered by the sons of Balund. It would be a curious fact could we prove the Afghans not Yahudis but Yadus.

3. Doubtless the junction of Jinj with that of Johya, another numerous tribe, formed the Jenjuheh of Baber ; the Johyas of the Bhatti annals, now known only by name, but whose history forms a volume. The sons of Jinj have left numerous traces — Jenjian on the Garah ; Jinjinialli in the desert, &c.

4. Even the mention of an animal unknown in the desert of India, evinces the ancient source whence these annals are compiled. Had the Yadu colony at this period obtained a footing in the desert, south of the Sutlej, the computation would have been by camel loads, not by mules.

5. Sec Vol, I. p. 313, for an account of this military foray.


[p.203]: Lahore;1 nor did Mungul Rao oppose him, but with his eldest son fled into the wilds on the hanks of the river. The foe then invested Salbahanpoor, where resided the family of the Raja ; but Musoor Rao escaped and fled to the Lakhi Jungle.2 There being only a cultivating peasantry in this tract, he overcame them, and became master of the country.

Musoor Rao had two sons, Abhe Rao and and Sarun Rao. The elder, Abhe Rao, brought the whole Lakhi Jungle under his control, and his issue, which multiplied, became famous as the Abhoria Bhattis.

Saran quarreled with and separated from his brother, and his issue descended to the rank of cultivators, and are well known as the Saran Jats.3

"Mungul Rao, the son of Bhatti, and who abandoned his kingdom, had six sons : Mujum Rao, Kullursi, Moolraj, Seoraj, Phool, Kewala.

"When Mungul Rao fled from the king, his children were secreted in the houses of his subjects. A Bhomia named Satidas, of the tribe of Tak,4 whose ancestors had been reduced from power and wealth by the ancestors of the Bhatti prince, determined to avenge himself, and informed the king that some of the children were concealed in the house of a banker (sahoocar). The king sent the Tak with a party of troops, and surrounded the house of Sridhar, who was earned


1. This would almost imply that Lahore and Salbahana were one and the same place but from what follows, the intervening distance could not have been great between the two cities. There is a Sangala, south of Lahore, near the altars of Alexander, and a Sialkote in our modern maps. Salbahana, Salbahanpoor, or simply Salpoora, may have been erected on the ruins of Kampilanagri. We may hope that researches in that yet untouched region, the Punjab, will afford much to the elucidation of ancient history.

2. The Lakhi Jungle is well known in India for its once celebrated breed of horses, extinct within the last twenty years.

3. Thus it is that the most extensive agricultural races spread all over India, called Jats or Jits, have a tradition that they are descended from the Yadu race, (qu. Yuti?) and that their original country is Candahar. Such was stated to be the origin of the Jats of Biana and Bhurtpore. Why the descendants of Saran assumed the name of Juts is not stated.

4. This incidental mention of the race of Tak, and of its being in great consideration on the settlement of the Yadus in the Punjab, is very important. I have given a sketch of this tribe (Vol. I, p. 93), but since I wrote it, I have discovered the capital of the Tak, and on the very spot where I should have expected the site of Taxila, the capital of Taxiles, the friend of Alexander. In that sketch I hesitated not to say, that the name was not personal, but arose from his being the head of the Takshac or Naga tribe, which is confirmed. It is to Baber, or rather to his translator, that I am indebted for this discovery. In describing the limits of Banu, Baber thus mentions it : "And on the west is Desht, which is also called Bazar and Tak ;" to which the erudite translator adds, "Tak is said long to have been the capital of Damān." In Mr. Elphinstone's map, Bazar, which Baber makes identical with Tak, is a few miles north of the city of Attoc. There is no question that both the river and city were named after the race of Tak or Takshac, the Nagas, Nagvansi, or 'snake race', who spread over India. Indeed, I would assume that the name of Omphis, which young Taxiles had on his father's death, is Ophis, the Greek version of Tak, the 'serpent' The Taks appear to have been established in the same region at the earliest period. The Mahabharata describes the wars between Janamejaya and the Takshacs, to revenge on their king the death of his father Parikshita, emperor of Indraprastha, or Dehli.


[p.204]: before the king, who swore he would put all his family to death if he did not produce the young princes of Salbahana. The alarmed banker protested he had no children of the Raja's, for that the infants who enjoyed his protection were the offspring of a Bhomia, who had fled, on the invasion, deeply in his debt But the king ordered him to produce them ; he demanded the name of their village, sent for the Bhomias belonging to it, and not only made the royal infants of Salbahana eat with them, but marry their daughters. The banker had no alternative to save their lives but to consent: they were brought forth in the peasant's garb, ate with the husbandmen (Juts), and were married to their daughters.

Thus the offspring of Kullur-rai became the Kullorea Jats ;

those of Moondraj and Seoraj, the Moonda and Seora Jats;

while the younger boys, Phool and Kewala, who were passed off as a barber (nie), and a potter (khomar'), fell into that class.

" Mungul Rao, who found shelter in the wilds of the Garah, crossed that stream and subjugated a new territory. At this period, the tribe of Baraha1 inhabited the banks of the river; beyond them were the Boota Rajpoots of Bootaban.2 In Poogul dwelt the Pramara3: in Dhat the Soda4 race ; and the Lodra5 Rajpoots in Lodorva. Here Mungul Rao found security, and with the sanction of the Soda prince, he fixed his future abode in the centre of the lands of the Lodras, the Barahas, and the Sodas. On the death of Mungul Rao, he was succeeded by

" Mujum Rao, who escaped from Salbahanpoor with his father. He was recognized by all the neighbouring princes, who sent the usual presents on his accession, and the Soda prince of Amarkot made an offer of his daughter in marriage, which was accepted, and the nuptials were solemnized at Amerkote. He had three sons, Kehur, Moolraj,6 and Gogli


1. The names of these Rajpoot races, several of which are now blotted from the page of existence, prove the fidelity of the original manuscript. The Barahas are now Mahomedans.

