Dhillon

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Dhillon (ढिल्लों)[1] Dhillan (ढिल्लन)[2] Dhillvan (ढिल्लवां) Dhallu (ढल्लू)[3] Dhillu (ढिल्लू)[4] [5] Dhilan (ढिलान)[6] Dhil (ढिल)[7] [8] Dhalan (ढलान) Dehlan (डहलान) Dhall (ढल्ल) Dhillwan (ढिल्लवां)[9] is Gotra of Jats in India and Pakistan. [10] Dhillons are mainly found among Jat Sikh Gotras but Jat Hindus also exist in Hissar, Jind, Sirsa & Kurukshetra districts. Dhillon Jats, who are Muslim, also exist in West Punjab (now Pakistan). Delhi, the capital of India was founded by Dhillon gotra Jats.

Origin

Ferozepur tradition avers that Saroia, Jat, had five sons, Sangha, Mallhi, Dhindsa, Dhillon and Dusanj, eponyms of as many gots. [11]

History

Sometimes known as the "Raja Jats" (King Jats), this mainly due to the large number of Kings, royalty and warriors that have come from this tribe throughout history. It is considered to be one of the oldest Jat tribes with history dating back over 4000 years [12].


The Dhillons are called the descendants of Karna [13], the famed royal warrior mentioned in the great Hindu epic, the Mahabharata and he was also the eldest son of Queen Kunti. There was a King Karna in the Bhin-baroliya gotra too. Most Dhillons today trace their history back to Prince Dhillon[14], the first Dhillon, the grandson of Karna and great grandson of Queen Kunti.

According to the family tree of Dhillons of Amritsar, Prince Dhillon was the grandson of Mahabharat famed Karna and son of Loh Sen [15]. Karna the famed warrior mentioned in the great Hindu epic, the Mahabharata. Karna was killed at Kurukshetra. After Karna was killed at the Battle of Kurukshetra, his descendants first went to Rajasthan and then to Bhatinda in present-day Punjab. Even now, Dhillons are settled in large numbers in the areas of Bhatinda. They are also settled in the area of Moga, Sangrur, Ropar, Patiala and abroad.

In addition, Dhillons are linked to the royal house of the Pandavas. Yudhishtra, ruler of Hastinapur and Indraprastha, later known as Delhi. The third ruling Jat dynasty in this line was Dhillon whose descendants are the present Jat gotras. Dhillon, Dhilwal and Dhill. Swami Dayanand Saraswati, the founder of the Arya Samaj, has in his book "Satyarth Prakash" ("The Light of Truth"), quoted from the famous book "Chadrika Pushtika" that from Yudhishtra to Harsha Vardhan, 124 rulers ruled for 4257 years 9 months and 14 Days [16]. Six dynasties ruled during this period. The first three dynasties had their capitals in Hastinapur, Indraprastha and Kausambi. During the reign of the fourth generation, the capital was changed to Magadha. It is also mentioned that during the reign of the fourth generation of Yudhisthra, Hastinapur was destroyed due to changes in the course of the River Ganga.

The Dhillon Dynasty founded Delhi[17] and ruled there from 800 BC to 283 BC (about 450 years). It is from the name of Dhillon that we have the word Dhilli or Delhi. A ruler of the Dhillon dynasty, Raja Dhilu (King Dihlu) founded Delhi and the dynasty ruled from there from 800 BC to 283 BC. According to Radhe Lal, who quotes 'Waqiate-panch Hazarsala, 800 years before Christ, 13 rulers of Dhillon gotra - ruled for about 450 years. Some of their names are:

  • Raja VirMaha (817 BC - 800 BC)
  • Mahabal or Swarupbal (800 BC - 744 BC)
  • Sarvdutt or Swarupdatt (744 BC - 708 BC)
  • Virsen (708 BC - 668 BC)
  • Singdaman or Mahipal (668BC - 624 BC)
  • Kalink or Sanghraj (624 BC - 595 BC)
  • Jitmal or Tejpal (595 BC - 515 BC)
  • Kaldahan or Kamsen (515 BC - 506 BC)
  • Shtrumardan (506 BC - 481 BC)
  • Raja Jiwan (481 BC - 455 BC)
  • Virbhujang or Hari Rao (455 BC - 424 BC)
  • Virsen II (424 BC - 389 BC)
  • Udaybhat or Adityaketu (389 BC - 372 BC)

This book[18] describes the Dhillon Jat rule from 800 BC to 350 BC. Dhillon is a big Jat gotra and is not found in any other community. A major part of this gotra adopted the Sikh faith.

Dhillon Jats ruled Delhi again in the 8th century. They are from among the Saroa Rajputs. In 8th century, Tomara/Toors had seized the throne and power of Delhi from Dhillons and their kinsman Sanghas, Malhis, Dosanjhs and Dhindsas who were descendants of Shah Saroa. Leaving Delhi, they moved towards Rajasthan. After some time they migrated to the Bangar areas of Sirsa in Haryana and Bhatinda. Some of them went beyond to Ludhiana and Ferozepur. Most of the Dhillons from Ferozepur went into Majha. Dhillons from Ludhiana went further into Doaba. Some of the Dhillons went as far as Gujjranwala.

