Punia

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Punia (पूनिया) Puniya(पूनिया)[1] Poonia (पूनिया)[2] Pooniya(पूनिया) Ponia (पोनिया) Poniya (पोनिया) Paunia(पौनिया) Painiya (पैनियाँ) Poonya (पून्या) Poni (पोनि) Paunya (पौनया) Paunia (पौनिया)[3]Paun (पौन)[4] [5] is a clan or gotra of Jats in Rajasthan,[6] Haryana, Delhi, Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh in India. They are same as Paionia/ Panni/ Paionoi/Panya/Puni of Greek writers found in Afghanistan. clan is found in Afghanistan.[7]Dilip Singh Ahlawat has mentioned it as one of the ruling Jat clans in Central Asia. [8]

Contents

Origin

They are the descendants of Raja Paunbhadra (पौनभद्र) son of Virabhadra in the lineage of Puru.[9]

Thakur Deshraj considers them Nagavanshi. [10]

As per Hisar Gazetteer they are considered to be of Shiva or Shivi gotra. Dilip Singh Ahlawat has mentioned it as one of the ruling Jat clans in Central Asia. [11]

They are known as Pune in Maharashtra.[12] In Gujarat they write Paun or Pooliya. There is need to research if any relation exists of Puniya clan with the city of Pune and Pauni, the ancient Buddhist city, in Bhandara district in Maharashtra.

In Mahabharata

Shalya Parva, Mahabharata/Book IX Chapter 44 mentions names of Kshatriyas who came to the ceremony for investing Kartikeya with the status of generalissimo. Shloka 55 mentions Punyanamas along with Koks, Nadals, Mallis. [13]

History

Jat historians opine that before coming to Rajasthan, they were in Central Asia and than they migrated to northern Indian Punjab region and at the time of Alexander invasion in Punjab in 326 B.C. they fought with Alexander The Great and than Punia along with Sihag,Godara,Saran,Beniwal and Johiya migrated to north Rajasthan region known as Jangladesh and ruled there till 15th century .

Hukam Singh Pawar (Pauria)[14] states: The companion princes of Harshavardhana, i.e. Kumaragupta III and Madhavagupta belonged to the Mallava tribe (Malloi) and Bhandi was a Poni. Mahasenagupta, the mother of Prabhakarvardhana, the grand-mother of Harsha, was a princess of the Gupta (Dharana) lineage. King Grahavarman, husband of Rajyashri was a Maukhari. The Jats have among them the Kuntals, Mall or Malli; Poni or Punia or Paunyas, Dharanas as well as Mukharis or Mokharias. This does not seem to be a mere coincidence.


According to Hukam Singh Pawar (Pauria) [15], In all probability the Punia or Pauniyas belong to the followers of Pani leader Bribu. It is possible that a branch of Pani or Puni migrated from Sapta Sindhu to south India where they were known as Pani [16] or Paunika [17], identified [18], [19], [20] with the Punaka-Visaya of Talegaon inscription i.e. modern Poona or Pune, which may be their earlier settlement. The Punaiyyas or Panayyas of the South also betray their ancestry from the Panis. While Sivis, Mallavas etc. migrated from the Indus Valley after Alexander’s invasion to Rajasthan where they still survive in the Sivis, Shivranas, Mall or Malli Jats, the Punia or Pauniya Jats of Rajasthan, are likely to be the descendants [21] of the Panis, who were deprived of their wealth [22] by their brethren Aryan opponents, and were compelled [23] to settle down in their new home from the valley much earlier. The Punias were allowed by Aryans to remain in their Indian home in return for liberal donations by Bribu [24], [25], [26] to the Aryans (the Bharatas) for which he was held in high esteem by them where as the rest of Panis, who refused to donate likewise, were chased [27], [28] to the western lands. Babylonia, known as Brbyru to the Vedic Indians, is said to be the city of Bribu, (a wealthy leader of the Panis), by Weber, (Kalyanaramana, 1969, 112). It is interesting to note that the leaders of Panis who migrated [29], [30] to America in the pre-Aztec times from India, are depicted as robust, standing erect with folded hands, having Rajasthani features, with their head adorned with Marwari pagrees. [31]

B S Dahiya[32] writes: The people called Paunikas (Paunas) are mentioned in Vayu Purana. They were ruling near Jagadhari on the Yamuna river and their epigraph has been found at Jagatgram near Chuhadpur in Dehradun district. [33] Herodotus mentions a people, Paeonia, a colony of Teucarians. [34] The paeonians were transferred from Hellespont to Asia, under the orders of Darius the great. Here we have the Pauniya and Tokhar Jats in Europe in sixth century BC.

The philosophy of their origin from the locks of Shiva indicates that they belong to the Naga race. Shivi and Taxak were neighbourers. After the attack of Alexander the Shivi and Taxak people moved down Panjab and occupied Jangladesh. Punia Gotra Jats were one of them to occupy parts of Jangladesh, that corresponds to the former princely state of Bikaner. They reached here in early period of christian era and ruled till 15th century when Rathores occupied the Jangladesh. [35]

Rathores under the leadership of Bika and Kandal were spreading their rule in Jangladesh. At that time Punia Jat were ruling six states and about 300 villages. The extent of rule of Punias spread from Jhansal, which was their capital, to Marod. Marod town is situated at a distance of about 40 kms from present Rajgarh town in Rajasthan. Godara Jats had aligned with Rathores due to which Punias faced a defeat and moved to Uttar Pradesh. Punias had strongly retaliated and were able to kill Rathore Raja Rai Singh.

Beeka, the founder of Rathore supremacy in Bikaner, died in S. 1551 (1495 AD). Kalyan Singh succeeded in S. 1603. He had three sons, 1, Rae Singh; 2, Ram Singh ; and 3, Pirthi Singh. Rae Singh succeeded in S. 1630 (a.d. 1573). Until this reign, the Jats had, in a great degree, preserved their ancient privileges. Ram Singh, at the same time, completely subjugated the Johyas, who, always troublesome, had recently attempted to regain their ancient independence. Ram Singh, having destroyed the power of future resistance in the Johyas, turned his arms against the Puniya Jats, the last who preserved their ancient liberty. They were vanquished, and the Rajpoots were inducted into their most valuable possessions. But the conqueror paid the penalty of his life for the glory of colonising the lands of the Puniyas. He was slain in their expiring effort to shake off the yoke of the stranger ; and though the Ramsingotes add to the numerical strength, and enlarge the territory of the heirs of Beeka, they, like the Kandulotes, little increase the power of the state, to which their obedience is nominal. Sidhmukh and Sankhoo are the two chief places of the Ramsingotes. Thus, with the subjugation of the Puniyas, the political annihilation of the six Jat cantons of the desert was accomplished. [36]

Villages founded by Punia clan

  1. Pooniyon Ka Tala (tahsil - Gudha Malani)
  2. Pooniyon Ka Tala (tahsil - Ramsar)
  3. Pooniyon Ka Tala (tahsil - Baytoo)
  • Sankhu (सांखू) is a town of historical importance located in Churu district of Rajasthan. Founded by Poonia Jats. It was one of their districts.

