Kang

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Kang (कंग)/(कांग)[1] Kangri (कंगरी)[2]Kangori (कंगोरी)[3] King (किंग)[4] Kankas (कंकस)/Kang(काँग)[5] Kank (कंक/कन्क)/Kang (कंग)[6] is Suryavanshi gotra (clan) of Jats found in Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan in India and in Pakistan. Dilip Singh Ahlawat has mentioned it as one of the ruling Jat clans in Central Asia. [7] They were inhabitants of Kanyaka forest country, who dwell now in Punjab.[8] Kang clan is found in Afghanistan.[9]

Contents

Origin

It is surmised that they have originated from The Mahabharata Tribes Kanka (कङ्क). [10]

History

The Mahabharata Tribes mention Kanka (कङ्क) in the tribute list Mahabharata (II.47.26) as wearing horns, a practice among some Iranian tribes of Central Asia. A Jat tribe living between Beas and Sutlej in Punjab is as Kang; claims descent from solar race of Ayodhya. [11] B S Dahiya[12] writes: Kang, In Sanskrit works, are mentioned as Kankas. Their Central Asian origin has already been discussed. Vishnu Purana and Brahmanda Purana mention the Kang as ruling over South Maharashtra and Bhoj areas. According to Fleet, they were ruling near Hyderabad and the Musa river in the south (Deccan).[13] They are mentioned in the Aban Yasht, where the brave Hunas (Huns? Sunu? Son ?) of Vaesaka invoke the goddess Ardvisura (Ardoksho of the Kusanas?) at the gate of the lofty fort of Khsathrosaoka of the high and holy Kanga.[14] Firdausi places the fort of Kang (Kangdez) at about a month's distance from China.[15] Modi also mentions a Khyaona Arejataspa, (perhaps reminding of Ari-Zatoi of the Manda empire).[16] The Chinese name of Sogdiana-Kang- is so named as the Kang-nu were the rulers there.

Mahabharata says that when Yudhishthira performed his rajasuya yajna, these people (Kanka) along with the Sakas and the Tukharas brought to Indraprashtha, their horses as gifts to the Pandava king. [17]Their origin is Central Asia. R. Sankritayana says that the founders of the canal system in Central Asia were the ancestors of Kangs. [18]Visnu Purana and Brahmāṇḍa Purana mention the Kang as ruling over south Maharashtra and Bhoj areas. According to Fleet, they were ruling near Hyderabad and Musa river in south (Deccan).[19] They are mentioned in the Aban Yasht, where the brave Hunas (Huns?, Sunu?, Son?) of Vaesaka invoke the goddess Ardvisura (Ardoksho of Kusanas ?) at the gate of the lofty fort of Kshathrosaoka of the high and holy Kanga. [20] Firdausi places the fort of Kang (Kangdez) at about a month's distance from China. [21] Modi also mentions a Khyaona Arejataspa, (perhaps reminding of Ari-Zatoi of the Manda Empire).[22] The Chinese name of Sogdian -Kang-is so named as the Kang-nu were the rulers there. [23]

According to "Mahabharata Sabha Parva" page' 31 to 33 the 'King' ruler attended the coronation of Yudhishtra. They were Buddhists and paid no respect to the Brahmin priests. According to the "Vishnu) Purana" and the "Brahma Purana" the clan of King would one day under go all kinds of sufferings. This gotra is found among the Jats, the Rajputs and the Sikhs. They revolted against the Guptas in or about 350 AD. [24]

H.A. Rose[25] writes that Kang (कंग). — A tribe of Jats, found chiefly in the angle between the Beas and Sutlej, though they have crossed the latter river into Ambala and Ferozepur, and are apparently found in small numbers all along its banks and even on the Lower Indus. Their tradition is that they came from Garh Ghazni, but in Amritsar they say they were first settled in


[Page-473]: Khirpur, near Delhi. They occupied a position of some considerable political importance in their own tract, during the early days of Sikh rule. Mr. Barkley wrote of the Jullundur Kang :— " Most of the Sikh Sardars of the Nakodar tahsil either belong to this tribe, or were connected with it by marriage when they established their authority there. Tara Singh Gheba (sic), who was their loader at the time of the conquest, was himself of this race and a native of Kang on the Sutlej, where it is said that eighteen Sardars at one time resided ; but on the village being swept away by the river they dispersed themselves in their separate jagirs on both sides of the river." The Kang are said to claim descent from the Solar Race of Ajudhia through their ancestor Jogra, father of Kang, and in Amritsar give the following pedigree : —

Ram Chandar. → Lahu. → Ghaj. → HarbamTalochar. → Mal. → Jogra. → Kang.

(According to the Sialkot tradition Jogra had four sons, Rai, Natt, Kang and Abala origin who founded as many septs.)


Baba Malha, son of Mangu, 6th in descent from Kang, fell in fight with the Kheras on the spot which still marks a village boundary, and he is now worshipped, Mirasis taking the offerings made to him. Kangs and Kheras still refuse to intermarry.

Kang (कंग) Hindu Jat clan is found in Montgomery, and Amritsar. [26]

Distribution in Punjab and Himachal Pradesh

Most of the people of this tribe(Kang) live in north India, mostly in Punjab and Himachal Pradesh. It is believed by many local people of Pubjab and people of Jat (Kang) tribe that their Ancestors (Jathere) were based at village Dholi-Moli near Balachor, Just close to the Chandigarh-Jalandhar highway in Punjab about 70 kms from Chandigarh. They also have a place of worship at this village which is only for Kang people. Twice every year they have a ceremony (one at very next day of diwali and one in year when all other people go to their ancestor place) at this village where they even have public lunch and bull races to praise their ancestors.