The Dhillon Sikh Dynasty and their clan founded the Bhangi Army (Misl), who ruled and governed in the 18th century over most of the major cities of Punjab, including Amritsar, Lahore, Multan, Chiniot, Jhang, Bhera, Rawalpindi, Hasan Abdal, Sialkot, Gujarat and large areas of central and western Panjab[19].


B S Dahiya[20] writes: Dhillon is an important clan of ancient history. The fact that they are also found in the European population (Dillon) shows that they must have been older than the Christian era.

According to historian Qanungo, the city of Delhi is named after them and it was later on taken by the Chauhans. According to Farishta after the death of Kidar, Jaichand took the throne of Kannauj, to be succeeded by his brother, Dhill or Dahla, who founded the city of Delhi.[21] This happened in the fourth century B.C., i.e., before Porus's and Alexander's times. Its old name was Dhillika as is recorded in the inscription of Somesvara Chauhan, in V.S., 1226 (1169 A.D.).[22] Later on the suffix 'ka' was deleted and the city was named Dhilli. The inscriptions of V.S. 1337 found at Boher (Rohtak) reveal that the country of Haryāṇaka (Haryana) was first ruled by the Tomars and then by the Chauhans and then by the Ghori Sultans.[23] Gurdial Singh Dhillon, ex-Speaker of the Indian Lok Sabha is a scion of this clan. S. Prakash Singh Badal, Chief Minister of Punjab is also a Dhillon-the affix Badal, being the name of his ancestral village.


The Dhillon appear to have several Jatheras, Gaggowahna being mentioned in addition to those described on p. 238 supra. No particulars of these are forthcoming. But the fact that Dhillon was Raja Karn's grandson is commemorated in the following tale : — Karn used to give away 30 sers of gold every day after his bath but before his food. After his death the deity rewarded him with gold, but allowed him no food, so he begged to be allowed to return to the world where he set aside 15 days in each year for the feeding of Brahmans. He was then allowed to return to the celestial regions and given food.[24]

Religion

Dhillon Jats are mostly Sikhs or Muslims. Dhillon Sikhs founded the Bhangi Army Misl. In Punjab (India) and Haryana, Dhillons are mostly Sikh. In Punjab (Pakistan), they are mostly Muslim. Majority of the Dhillons in Sirsa, Hisar, Ambala and Karnal areas of Haryana are Sikhs. Majority of the Dhillons in Sialkot, Lahore and Gujranwala have converted to Islam.

Among Rajputs

Dhillon is also a gotra among Saroa Rajputs [25] who were descendants of Shah Saroa of Delhi, the ruler of Delhi in the 8th century. They chose to join and merge with the Dhillon Jats over 1000 years ago [26].

Secondary Dhillon Jat names

Due to the age and size of the ancient royal Dhillon clan, it has some small number of derivative secondary family names that keep Dhillon as their main surname but have minor family name before main Dhillon surname. The Sikh Dhillon Jats of the village of Kairon take on the name of the village and keep the main royal Dhillon name as their fourth name. The most famous Dhillon 'Kairon' is probably Pratap Singh Kairon Dhillon.

Distribution in Haryana

Dhillon's with origin in the following villages in Haryana State.

Villages in Hissar district

Shavite ,Nehla ,

Villages in Rewari district

Banipur,

Villages in Mahendragarh district

Jhigawan,

Villages in Jind district

Shamdo(jind) Dhola (jind) Pabra, Kanoh, Balak, Faridpur and Kanwari (one family)Naguran,

Villages in Panchkula district

Bagwala ,

Villages in Karnal district

In Karnal there are several villages of Dhillon's

Villages in Sirsa district

Rampura Dhilon,

Distribution in Punjab

Population of Dhillons in Patiala was 31,500. This clan claim its descent from "king Karn" and the Dhillons are mainly to be found in the sub-district of Govindgarh as well as in scattered villages of sub-districts Bhikhi and Fatehgarh. [27]

There are many villages named Dhillon or Dhilwan( district (Kapurthala) in Punjab. For example, Harnam Singh Wala is a village with almost 95 percent have their last name as Dhillon. This village is 13km from Rampura Phul in Bhatinda District. The village is known for growing some of the best wheat and peas in Punjab. These peas are especially delicious in late winter.