Migration of Punia's

Traditionally Jats consider their origin from the far northwest and claimed ancient Garh Gajni (modernday area between Ghajni, Afghanistan to Rawalpindi, Pakistan) as their original abode.[38] Persian chronicler Firishta strengthened this view and informs us that Jats were originally living near the river of the Koh-i-Jud (Salt Range) in northwest Punjab.[39] The Jats then occupied the Indus valley and settled themselves on both the banks of the Indus River.

By the fourth century region of Multan was under their control.[40] Then they rose to the sovereign power and their ruler Jit Salindra, who promoted the renown of his race, started the Jat colonisation in Punjab and fortified the town Salpur/Sorpur, near Multan.[41]By the end of seventh century, Jats were thickly populated in Deybal region.[42]Their main population was settled in the lower Sindh.The Chachnama stratified these large population of Jats, as 'the western Jats' (Jatan-i-Gharbi) and 'the eastern Jats' (Jatan-i-Sharqi), [43] living on the eastern and western side of the Indus River. The chronicler s further classified them as 'The Jats living on the banks of the rivers (Lab-i-Daryayi) [44] and the Jats living in plain, desert (Jatan-i-Dashti); and 'the rustic Jats' (rusta'i Jat) living in villages.[45]As Jataki, the peculiar dialect of the Jats, also proves that the Jats must have come from the NW Punjab and from other districts (e.g. Multan) dependent upon the great country of the Five rivers.[46]

By the end of fifth and the beginning of the sixth century, Punia's and Jat's southward migration, second in line, took place and they reached Kota in Rajasthan, probably via Bikaner regions. From Kota they migrated further east and established their rule at Malwa under the rule of Salichandra, son of Vira Chandra. Salichandra erected a minster (mindra) on banks of the river Taveli in Malwa.[47] Probably after their defeat by Sultan Mahmud in 1027 AD, and later hard pressed by the Ghaznavi Turkish Commander, the Jats of Sind again migrated to Rajasthan and settled themselves in Bundi regions.[48] The second inscription found at Bundi probably dates from circa samvat 1191 (1135 AD) possibly refers to the Jats as opponents of the Parmara rulers of Rajasthan.[49]

When Muhammad bin Qasim attacked Dahlilah, a fortified town in between Roar and Brahmanabad, most of the inhabitants (the Jats) had abandoned the place and migrated to Rajasthan via desert and took shelter in the country of Siru (modern Sirohi distict) which was then ruled by King Deva Raj, a cousin of Rai Dahir.[50]

However, the third migration took place in early eighth century, Sihag,Godara,Saran, Punia's and Jats of lower Sind migrated to Rajasthan, probably via Barmer regions to Bikaner, Ganganagar and Hanumangarh. By the twelfth century, the Jats settled in western Punjab, as the native poet Abul Farj Runi mentions them along with the Afghans.[48] Meanwhile, they also extended their abode in the eastern part of the Punjab (now Haryana to Sirsa and Hisar), as in the end of the twelfth century they resisted Qutb-ud-din Aybak in the region of Hansi.[51]

Thakur Deshraj writes on Punias

Following is the English translation of History of Punias mentioned by Thakur Deshraj pages 617 and 618 from the Book Jat Itihas (History of the Jats), 1992 edition: Publisher: Maharaja Surajmal Smarak Shiksah Sanstha, C-4 Janak Puri, New Delhi 110058.

"The Puniyas are Naga clans, and Punia is derived from Naga. The Hissar Gazetteer says that they consider themselves to be of the Shiva Gotr (clan) and there is reference to them being descended from Mahadev (Shiva)’s locks. Shivi and Takshak people lived contagiously- side by side. These two evolved into being followers of Shaivism.

Following the invasion by Sikandar(Alexander) some of the Shivi and Takshak clans came down below Punjab. Some out of these established their hold on Jangal Pradesh. The Puniyas too arose of such Jat groups who established their hold on a country and utilized for a very long time. They reached Jangal Pradesh by the time of commencement of the Christian era , current era. They governed this land upto the 15th century CE.

At the time of the arrival of the group of the Rathors under Bika and Kaandal, the Punia Sardars or chieftains had 300 villages under their sway. They had been independent from many generations. In addition they had six other republics of the Jats in Jangal Pradesh.

Ram Ratan Charan in his “History of Rajputana” in Hindi, refers to these six realms as ‘Bhumiyachare” i.e. republics. Reference to these republics is also found in 'Bharat ke Desi Rajya’, 'Tarikh Raajgahn Hind’ , ‘Vakaye Rajputana’, and many other history books. We(Thakur Deshraj) have written our account on the basis of these historical Texts.

At that time, the capital was Jhansal, which is on the boundary of modern Hissar. Ram Ratan Charan calls this capital as Luddhi in his book.

Their Raja was Kanhadev at that time. Kanhadev was a great leader and a fearless warrior who could never be defeated. His Punia clan brethren followed his wishes. Republics are defeated by internal dissent. His Puniya society had unity. He did not have a large standing military force, but he had no shortage of young warriors, who lived at home, and who rose to arms as soon as the call came from their leader. Every Puniya citizen considered the whole republic as of his own. They were ready to bear all hardships. They however would not tolerate a person from another community to rule over them. Their mental makeup made them refuse to accept rule by Bika. They kept fighting for their independence as long as they had young men who could come to the force. The Rahtors managed to take control of their homesteads one at a time. In the end the Rahtors constructed forts in the middle of their lands. The Rahtors would make these forts in the day, and in the night the Puniyas would break them down. The folk traditions state that some Puniyas were buried alive in the walls of some of these forts.

After much struggle the Puniyas were defeated. Some of them then migrated towards the United Provinces (modern Uttar Pradesh). The Rahtors had a big army, the Godara Jats also gave them their assistance. That is why the Puniyas lost.

It was , however, a matter of pride, that seeking to protect their Independence, they never showed cowardice. Rivers of blood were flowed by them. In revenge for the ill treatment of the leaders by the enemy, they defeated and took prisoner and killed the Rathor King Rai Singh. Reference to this act of revenge by the Puniyas is found in the book – ‘Bharat ke Desi Rajya’ (Eng- Indigenous Kingdoms of India).

The republic of the Puniyas spread from Jhansal (on the boundary of Modern Hissar, to Marod. Marod is 12 kos south of Rajgarh. The folk legends tell us, that one Sadhu told a Puniya leader, that whatever land he could cover on a mare, that will be governed by the Puniyas. The Mare was let loose and at Sunset , she reached Marod and died. At that time the Puniyas Sardar (chieftain) said:

“The journey from Jhansal ended at Marodh. The mare died but no regret.”

Traces of the old capital of the Puniyas, Jhansal where there was their fort, can still be found. Such traces are also still found in Balsamand.

The Rathor Raja would pay an annual fee to some of the Puniya chieftains to keep them peaceful and quiet. Even until recent times, there was a tradition of receiving clothing and some money from Raja annually by these Puniya leaders as a tribute."