They are said to be in parts of Haryana, Western Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan and variously known as Kang, Kank, Kankas and Kangri. In the census of 1881, in Rohtak district they were 786 in numbers.( source--The 1881 Census.-By Sir Denzil Ibbetson).In the folklore,it is said that their oldest village was Keharpur or Keharpura near Delhi from where the clan went over to various places.[27]

Keharpura (केहरपुरा) - We have information of two villages of this name and both are in Chirawa tahsil in Jhunjhunu district of Rajasthan. These are:

Keharpur (केहरपुर) - It is interesting to find two villages of name Keharpur (केहरपुर) and both in Chhattisgarh:

Map of Kanker district

We have traces of Kang history in Chhattisgarh.

Kanker (कांकेर) is a town and district in Chhattisgarh. It gets name after Mahabharata tribe named Kanka (कंक). In the list of The Mahabharata Tribes we find mention of Kanka (कङ्क), in the tribute list Mahabharata (II.47.26), as wearing horns, a practice among some Iranian tribes of Central Asia. Sandhya Jain has identified it with A Jat tribe living between Beas and Sutlej in Punjab as Kang; who claim descent from solar race of Ayodhya. [28]

शकास तुखाराः कङ्काश च रॊमशाः शृङ्गिणॊ नराः
महागमान थूरगमान गणितान अर्बुथं हयान (II.47.26)



Distribution in Up

Villages in Hapur district

Atuta

Distribution in Haryana

Village in Sirsa district

Bhavdin,

Distribution in Punjab

Villages in Gurdaspur district

Kang named Village is in Gurdaspur tahsil in Gurdaspur district in Punjab.

Villages in Patiala district

Kang Jats have population 2,850 in Patiala.[29] Kang Jats are 6,159 in number in Amritsar district. This clan holds a cluster of villages in the Tarn-Taran area including Kang, Mal Chak and Kalla. [30] Kang Jats are 897 in number in Ludhiana district.[31]

Villages in Jalandhar district

According to B S Dhillon the population of Kang clan in Jalandhar district is 5,400.[32]

Villages in Hoshiarpur district


In Hoshiarpur district the Kang population is 1,590. [33]

Villages in Firozpur district

In Firozpur district the Kang population is 2,400. [34]

Villages in Nawanshahr district


Villages in Fatehgarh Sahib district

Now a small town - Khamanon in Fatehgarh Sahib district in Punjab has a substantial population of Jats with the Kang Gotra. Master Manjit Singh Kang, was a well known school Principal who was also Numberdar and member of the Block Committee.

Distribution in Rajasthan

Jats of this clan live in Chittorgarh district in Rajasthan.

Kang village

Kang village is in the Jullundur District of Punjab and its main occupants are the Kang Jats. Almost all of the village land is owned by them.[35]

Distribution in Pakistan

Kang - The Kang are one of the larger Jat clans. They claim descent from Jogah, who was also an ancestor of the Sohal and Natt Jats. They are found in Lahore, Shaikhupura, Sialkot, Gujrat, Sargodha, Narowal, Faisalabad and Sahiwal districts. Prior to partition, many Muslim Kang were also found in Amritsar, Firozpur, Jalandhar and Ludhiana districts.

According to 1911 census the Kang were principal Muslim Jat clan in districts:

Notable persons from this clan

  • Kurran Kang Sarabha (Kang) - Revolutionary Freedom Fighter
  • G.A.S. Kang - IAS, Ex. Chief Secretary Bihar.

External Links

References

  1. B S Dahiya:Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study), p.239, s.n.111
  2. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n.क-7
  3. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. 169
  4. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. क-75
  5. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. क-121
  6. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. क-145
  7. Dilip Singh Ahlawat: Jat viron ka Itihas
  8. Mahendra Singh Arya et al.: Ādhunik Jat Itihas, Agra 1998, p.228
  9. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan, H. W. Bellew, p.135,185
  10. Sandhya Jain:Adideo Arya Devata, A Panoramic view of Tribal-Hindu Cultural Interface, Published in 2004 by Rupa & Co, 7/16, Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi, p.131
  11. Sandhya Jain:Adideo Arya Devata, A Panoramic view of Tribal-Hindu Cultural Interface, Published in 2004 by Rupa & Co, 7/16, Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi, p.131
  12. Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/Jat Clan in India,p. 259
  13. JRAS, 1905, p.293.
  14. J.J. Modi, ABORI, commemorative Volume, 1977, p.70,
  15. ibid., p. 69.
  16. ibid., p. 75.
  17. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats the Ancient Rulers ( A clan study), p. 34 (Sanskrit-शकास्तुखारा कंकाश्च रोमशः श्रंगिणों नराः)
  18. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats the Ancient Rulers ( A clan study), p. 76
  19. Journal of Royal Asitic Society, 1905, p. 293
  20. J J Modi, Annals of Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute, Poona, Commemorative Volume, 1977, p. 70
  21. ibid, p. 69
  22. ibid., p.75
  23. Bhim Singh Dahiya, Jats the Ancient Rulers ( A clan study), p. 259
  24. Ram Swarup Joon, History of the Jats
  25. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/K,p.472-473
  26. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/K,p.473
  27. Email by Manjit Singh Kang: kangmanjitsingh@yahoo.com
  28. Sandhya Jain:Adideo Arya Devata, A Panoramic view of Tribal-Hindu Cultural Interface, Published in 2004 by Rupa & Co, 7/16, Ansari Road, Daryaganj, New Delhi, p.131
  29. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. p.126
  30. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon.p.124
  31. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. p.123
  32. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon.127
  33. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. 127
  34. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon.127
  35. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. 106

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