Chandel

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Chandel (चंदेल)[1] [2] Chandla (चंदला), Chandele (चंदेले)/ Chandail (चन्दैल)[3] is gotra of Jats found in Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan. Chandoli/Chandeli clan is found in Afghanistan.[4]

Origin

This gotra started after place named Chandausi (चंदौसी). There was Chandel vanshi Raja Parmal.[5] They are Chandravanshi Jats.

History

Ram Swarup Joon[6] writes that The Chandela gotra belongs to Puru dynasty, as is proved from the inscription of Gaharwala. Chandela Rajputs are found in large numbers, but other Rajputs call them Jats. Bahadur Singh Bedasar of Bikaner has also proved that they are Jats.


Ram Sarup Joon[7] writes that...about 70 Jat Gotras joined the Gujar force and started calling themselves Gujars. Chandel is one of them.


Ram Sarup Joon[8] writes that...Chandela is a Jat gotra as has been proved by Thakur Bahadur Singh Pattedar of Badesar in his book "Gyan Sagar Gutka.


H.A. Rose[9] writes that Chandel (चंदेल). One of the 36 royal races, and fully described in Elliott's Races of the N.-W. Provinces. It is not impossible that they are the same stock as the Chandal, outcasts where subjects, Rajputs where dominant. They are returned chiefly from the Simla Hill State of Bilaspur. Rajput tradition in Karnal avers that the Chandel once held Kaithal and Samana, but were driven towards the Siwaliks by the Mandhars. It would be interesting to know how this lowest of all the Rajput races finds a place among the Simla States, and whether the ruling family of Bilaspur is Chandel. Chandel = Chandla (चंदला)

According to James Todd[10] The Chandela, classed by some of the genealogists amongst the thirty-six tribes, were powerful in the twelfth century, possessing the whole of the regions between the Jumna and Nerbudda, now occupied by the Bundelas and Baghelas.


[p.140]: Their wars with Prithwiraja, forming one of the most interesting of his exploits, ended in the humiliation of the Chandela, and prepared the way for their conquest by the Gaharwars ; the date of the supremacy of the Bundela Manvira was about A.D. 1200. Madhukar Sah, the thirteenth in descent from him, founded Orchha on the Betwa, by whose son, Birsingh Deva, considerable power was attained. Orchha became the chief of the numerous Bundela principalities ; but its founder drew upon himself everlasting infamy, by putting to death the wise Abu-l Fazl,1 the historian and friend of the magnanimous Akbar, and the encomiast and advocate of the Hindu race.

From the period of Akbar the Bundelas bore a distinguished part in all the grand conflicts, to the very close of the monarchy : nor, amongst all the brave chiefs of Rajasthan, did any perform more gallant or faithful services than the Bundela chieftains of Orchha and Datia. Bhagwan of Orchha commanded the advanced guard of the army of Shah Jahan. His son, Subhkarana, was Aurangzeb's most distinguished leader in the Deccan, and Dalpat fell in the war of succession on the plains of Jajau.2 His descendants have not degenerated ; nor is there anything finer in the annals of the chivalry of the West, than the dignified and heroic conduct of the father of the present chief.3 The Bundela is now a numerous race, while the name Gaharwar remains in their original haunts.


1 Slain at the instigation of Prince Salim, son of Akbar, afterwards the emperor Jahangir. See this incident stated in the emperor's own Commentaries [Ain, i. Introd. xxiv. ff.].
2 [For Subhkaran Singh, see Manucci (i. 270, 272). Dalpat was one of his patients (Ibid. ii. 298).]
3 On the death of Mahadaji Sindhia, the females of his family, in apprehension of his successor (Daulat Rao), sought refuge and protection with the Raja of Datia. An array was sent to demand their surrender, and hostility was proclaimed as the consequence of refusal. This brave man would not even await the attack, but at the head of a devoted band of three hundred horse, with their lances, carried destruction amongst their assailants, neither giving nor receiving quarter : and thus he fell in defence of the laws of sanctuary and honour. Even when grievously wounded, he would accept no aid, and refused to leave the field, but disdaining all compromise awaited his fate. The author has passed upon the spot where this gallant deed was performed ; and from his son, the present Raja, had the annals of his house.

James Tod[11] writes that The warriors assembled under Visaladeva Chauhan against the Islam invader included the Chandels, who contended with Pirthi Raj, who deprived them of Mahoba and Kalinjar, and all modern Bundelkhand.

Distribution in Madhya Pradesh

Villages in Bhopal district

Chandel Jats are found in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh.

Villages in Nimach district

Found in Bagpipalya in Nimach district.

Distribution in Rajasthan

Villages in Sri Ganganagar district

Roiadawali,

Villages in Sikar district

Purana Bas (1),

Gallery of Chandel people

Notable persons

  • Ram Narayan Chandel - Purana Bas Death- 04 July 2012.
  • Lekhu Ram Chandel - S/O Ram Narayan Chandel.
  • Bansi Lal Chandel - S/O Ram Narayan Chandel.
  • Lilu Ram Chandel - S/O Ram Narayan Chandel.

References

  1. Ram Sarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter VI,p.116
  2. Dr Pema Ram:‎Rajasthan Ke Jaton Ka Itihas, 2010, p.300
  3. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I,s.n. चच-16.
  4. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan, H. W. Bellew, p.122
  5. Mahendra Singh Arya et al.: Adhunik Jat Itihas, Agra 1998, p. 242
  6. Ram Swarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter V,p.76-77
  7. Ram Sarup Joon: History of the Jats/Chapter VI,p.116
  8. History of the Jats/ChapterVIII,p. 136
  9. A glossary of the Tribes and Castes of the Punjab and North-West Frontier Province By H.A. Rose Vol II/C, p.152
  10. James Todd, Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume I,: Chapter 7 Catalogue of the Thirty Six Royal Races,pp.139-40
  11. James Tod: Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan, Volume II,Annals of Haravati,p.414-416

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