ठाकुर देशराज लिखते हैं

ठाकुर देशराज लिखते हैं कि पोनियां सर्पों की एक नस्ल होती है। इस नाम से जान पड़ता है कि यह नागवंशी हैं। ‘हिसार गजिटियर’ में लिखा हुआ है कि - “ये अपने को शिव गोत्री मानते हैं, साथ ही महादेव की जटाओं से निकलने का भी जिक्र करते हैं।” शिव और तक्षक लोग पड़ौसी थे। साथ ही दोनों ही समुदाय आगे चलकर शैव मतानुयायी भी हो गए थे। इसलिए उनका निकट सम्बन्ध है। सिकन्दर के आक्रमण के पश्चात् शिवोई (शिवी) और तक्षक वंशी लोग पंजाब से नीचे उतर आए थे। उनमें से ही कुछ लोगों ने जांगल-प्रदेश को अधिकार में कर एक लम्बे अर्से तक उसका उपयोग किया था। जांगल-प्रदेश में ईशा के आरम्भिक काल में पहुंच गए थे। उन्होंने इस भूमि पर पन्द्रहवीं शताब्दी के काल तक राज्य किया है। जिन दिनों राठौरों का दल बीका और कान्दल के संचालन में जांगल-प्रदेश में पहुंचा था, उस समय पोनियां सरदारों के अधिकार में 300 गांव थे। वे कई पीढ़ी पहले से स्वतंत्रता का उपभोग करते चले आ रहे थे। उन्हीं के छः राज्य जाटों के जांगल-प्रदेश में और भी थे। रामरत्न चारण ने ‘राजपूताने के इतिहास’ में इन राज्यों को भौमियाचारे राज्य लिखा है। इन राज्यों का वर्णन ‘भारत के देशी राज्य’ ‘तारीख राजगान हिन्द’ ‘वाकए-राजपूताना’ आदि कई इतिहासों में है। हमने भी प्रायः सारा वर्णन उन्हीं इतिहासों के आधार पर लिखा है। उस समय इनकी राजधानी झांसल थी जो कि हिसार जिले की सीमा पर है। रामरत्न चारण ने अपने इतिहास में इनकी राजधानी लुद्धि नामक नगर में बतायी है। उस समय इनका राजा कान्हादेव था। कान्हादेव स्वाभिमानी और कभी न हारने वाला योद्धा था। उसके अन्य पूनियां भाई भी उसकी आज्ञा में थे। गणराज्यों को फूट नष्ट करती है। उसके पोनियां समाज में एकता थी। प्रति़क्षण उपस्थित रहने वाली सेना तो कान्हदेव के पास अधिक न थी, किन्तु उसके पास उन नवयुवक सैनिकों की कमी नहीं थी, जो अपने-अपने घर पर रहते थे और जब भी कान्हदेव की आज्ञा उनके पास पहुंचती थी, बड़ी प्रसन्नता से जत्थे के जत्थे उसकी सेवा में हाजिर हो जाते थे। प्रत्येक पोनियां अपने राज्य को अपना समझता था। वे सब कुछ बर्दाश्त करने को तैयार थे। किन्तु यह उनके लिए असह्य था कि अपने ऊपर अन्य जाति का मनुष्य शासन करता। ऐसी उनकी मनोवृत्ति थी जिसके कारण उन्होंने बीका


जाट इतिहास:ठाकुर देशराज,पृष्ठान्त-617


की अधीनता को स्पष्ट रूप से अस्वीकार कर दिया था। वे अपनी स्वाधीनता बनाए रखने के लिए उस समय तक लड़ते रहे जब तक कि उनके समूह के अन्दर नौजवानों की संख्या काफी रही। उनके स्थानों पर राठौर अधिकार कर लेते थे। अन्त में राठौरों ने उनके दमन के लिए उनके बीच में गढ़ को ढहा देते थे। दन्तकथा के आधार पर कहा जाता है कि राजगढ़ के बुर्जो में कुछ पोनियां जाटों को चुन दिया था।

बड़े संघर्ष के बाद पोनियां लोग परास्त कर दिए गए। तब उनमें से कुछ यू.पी. की तरफ चले आये। राठौरों के पास सेना बहुत थी, गोदारे जाटों का समूह भी उनके साथ था। इसलिए पोनियां हार गए। पर यह पोनियों के लिए गौरव की बात ही रही कि स्वाधीनता की रक्षा के लिए उन्होंने कायरता नहीं दिखाई। उन्होंने खून की नदियां बहा दीं। वे बदला चाहते थे, उनके हृदय में आग जल रही थी। उनके नेताओं के साथ जो घात सरदारों ने किया था, उसका प्रतिकार पोनियों ने राठौर नरेश रायसिंह का वध करके किया। ‘भारत के देशी राज्य’ में भी पोनियों के द्वारा बदला लेने की बात लिखी है।

पोनियां जाटों के राज्य की सीमा झांसल (हिसार की सीमा) से मरोद तक थी। मरोद राजगढ़ के दक्षिण में 12 कोस की दूरी पर है। दन्त कथाओं के अनुसार किसी साधु ने पोनियां सरदार से कहा था कि घोड़ी पर चढ़कर जितनी जमीन भूमि दबा लेगा, वह सब पोनियों के राज्य में आ जाएगी। निदान सरदार ने ऐसा ही किया। घोड़ी दिन भर छोड़ने के बाद सांयकाल मरोद में पहुंचने पर मर गई। उस समय पोनियां सरदार ने कहा था-

“झासल से चाल मरोदा आई। मर घोड़ी पछतावा नांही।”

पोनियों की पुरानी राजधानी झांसल में जहां उनका दुर्ग था, कुछ निशान अब तक पाए जाते हैं। बालसमंद में भी ऐसे ही चिन्ह पाए जाते हैं।

राठौर राजा इनके वंशधरों को सन्तुष्ट रखने के लिए कुछ उनके मुखियों को देते रहे। कुछ समय पहले ही दश पोशाक और कुछ नकद के प्रति वर्ष राज से पाते हैं।

द्वारका से सम्बन्ध

नागों का वास: कुछ ऒर प्रमाण भी मिलते हैं जिससे सिद्ध होता है कि द्वारका क्षेत्र में आर्यों के आगमन से पहले नागों का वास था। पाताळ में बसने वाले नाग समुद्र से आकर इस क्षेत्र में बसे थे। इस प्रदेश के नाग द्वारका सहित समस्त सौराष्ट्र प्रदेश के संपर्क में थे। स्कंदपुराण के कुमारिका खंड में पातालपुरी को अत्यंत समृद्ध महाप्रसादों तथा मणिरत्नों से अलंकृत एवं स्वरूपवती नागकन्याओं से युक्त बताया गया है। यदुवंश के संस्थापक यदु का विवाह धौम्रवर्ण की पांच नाग कन्याओं के साथ हुआ था। कुशस्थली (द्वारका) का राजा रैवत मूल से तक्षक नाग था। [52]

शिव पुराण के अनुसार इसका एक प्रसिद्ध नाम दारुका वन (Mbt:V.82.22) था , जहाँ नागों का निवास था। आर्यों ने उन्हें वर्णाश्रम-धर्म का अनुयायी बनाया और नागेश्वर ज्योतिर्लिंग की स्थापना की। ब्रह्माण्डपुराण (3.7.100) के अनुसार कश्यप का पुत्र यक्ष (गुह्यक) था, जिसे पञ्चचूड़ा क्रतुस्थला नाम की अप्सरा से रजतनाथ नामक पुत्र उत्पन्न हुआ और उनके मणिवर तथा मणिभद्र नाम के दो पुत्र हुए। इनमें मणिभद्र का विवाह पुण्यजनी नाम की कन्या से हुआ। इस पुण्यजनी की संतानें पुण्यजनी कहलाई। इनका कुछ दिनों तक इस क्षेत्र पर अधिपत्य रहा और कालांतर में भीस्मक के पुत्र रुक्मी ने इन्हें पराजित कर भगाया था । तभी द्वारका उजड़ गयी थी और इसी उजड़ी हुई द्वारका को कृष्ण ने फिर से बसाया था. सम्भवतः इसी कारण महाभारत में द्वारका के 'पुनर्निवेशनम्' शब्द का प्रयोग किया है। [53]