Majara Dingarian is a village situated in District Hoshiarpur, Punjab. Another word for Dhillon Jats in the Punjabi language is "Dingaria". Almost all of the village land is owned by Jats, particularly Dhillon clan.[28]

In Punjab (British India), the majority of Dhillons inhabited Amritsar and Gujranwala. In joint Punjab, majority of Dhillons were in Amritsar and Gujjranwala. In the 1881 Census, Dhillons numbered at 86563 (one of the largest amongst the Jat tribes) [29]. Dhillons are a very influential section of Jats. Majority of the Dhillons in Sirsa, Hisar, Ambala and Karnal areas of Haryana are Sikhs. Majority of the Dhillons in Sialkot, Lahore and Gujranwala have converted to Islam. Most of the Jats in Sialkot, Lahore and Gujranwala are believed to be Dhillons.

Today, Dhillons are settled in large numbers in Bhatinda, Moga, Sangrur, Rupnagar and Patiala in Punjab (India) as well as the Sirsa, Hisar, Ambala and Karnal areas of Haryana. Dhillons from Ludhiana and Doaba have migrated to foreign countries e.g. Canada, US, UK and etc.

In amritsar district the Dhillon population is 44,202: This clan as per Captain Falcon [30] holds 140 villages in the district. Some of the Dhillons' villages are Kasel, Dhand, Chabal, Kairon, Padri, Gaggobua, Panjwar, Lijan, and Gandiwind. [31]

In Ludhiana district Dhillon population is 9,858: This clan is scattered all over the district and claims coming from the west of the Sutlej river.[32]

According to B S Dhillon the population of Dhillon clan in Jalandhar district is 9,000.[33] In Firozpur district the Dhillon population is 22,500. [34]

Distribution in Rajasthan

Villages in Jaipur district

In Jaipur they are located in Bagruwalon ka Rasta, Jawahar Nagar, Purani Basti. Dhalan Jats live in villages in Jaipur district:

Gopalpura Jhadala (1), Sanwali,

Villages in Alwar district

Harsoli , Raniyawas ,

Villages in Sikar district

Dhani Guman Singh, Ghasseepura,

Distribution in Madhya pradesh

Villages in Shivpuri district

Shivpuri,

Villages in Gwalior district

Dabra Gwalior, Gwalior,

Distribution in Uttar pradesh

Villages in Hapur district

Nawada Kalan, Rasulpur,

Villages in Meerut district

Bhainsa

Villages in Agra district

Dhillon Khap has 4 villages in Agra district. [35]

Villages in Amroha district

Khandsal Kalan ,Ramhut (रामहुत)

Villages in Ghaziabad district

Nawada Kalan,

Historically Prominent Dhillon Jats

Distribution in Pakistan

Dhillon is Another famous central Punjab tribe, found in Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Shaikhupura, Sargodha and Gujrat districts. Prior to partition, found through East Punjab as well.

Prominent Dhillon Jats

References

  1. B S Dahiya:Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study), p.238, s.n.63
  2. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.42,s.n. 1082
  3. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.42,s.n. 1067
  4. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. 11
  5. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.42,s.n. 1067
  6. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.42,s.n. 1066
  7. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. 16
  8. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu,p.42,s.n. 1084
  9. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. ढ-17
  10. Mahendra Singh Arya et al: Adhunik Jat Itihas, p. 251, 252
  11. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/D, p.251
  12. Satyarth Prakash - Swami Dayananda Saraswati.
  13. Satyarth Prakash - Swami Dayananda Saraswati.
  14. History of the Jatt Clans - H.S Duleh.
  15. Satyarth Prakash - Swami Dayananda Saraswati.
  16. Satyarth Prakash - Swami Dayananda Saraswati (quoted from the famous book "Chadrika Pushtika").
  17. Satyarth Prakash - Swami Dayananda Saraswati.
  18. Satyarth Prakash - Swami Dayananda Saraswati.
  19. History of the Jatt Clans - H.S Duleh (Translation from original Punjabi work "Jattan da Itihas" by Gurjant Singh).
  20. Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/Jat Clan in India,p. 253-254
  21. Brigg's edition, quoted by Tribes and Castes, Vol. I, p.23.
  22. EI, Vol. XX, S. No. 344 of Inscriptions of Northern India.
  23. S. No. 598, op. cit., JASB, 01. XUl, pt. VI; p. 108.
  24. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/J,p.373
  25. History of the Jatt Clans - H.S Duleh (Translation from original Punjabi work "Jattan da Itihas" by Gurjant Singh).
  26. Satyarth Prakash - Swami Dayananda Saraswati.
  27. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. p. 126
  28. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. p.106
  29. History of the Jatt Clans - H.S Duleh.
  30. Falcon, R.W. (Captain), Handbook on Sikhs for the Use of Regimental Officers, Printed at the Pioneer Press, Allahabad, India, 1896, pp. 81-103.
  31. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. p.124
  32. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. p.123
  33. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon.p.127
  34. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. Ip.127
  35. Jat Bandhu, Agra, April 1991
  36. [1]

Further reading

History of the Jatt Clans - H.S Duleh (Translation from original Punjabi work "Jattan da Itihas" by Gurjant Singh).

See also



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