2. The Boota is amongst the extinct tribes.

3. Poogul from the most remote times has been inhabited by the Pramar race. It is one of the No-Koti Maroo-ca, the nine castles of the desert.

4. The Sodas of Amarkot have inhabited the desert from time immemorial, and are in all probability the Sogdi of Alexander. See Vol. I, p. 85.

5. Lodorva will be described hereafter.

6. Moolraj had three sons, Raj pal, Lohwa, and Choobar. The elder son had two sons, Ranno and Geegoh ; the first of whom had five sons, Dhookur. Pohor, Bood, Koolroo, Jeipal, all of whom had issue, and became heads of clans. The descendants of Geegoh bore the name of Khengar (qu. chiefs of Girnar ?) The annals of all these states abound with similar minute genealogical details, which to the Rajpoots are of the highest importance in enabling them to trace the affinities of families, but which it is imperative to omit, as they possess no interest for the European reader. I have extracted the names of the issue of Moolraj to shew this. The Khengars were famed in the peninsula of Saurashtra — nine of them ruled in Junagarh Girnar ; and but for this incidental relation, their origin must have ever remained concealed from the archaeologist, as the race has long been extinct.


[p.205]:

" Kehur became renowned for his exploits. Hearing of a caravan (kafila) of five hundred horses going from Arore1 to Multan, he pursued them with a chosen band disguised as camel-merchants, and came up with his prey across the Punjnud,2 where he attacked and captured it, and returned to his abode. By such exploits he became known, and the coco-nut (naryal) was sent to Mujum Rao, and his two elder sons, by Allansi Deora, of Jhalore. The nuptials were celebrated with great splendour, and on their return, Kehur laid the foundation of a castle, which he named Tunnote in honour of Tunno-devi. Ere it was completed, Rao Mujum died.

" Kehur succeeded. On his accession, Tunnote was attacked by Jesrit, chief of the Barahas,3 because it was erected on the bounds of his tribe ; but Moolraj defended it, and the Barahas were compelled to retire.

" On Mungulwar (Tuesday), the full moon of Mah, S. 7874 (A.D.731), the fortress of Tunnote was completed, and a temple erected to Tunno-Mata. Shortly after a treaty of peace was formed with the Barahas, which was concluded by the nuptials of their chief with the daughter of Moolraj."

Having thus fairly fixed the Yadu-Bhatti chieftain in the land of Maruca, it seems a proper point at which to close this initiatory chapter with some observations on the diversified history of this tribe, crowded into so small a compass ; though the notes of explanation, subjoined as we proceeded, will render fewer remarks requisite,


1. The remains of this once famous town, the ancient capital of the upper valley of the Indus, I had the happiness to discover by means of one of my parties, in 1811. It is the Alore of Abulfazil, the capital of Raja Sehris, whose kingdom extended north to Kashmir, and south to the ocean ; and the Azour of D'Anyille, who on the authority of Ibn Haukal, says, " Azour est presque comprable d Multan pour la grandeur" He adds, that Azizi places it " trente parosangesade Mansora" If Mansora is the ancient Bekher (capital of the Sogdi), we should read three instead of thirty. See Map.

2. Punjnud is the name which the Indus bears immediately below the point confluenoe of the five streams (panch-nadi). The mere mention of such terms as the Punjnud, and the ancient Arore, stamps these annals with authenticity, however they may be deformed by the interpolations and anachronisms of ignorant copyists. Of Arore, or the Punjnud, excepting the regnlar casids, or messengers, perhaps not an individual living in Jessulmer could now speak.

3. This shews that the Baraha tribe was of the same faith with the Yadu Bhatti ; in fact "the star of Islam" did not shine in these regions for some time after, although Omar, in the first century, had established a colony of the faitfaful at Bekher, afterwards Mansoora. The Barahas are mentioned by Pottinger in his travels in Balochistan.

4. There are but six descents given from Salbahan, the leader of the Yadu colony from Zabuhstan into the punjab, and Kehur, the founder of their frst settlement in the desert of India. The period of the first is S.72, of the other S.787. Either names are wanting, or the period of Salbahan is erroneous. Kehur's period, viz., S.787, appears a landmark, and is borne out by numerous subsequent most valuable synchronisms. Were we to admit one hundred years to haw elapsed between Salbahan and Kehur, it would make the period of expulsion from Zabulistan about S.687, which is just about the era of


External links

References

  1. Jat Samaj, Agra : March 1998
  2. The Jats:Their Origin, Antiquity and Migrations/Appendices/Appendix No.1
  3. Yadu Vamsavali of Bharatpur given by Ganga Singh in his book 'Yadu Vamsa', Part 1, Bharatpur Rajvansa Ka Itihas (1637-1768), Bharatpur, 1967, pp. 19-21
  4. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.196-201
  5. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, pp.199-204
  6. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.195
  7. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.196
  8. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.197
  9. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.200
  10. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.200
  11. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.201
  12. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  13. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  14. We can, by means of the valuable translation of the Commentaries of Baber, trace many of these tribes.
  15. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  16. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202
  17. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.202-203
  18. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  19. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  20. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  21. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.203
  22. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204
  23. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204
  24. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.204
  25. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.198-200
  26. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.200-201
  27. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II, Annals of Jaisalmer, p.201-202

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