विजयेन्द्र कुमार माथुर[54] लिखते हैं कि कुशस्थली द्वारका का ही प्राचीन नाम है। पौराणिक कथाओं के अनुसार महाराजा रैवतक के कुश बिछाकर यज्ञ करने के कारण इसका नाम कुशस्थली नाम पड़ा। पीछे त्रिविक्रम भगवान् कुश नामक दानव का वध भी यहीं किया था। त्रिविक्रम का मंदिर भी द्वारका में रणछोड़ जी के मंदिर के पास है। ऐसा जान पड़ता है कि महाराज रैवतक (बलराम की पत्नी रेवती के पिता) ने प्रथम बार, समुद्र में से कुछ भूमि बाहर निकलकर यह नगरी बसाई थी। हरिवंश पुराण (1.1.4) के अनुसार कुशस्थली उस प्रदेश का नाम था जहाँ यादवों ने द्वारका बसाई थी। विष्णु पुराण के अनुसार, आनर्तस्यापि रेवतनामा पुत्रोजज्ञे योऽसावानर्त विषयं बुभुजे पुरीं च कुशस्थली मध्युवास अर्थात आनर्त के रेवत नामक पुत्र हुआ जिसने कुशस्थली नामक पुरी में रहकर आनर्त विषय पर राज्य किया। एक प्राचीन किंवदंती में द्वारका का सम्बन्ध पुण्यजनों से बताया गया है। ये पुण्यजन वैदिक पाणिक या पणि हो सकते हैं। अनेक विद्वानों का मत है कि ये प्राचीन ग्रीस के फिनिशियनों का ही भारतीय नाम है। ये अपने को कुश की सन्तान मानते थे। (वेडल: मेकर्स ऑफ़ सिविलाइजेशन पृ.80) हमारा मत है कि ये पूनिया जाट ही थे।

Chronology and origin of the gotra

THE BRANCH OF PURU

The historian Ram Swarup Joon has given the chronology of Virabhadra, obtained from the records of the Bards of Dholpur, in his book ‘History of the Jats’ (1938, 1967) as under: [55]

(Obtained from the records of the Bards of Dholpur - after English Generation)
From : 		      Sanyati:
			     |
			 Vir Bhadra( 4 sons)
                       |
_________________________________________________________
|	             |	         | 	             | 
Pon Bhadra  KalhanBhadra Atisur Bhadra          Jakh Bhadra
(Originator (Originator	    |	           (Originator
Punya	      Kalhan       |		        Jakhar
Gotra)	     Gotra)	        |	        Gotra)
 
			    Anjana Jata Shankar
			   	    |		            |
			   Dahi Bhadra	              Brahma Bhadra
			   (Originator
			   Dahiya
			   Gotra)

Note:

According to the Bhats (bards) of the Dahiya Gotra, the descendants. Of the above spread to the following areas

(a) Pon Bhadra’s to Haryana, Brij, and Gwalior

(b) Kalhan Bhadra’s to KathiAwar and Gujrat.

(c) Atisur Bhadra’s to Malwa

(d) Jakh Bhadra’s to Punjab and Kashmir

(e) Dahi Bhadra’s to Punjab and Central Asia

(f) Brahma Bhadra’s by the name of Bamroliya to Jammu and Kashmir, Haridwar and Punjab (the ruling family of Dholpur is from this branch)

Raja Vir Bhadra had five sons and two grand sons named Pon Bhadra, Jakh Bhadra, Kalhan Bhadra, Brahma Bhadra, Ati Sur Bhadra, Dahi Bhadra and Anjana Jata Shankar. Seven major Jat gotras are named after these seven descendants of Vir Bhadra. A detailed account of these is found in the family history of Rana of Dholpur. This proves the descent of some Jats from Vir Bhadra.

  • Pon Bhadra is the originator of Punia gotra.
  • Kalhan Bhadra is the originator of Kalhan gotra.
  • Atisur Bhadra had Ajana Jata Shankar and his son Dahi Bhadra in the lineage. Dahi Bhadra is the originator of Dahiya gotra.
  • Jakh Bhadra is the originator of Jakhar gotra.

Ram Swarup Joon has given the chronology of this gotra, obtained from the records of the Bards of Dholpur, in his book ‘History of the Jats’ (1938, 1967) as under:

In the branch of Puru there was ‘Sanyati’ whose son was Virabhadra. Virabhadra had four sons 1. Pon Bhadra 2. Kalhan bhadra 3. Atisur Bhadra and 4. Jakh Bhadra.

  • Pon Bhadra is the originator of Punia gotra.
  • Kalhan Bhadra is the originator of Kalhan gotra.
  • Atisur Bhadra had Ajanta Jata Shankar and his son Dahi Bhadra in the lineage. Dahi Bhadra is the originator of Dahiya gotra.
  • Jakh Bhadra is the originator of Jakhar gotra.


According to the bards of Dahiyas, the descendants of above spread as under:

(a) Pon Bhadra’s to Haryana, Brij, and Gwalior

(b) Kalhan Bhadra’s to KathiAwar and Gujarat.

(c) Atisur Bhadra’s to Malwa

(d) Jakh Bhadra’s to Punjab and Kashmir

(e) Dahi Bhadra’s to Punjab and Central Asia

Visit of Punia kingdom by Fa-Hien

The Chinese traveller Fa-Hien reached Mathura after crossing Sindhu River through the following route:

Udyana (present Swat) >>Kandahar>>Taxila>>Purushpur>>Hilda>>Kigdom of Lo-e>>Kingdom of Poh-na >>Bhida (Punjab)>>Mathura

The text of Fa-Hien's account of his journey through Punjab is described by him in Chapter - XIV of the book by JAMES LEGGE : A RECORD OF BUDDHISTIC KINGDOMS

[56]

"CHAPTER XIV: DEATH OF HWUY-KING IN THE LITTLE SNOWY MOUNTAINS. LO-E. POHNA. CROSSING THE INDUS TO THE EAST.

Having stayed there till the third month of winter, Fa-hien and the two others,(1) proceeding southwards, crossed the Little Snowy mountains.(2) On them the snow lies accumulated both winter and summer. On the north (side) of the mountains, in the shade, they suddenly encountered a cold wind which made them shiver and become unable to speak. Hwuy-king could not go any farther. A white froth came from his mouth, and he said to Fa-hien, "I cannot live any longer. Do you immediately go away, that we do not all die here;" and with these words he died.(3) Fa-hien stroked the corpse, and cried out piteously, "Our original plan has failed;—it is fate.(4) What can we do?" He then again exerted himself, and they succeeded in crossing to the south of the range, and arrived in the kingdom of Lo-e,(5) where there were nearly three thousand monks, students of both the mahayana and hinayana. Here they stayed for the summer retreat,(6) and when that was over, they went on to the south, and ten days' journey brought them to the kingdom of Poh-na,(7) where there are also more than three thousand monks, all students of the hinayana. Proceeding from this place for three days, they again crossed the Indus, where the country on each side was low and level.(8)

NOTES

(1) These must have been Tao-ching and Hwuy-king.

(2) Probably the Safeid Koh, and on the way to the Kohat pass.

(3) All the texts have Kwuy-king. See chapter xii, note 13.

(4) A very natural exclamation, but out of place and inconsistent from the lips of Fa-hien. The Chinese character {.}, which he employed, may be rendered rightly by "fate" or "destiny;" but the fate is not unintelligent. The term implies a factor, or fa-tor, and supposes the ordination of Heaven or God. A Confucian idea for the moment overcame his Buddhism.

(5) Lo-e, or Rohi, is a name for Afghanistan; but only a portion of it can be here intended.

(6) We are now therefore in 404 AD.

(7) No doubt the present district of Bannu, in the Lieutenant-Governorship of the Punjab, between 32d 10s and 33d 15s N. lat., and 70d 26s and 72d E. lon. See Hunter's Gazetteer of India, i, p. 393.

(8) They had then crossed the Indus before. They had done so, indeed, twice; first, from north to south, at Skardo or east of it; and second, as described in chapter vii."

Conclusions

1. James Legge has commented at footnote – 5 that Fa-Hien crossed through the Kingdom of Lo-e that means `Rohi'. In Rajasthan Rohi means land. Fa-Hien had moved through the Land of Ponya or Punia. Here James Legge could not properly understand about the Kingdom of Lo-e. Dr Natthan Singh has mentioned in Jat Itihasa (page 113) about the existence of Rohe tribe in Afghanistan, the descendants of whom are Rohela or Ruhela Jats found in Rajasthan. Here it is interesting to note that in Afghanistan O and U are interchangable. Similarly L and R are also interchangable. Thus what Fa-Hien mentions as Kingdom of Lo-e is the Kingdom of Ruhela Jats in Afghanistan.

2.He has interpreted Poh-na as Bannu in Punjab. In fact it is used for Ponya.

3. This period was 404 AD.

4. This period pertains to the rule of Punia Jats in Punjab, Haryana and part of Rajasthan. This has been mentioned by Thakur Deshraj (page 617) that the capital of Punias was at Jhasal near border of Hisar district.

5. Ram Swarup Joon has also mentioned about Punia clan – "They are found in Bikaner, Luharu and district Hissar in large numbers. They had their capital in Bikaner. The Ponya king drove out the Dahiya rulers of Jodhpur region. They have about 100 villages in Rajgarh region. They are still found in large numbers in Deraghazi Khan and Bannu and they're all of who are followers of Islam. They have 100 villages in Tehsil in Dadri and about 10 in Aligarh. A few of them inhabit Rohtak also."

6. James Legge did not have idea about Punia clan, but Fa-Hien had clearly written it as Kingdom of Poh-na which means The Kingdom of Ponya or Punias. The Ruhela and Punia kigdoms were in neighbourhood at that time in Afghanistan.

7. Y and J are interchangeable. `Punjab' can be written as `Punyab'. Punyab=Punya+ab means the land of Punya.

8. Punya as tribe has been mentioned in Rigveda also in Punjab. Punjab must derive its name from Punya, which later was interpreted as land of five rivers.

Paionoi of Greeks

H. W. Bellew[57] writes that Herodotus gives some other instances of the transplanting of nations and tribes by king Darius after his return from the Skythian expedition. He says (Bk. v.) that, " Darius commanded Magabazus, whom he had left as his general in Thrakia, to remove the Paionoi from their abodes, and to bring to him themselves, their children, and their wives. "Magabazus accordingly


[Page-54]: invaded Paionia, and took- possession of their towns, and the Paionoi immediately gave themselves up to the Persians. Thus the Siropaionoi and Paioplai, and the tribes of the Paionoi as far as the Lake Prasias were removed from their abodes, and transported into Asia. But those about Mount Pangaius and near the Doberoi, the Agrianai, Odomantoi, and those who inhabit Lake Prasias itself, were not at all subdued by Megabazus. . . . Those of the Paionoi then who were subdued were taken to Asia. . . . Megabazus, leading with him the Paionoi, arrived at the Hellespont, and having crossed over from thence, came to Sardis, bringing the Paionoi with him. . . . The Paionoi, who had been carried away captive by Megabazus from the river Strymon, occupied a tract in Phrygia, and a village by themselves." The tribes named as thus transported into Phrygia are the Paioni, the Paioplai, and the Doberi. The Paioni on the river Strymon, not far from the Hellespont, were a branch of the Panni, or Pannoni, who gave their name to the country called Pannonia ; and the Paioplai and Doberi appear to have been clans of the same tribe. Anyhow, we find in Afghanistan at the present day tribes bearing the same names, viz. : the Panni, the Popali, or Popalzi, and the Dawari; and all settled together in the Kandahar country, where, curiously enough, they have a ridge of hill and a district, with its village, called Panjwai, which may stand for the Pangains of Herodotus. Formerly the Panni was a numerous and important tribe in Afghanistan, but in the time of the Lodi kings of Delhi, they, along with several other important tribes of Afghanistan, emigrated bodily to Hindustan, where they established small colonies in various parts of the country, as in Hydrabad of the Dakhan, in Barar, Karaoli, Shekhawati, and other parts of Central India, Rajwarra, etc., leaving but few of the tribe in Afghanistan.

Dr S.M. Yunus Jaffery[58] writes that under the same entry, the quotation of Adib Peshawar has also been given. Probably he has written about the Jats in Afghanistan:

“They are a clan of Hindus, now most of them have been honoured to adopt the Islamic faith. In the verbal history I have been told that people of Panni clan in Afghanistan are Jats in their origin. There are some small pockets of Jats in towns like Roudsar".

Punia Khap

Punia Khap is a big khap of 360 villages. In Rajasthan there are 100 villages of this khap around Rajgarh in Churu district, 150 villages in Bhiwani district Haryana, 94 villages in Aligarh district, 10 in Meerut district, 2 in Muradabad district in Uttar Pradesh. 9 villages are in Jalandhar district in Punjab. [59]

Distribution in Rajasthan

Locations in Jaipur city

Adarsh Nagar, Ajmeri Road, Ambabari, Bapu Nagar, Barkat Nagar, C Scheme, Gandhi Nagar, Ganesh Colony (Khatipura), Ganpati Nagar, Hanuman Nagar, Harmara, Jawahar Nagar, Jhotwara, Khatipura, Machra, Mahavir Nagar I, Malviya Nagar, Mansarowar Colony, Moti Nagar, Murlipura Scheme, Niwai, Queens Road, RFC Colony, Sanganer, Shastri Nagar, Sindhi camp, Sodala, Station Road, Uniyaron ka Rasta, Vaishali Nagar, Vidyadhar Nagar, Vidyut Nagar, VKIA,

Villages in Jaipur district

Poonya (पून्या) Jats live in villages: Beesaloo (2), Bhanupura (14), Poonya ki Dhani (1), Jatwara Jaipur Puniya(पुनिया) Jats live in villages: Anantpura (Dudu), Bansa Titaria (3), Bas Brijnathpura (4), Devnagar Ladana (1), Gangati Kalan, Gopalnagar (2), Jagatpura, Jaiwalya ki Dhani (1), Jobner, Khatwar, Laxmipura (1), Mundiya Garh, Sambharia (3), Rojri, Jaitpura Amber, Samota Ka Bas,

Villages in Jhunjhunu district

Alipur, Bangothadi, Bay, Bhadunda Khurd, Bharu Ka Bas, Bidasar, Bijnai Ka Bas (Raghunathpura), Godoo Ka Bas, Hetamsar, Keharpura Khurd, Kumawas, Marodha, Meethwas, Mehrdasi, Mohabbatsari (near Mukundgarh), Poonia Ka Bas, Puniya Ka Bas, Raghunathpura, Shithal, Shyampura Nua, Tigiyas, Togra Kalan,

Villages in Sikar district

Akwa (25), Bagas, Balod Bari, Beri, Bibipur Bara, Bibipur, Bidsar, Chudi Miyan, Chuwas, Dhandhan (15), Dujod, Gungara (Piprali), Hapas, Hudera, Jajod, Kishanpura, Kishanpura, Lalpur, Mandela, Mirjwas, Nabipura, Punia Ka Bas, Punia ka Bas, Rughnathpura, Rajpur Laxmangarh, Sikar, Tajsar, Tarpura, Vijaypura (Rulyanimali)

Villages in Churu district

Abasar, Baniyala, Bheemsana, Beenjawas, Bewar, Bhainsli, Bhojan, Bidasar, Biramsar, Buchawas, Dalman (10), Deengli, Dhani Poonia, Dhandhal Shera, Gagarwas, Geenadi Chhoti, Gwalisar, Hamusar (2), Hardesar, Harpalukubri, Hamirwas, Hira Ka Bas (Rajgarh), Indasar, Janau, Jatuvas, Jharsar Chhota, Juharpura, Kadia, Kalri, Kalwas Taranagar, Kanoota, Khairoo Chhoti, Khyali, Mehri, Mundi Tal, Navan (Rajgarh), Navrangpura, Pabasi, Parihara, Ragha Chhoti, Rajgarh Churu, Rejari, Rolasar, Sardarpura, Seowa, Suratpura (Rajgarh), Thathawata, Thelasar, Thirpali, Tidiyasar (20),

Villages in Bikaner district

Badnu, Kapoorisar, Khajuwala,

Villages in Dausa district

Jat Ki Dhani, Raipura

Villages in Bharatpur district

Basaiya Abhai,Vaulkhera,

Villages in Ganganagar district

Amarpura Jatan, Chak 1F Chhoti, Daulatpura, Kupli, Ratanpura, Sihagonwali Dhani, Telanwali,

Villages in Hanumangarh district

Bhainsli, Bharwana, Bijhanwas, Deeplana, Dhaban, Dudali, Fefana, Gillwala, Jhansal, Jhasal, Katheda, Malarampura, Malkhera, Mallarkhera, Nathwana, Nathwania, Panchkosi, Ramgarh, Ramgarh Ujjalwas, Ratanpura Rawatsar, Saharni, Sangaria Sihagawali, Bharwana,

Villages in Barmer district

Aasupura, Balotra, Barmer, Baytu, Beriyon Ka Bas, Beriwala Tala (बेरीवाला तला), Bor Charnan, Chicharli (चिचडली), Dharasar, Gwalnada, Harpuniyon Wala, Kalewa, Kharawala, Pooniyon Ki Basti, Mandrooponiyon Ki Dhani, Pooniyon Ka Tala, Pooniyon Ki Beri, Pooniyon Ka Tala (t.Gudha Malani) , Pooniyon Ki Beri (t.Gudha Malani), Pooniyon Ka Tala (t.Ramsar), Sodiyar, Utarlai,

Villages in Jodhpur district

Barliya, Beejasani, Bheekam Kor, Bisalpur, Boyal, Daikara, Falaudi, Gharaw (2), Jatwas, Jodhpur, Nandara Kalan, Paldi Siddha, Pichiyak, Raimalwara, Ram Nagar Kalan (6), Riya Sethon Ki, Salwa Kalla, Pooniyon Ki Pyau

Villages in Nagaur district

Beechawa, Bhagwanpura, Chau, Chau, Chhapri Khurd, Chuntisara, Deh, Dhamania, Dugastau, Gheerdoda Meetha, Hudas, Kasumbi, Nathawara, Nimbi Kalan, Rajlota, Ranwa, Rasal, Shyampura Ladnu,

Villages in Pali district

Chandawal Nagar, Dadia (Sehwaj), Jhujanda, Marwar Junction,

Villages in Jalor district

Lalji Ki Dungari,

Villages in Ajmer district

Sursura,

Villages in Sawai Madhopur district

Gangapur City,

Villages in Banswara district

Banswara,

Villages in Chittorgarh district

Biloda Chittorgarh, Jalaudia (3), Jamlawda (3), Pooniya Kheri, Rambhawli (4), Shambhupura, Soobi (2),

Villages in Tonk district

Nayagaon Ruwala (2), Motipura (3),

Villages in Jhalawar district

Poonya Khera (t. Manohar Thana) Punya Kheri (t.Jhalrapatan)

Villages in Rajsamand district

Puniyana,

Distribution in Haryana

Bhatu,

Villages in Ambala district

Jandli,

Villages in Yamunanagar district

Bal Chhapar, Garhi Mundo, Jathlana,

Villages in Jhajjar district

Khudan (खूडण),

Villages in Jind district

Akalgarh, Budha Khera Lather, Kachrana Kalan, Koyal, Sindhvi Khera, Udepur,

Villages in Hisar district

Biana Khera, Dhingsar, Gyanpura, Kharak Punia, Kharkari, Kirodi, Ladwa Hisar, Madanhedi, Matloda, Parbhuwala, Rajpura Sarhera, Sarsana, Satrod Kalan, Satrod Khurd, Udaypur,

Villages in Sirsa district

Chautala, Darba Kalan, Hanjira, Kharian, Madho Singhana, Pili Mandori Sirsa (पीली मंदोरी), Shakar Mandori (शकर मंदोरी),

Villages in Bhiwani district

Bhiwani, Dhani Mahu, Shyam Kalan,

Villages in Karnal district

Badota, Garhi Sadhan, Pathera,

Villages in Mahendragarh district

Nangal Shaloo,

Distribution in Uttar Pradesh

Villages in Joytiba phule nagar district

Akbarpur Patti,

Villages in Aligarh district

Bijauli,

Villages in Mathura district

Punia Khap has 11 villages in Mathura district. [60]

Villages in Muzaffarnagar district

Naik (Muzaffarnagar),

Villages in Agra district

Agra, Tikari,

Villages in Meerut district

Raghunathpur (Meerut),

Villages in Bagpat district

Sanoli

Villages in Bulandshahr district

Madona Jafrabad,

Villages in Firozabad district

Chhichhamai,

Distribution in Madhya Pradesh

Found in Mandsaur, Nimach districts.

Villages in Mandsaur district

Betikheri, Haidara Mata, Jaggakheri, Kacharia Jat, Laduna (Sitamau), Malhargarh, Nataram (Sitamau), Pipalkhuta, Ralayta (Multanpura), Ranayra (Sitamau),

Villages in Nimach district

Nimach (2), Aspura (1), Aghoriya (5), Dhokalkheda (9), Harnawda (21), Barkheda Jat (3), Hanumantia (1), Kesarpura (2), Khor Vikram (2), Nanpuriya (2), Nayagaon Jawad (1), Pawti (1),

Villages in Ratlam district

Villages in Ratlam district with population of Pooniya(पूनिया) gotra are:

Kalmoda 28,

Villages in Ratlam district with population of Puniya (पुनिया)/Punya (पुन्या) gotra are:

Dantodiya 1, Ghatwas 2, Ratlam 8, Banjali 1, Bardiya goyal 7, Berchha 1, Bhansa dabar 2, Bhatkheda 1, Bilpank 1, Borkheda 8, Chikliya 8, Damottar 1, Delanpur 1, Dhamottar 1, Dhaturiya 32, Dheekwa 1, Dodiana 1, Hat pipalya 1, Kalori 6, Kanser 7, Lapatia 2, Madhopura 1, Malakheda 7, Mundari 3, Nalkui 1, Surana 2, Virpura 29,

Villages in Indore district

Mend, Sherpur Indore,

Villages in Sehore district

Kalwana Sehore (5),

Villages in Vidisha district

Villages in Dewas district

Dhasad, Gadagaon, Olamba (1), Satwas,

Villages in Khargone district

Kogawan,

Villages in Harda district

Baidi, Bhadugaon, Nandara, Nayagaon, Rundlay, Sannasya, Sonkhedi, Tajpura,

Villages in Gwalior district

Birlanagar (Gwalior), Gwalior, Kithoda, Morar (Gwalior),

Villages in Sheopur district

Sheopur

Distribution in Maharashtra

Villages in Jalgaon district

Rajur,

Distribution in Punjab

Villages in Ludhiana district

Villages in Patiala district

Punia population is 5,400 in Patiala district.[61]

Villages in Nawanshahr district

Villages in Patiala district

Distribution in Pakistan

Hindu

Poonya Hindu Jats are residing in Umarkot, Tharparkar, Mirpurkhas and Sanghar districts of Sindh Province,Pakistan and Punjab (Pakistan).Poonya = 40 population in Khipro.

Muslim

The Punia were another Mulla Jat clan found mainly in Hissar and Sirsa. Like other Mulla Jat clans, they emigrated to Punjab (Pakistan) after partition.

Notable persons

  • Kanha Punia - Jat ruler of Jangladesh region in Rajasthan prior to annexation of it by Rathores in 15th century.
  • Ch. Tejinder Singh Punia D.R.O.- Garhi Mundo - Yamunanagar Haryana.
  • Swami Nityanand
  • Dr. Vijay Kumar Chaudhary (Poonia) - Retd. Professor Pathologist, presently residing at C-1, Sadul Gunj, Near Dhola Maru, Bikaner, Rajasthan.
  • Dr. Sharda Chaudhary (Poonia) Retd. Assoc. Professor Gynaecologist, presently residing at C-1, Sadul Gunj, Near Dhola Maru, Bikaner, Rajasthan.
  • Dr. Ajay Kumar Chaudhary (Poonia) - MBBS., MD Anesthesist presently working at Jaipur and residing at C-1, Sadul Gunj, Near Dhola Maru, Bikaner, Rajasthan.
  • Antar Singh Poonia - RAS (DEO, Ajmer,Rajasthan)
  • Chatar Singh Poonia -Air Wing commander, participient of II World War
  • Dr. D. P. Poonia - Principal, Medical College, Jodhpur
  • Navdeep Poonia - Cricket
  • Sunny Poonia - Player
  • N.L. Poonia - Sena medal
  • D.S. Poonia - IAS, Delhi
  • Manak Chand Yati (Pooniya) - Shiksha Sant from village Sodiyar (Barmer)
  • Jogendra Poonia - IRS, Rajasthan from village Jalipa (Barmer)
  • Pratap Bhanu Poonia - RAS, Rajasthan
  • Ram Swaroop Poonia, Sadulpur - Chief Vigilance Officer, Railways , IES - 1982
  • Jai Narayan Poonia - Sadulpur, Churu, Ex Cabinet Minister ,Govt of Rajasthan. elected in Rajathan Assembly as BJP MLA-2013 from Taranagar
  • Krishna Poonia - National woman discus throw champion of India, Arjun Award Winner 2010 (Athletics)
  • Sepoy Raj Kumar Punia - Martyr of Kargil War
  • Sh. Tejinder Singh Punia (D.R.O.) - Yamunanagar (Haryana)
  • Vijay Punia - Leader and Social worker
  • Sunil Poonia - BEST SHO in the world
  • N.L. Poonia - Sena medal awardee and Chairman of HSSC.
  • Major (Dr.) Surendra Poonia
  • Hari Singh Punia - RJS Rajasthan
  • Harsukh Ram Punia - RJS Rajasthan
  • O.P. Punia - Scientists (to see his contribution - Click here
  • Eng. Mahipal Singh Pauniya - Agra
  • Maj. R D Singh Pauniya - Originally from village Chaungwa, PO - Bijauli district Aligarh
  • Capt. J.S Punia - The Rajputhana Rifles, OP Cactus Lily Martyr 1971, Home state Rajasthan
  • Nb. Sub. Randhir Singh Punia - Brigade of The Guards, OP Pawan Martyr 17-06-1988, Home state Rajasthan
  • Rfn. Raj Kumar Punia - The Garhwal Rifles, OP Pawan Martyr 21-10-1987, Rajasthan
  • Naik Dinesh Kumar Punia - The Jat Regiment, OP Parakram Martyr 02-01-2002, Rajasthan
  • Sep. Babu Lal Poonia - Rashtriya Rifles, OP Rakshak (J&K) Martyr 21-08-2002, Rajasthan
  • Hav. Hanuman Ram Pooniya - Army Medical Corps Martyr 23-05-2002, Rajasthan
  • Sep. Bhanwal Lal Poonia - Army Medical Corps, Martyr 14-02-2002, Rajasthan
  • Kartar Singh Puniya - RAS, Asstt.Coll.& Exe.Magistrate, Kotputali, 9413377642, Village - Rejari, Teh.- Rajgarh Churu, Churu, Rajasthan, Present Address : 44, Guru Jambheswar Nagar-B, Gandhi Path, Jaipur, Email Address : kartarsinghpoonia@gmail.com
  • Jogendra Punia - RAS.
  • Kuldeep Poonia - Emerging Youth Leader of Puniya Khap from Harpalu.
  • Meera Punia - RAS
  • Kusum Puniya - IPS (2010), from village Sardarpura, tahsil Rajgarh, District Churu, Rajasthan.
  • Suman Punia - IIT (2010)
  • Antar Singh Poonia - RAS, Date of Birth : 2-February-1958, VPO- Bhensali,Teh.- Rajgarh Churu, Distt.- Churu, Rajasthan. Present Address : 125, Mahadev Nagar, Gandhi Path, Vaishali Nagar, Jaipur, Rajasthan.PIN - 302021 Mob. No. 9414212779, Resident Phone Number : 0141-2351301, Mobile Number : 9414002179, Email Address : ajaypoonia@hotmail.com
  • Himmat Singh Poonia - Rajasthan Accounts Service, Date of Birth : 1-June-1969. VPO - Suratpura, Teh.- Rajgarh Churu, Churu, Present Address : A-44, Jambeshwar Nagar, Queen's Road, Jaipur, Phone: 0141-2353300, Mob: 9414527945
  • Jile Singh Poonia - RPS, Date of Birth : 15-January-1947, VPO- Bhensali,Teh.- Rajgarh Churu, Distt.- Churu, Rajasthan. Present Address : 44, Suraj Nagar (East) Civil Lines, Jaipur, Rajasthan, Resident Phone Number : 0141-2222387, Mobile Number : 9828112387
  • Manphool Singh Poonia - IPS (1970)( Retd.), Date of Birth :1939, Village - Pabasi,P.O.- Dadrewa, Teh.- Rajgarh Churu, Distt.- Churu, Present Address : D-73, Amba Bari, Jaipur, Resident Phone Number : 0141-2337955, Mobile Number : 9413094957
  • Dr.B.S. Punia - Govt Service, Director Animal Husbandry, Central Institute for Research on Buffalow, Hissar, 45, Bank Colony, Delhi Road, Hissar, Haryana Ph: 01662-228330, 9812132475 (PP-884)
  • Maj. General Dr. V. S. Punia - Director PGIMS, Rohtak Haryana Govt. Director's Residence,PGIMS Rohtak Haryana, Ph:01262-242269, 01262-250893 (PP-1008)
  • rohtash pooniya v.p.o. - dhandhal shera, teh. - rajgarh , churu
  • Dr.Virendra Singh (Punia) - Superintendent SMS Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan.
  • श्री बजरंग सिंह पूनियां, ए.डी.एम. रोडवेज झुन्झूनु
  • Capt. Subhash Chand Punia - Kirti Chara, Unit - 21 Para SF

See also

Gallery of Punia people

References

  1. B S Dahiya:Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study), p.242, s.n.183
  2. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. प-23
  3. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. प-23
  4. Jat History Dalip Singh Ahlawat/Parishisht-I, s.n. 69
  5. O.S.Tugania:Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu, p.49, s.n. 1560
  6. Jat History Thakur Deshraj/Chapter IX,p.695
  7. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan, H. W. Bellew, p.121,128,129,162
  8. Dilip Singh Ahlawat: Jat viron ka Itihas
  9. Mahendra Singh Arya et al: Adhunik Jat Itihas,p. 262
  10. Thakur Deshraj: ‘Jat Itihas’ (History of the Jats), 1992, pp. 617-618
  11. Dilip Singh Ahlawat: Jat viron ka Itihas
  12. Ashok Dingar & A.B. Sumrao, “Maharashtra mein Jaton ki Biradari” – Jat Veer Smarika 1987-88, Jat Samaj Kalyan Parishad Gwalior. pp. 65,66,67
  13. पुण्यनामा सुनामा च सुवक्त्रः परियदर्शनः। परिश्रुतः कॊक नदः परिय माल्यानुलेपनः ||Mahabharata (9.44.55)
  14. The Jats: Their Origin, Antiquity and Migration, p. 136
  15. The Jats: Their Origin, Antiquity and Migration, Rohtak, 1993, ISBN 81-85235-22-8, p. 353
  16. Vayu Purans, 1.45.127
  17. ibid, 45.127
  18. M R Singh, A critical study of the Geog. Data in Ear. Purs., Punthi Pustak, Calcutta, 1972, p. 286
  19. Cf. G. Yazdani, Early history of Deccan, p. 36
  20. Cunningham, Historical Geog. of Ancient India, p. 184
  21. D D Kosambi, The Culture and Civilization of Ancient India, Vikas Publishing House, Delhi, 1976, p. 80
  22. ibid
  23. Jain, op. cit, pp. 99-100
  24. RV, 6.4.2.31
  25. Jain, op. cit., p. 48
  26. RV VI 45.31
  27. Nripendra Kumar Dutta, op. cit., p. 96
  28. RV VII 63
  29. Ram Chandra Jain, The most ancient Aryan society, Varanasi, 1964, p. 72
  30. His. of Mexico, Maxican Government Pbn. q. by Chaman Lal, Hindu America, 1956, p. 256
  31. DA Mackenzie, Myths of Pre-Columbia America, pp. 2, 256, 265f
  32. Jats the Ancient Rulers (A clan study)/Jat Clan in India,p. 267
  33. Budha Prakash,Studies in Indian History and Civilization, p.263
  34. v, 12-27
  35. Thakur Deshraj: Jat Itihas (Hindi), Maharaja Suraj Mal Smarak Shiksha Sansthan, Delhi, 1934.
  36. James Tod: "Annals and Antiquities of Rajasthan (1829)"
  37. Jat Samaj, Agra : November 2000
  38. Elliot, op. cit., Vol.I, p.133
  39. Muhammad Qasim Hindu Shah Firista, Gulsan-i-Ibrahimi, commonly known as Tarikh-i-Firishta, Nawal Kishore edition, (Kanpur, 1865), Vol.I, p.35
  40. Dr S.Jabir Raza, The Jats - Their Role and Contribution to the Socio-Economic Life and Polity of North and North West India. Vol I, 2004, Ed Dr Vir Singh
  41. Inscription No.1, Tod, op.cit., Vol.I, p. 622-23.
  42. Encyclopedia of Islam, vol.II, p.488
  43. Chachnama, pp.98, 117,131
  44. Zai'nul-Akhbar, p.191; Tarikh-i-Firishta, Vol.I,p.35
  45. Chachnama, pp.104,167
  46. Richard F. Burton, op. cit., p.246
  47. Inscription No.1, Tod, op.cit., Vol.II, Appendix pp. 914-917.
  48. 48.0 48.1 Dr S.Jabir Raza, The Jats - Their Role and Contribution to the Socio-Economic Life and Polity of North and North West India. Vol I, 2004, Ed Dr Vir Singh
  49. Inscription No.II, Tod, op.cit., Vol.II, Appendix, pp. 917-919 and n. 13
  50. Chachnama, p.166
  51. Hasan Nizami, Tajul-ma'asir, Fascimile translation in ED, Vol. II, p.218
  52. दिव्य द्वारका, प्रकाशक: दण्डी स्वामी श्री सदानन्द सरस्वती जी, सचिव श्रीद्वारकाधीश संस्कृत अकेडमी एण्ड इंडोलॉजिकल रिसर्च द्वारका गुजरात, 2013, पृ.16
  53. दिव्य द्वारका, प्रकाशक: दण्डी स्वामी श्री सदानन्द सरस्वती जी, सचिव श्रीद्वारकाधीश संस्कृत अकेडमी एण्ड इंडोलॉजिकल रिसर्च द्वारका गुजरात, 2013, पृ.16
  54. Aitihasik Sthanavali,p. 272
  55. Ram Swarup Joon: History of the Jats’ (1938, 1967)
  56. JAMES LEGGE : A RECORD OF BUDDHISTIC KINGDOMS (Being an Account by the Chinese Monk Fa-Hien of his Travels in India and Ceylon (A.D. 399-414) in Search of the Buddhist Books of Discipline Translated and annotated with a Corean recension of the Chinese text)
  57. An Inquiry Into the Ethnography of Afghanistan By H. W. Bellew, The Oriental University Institute, Woking, 1891, p.53-54
  58. Dr S.M. Yunus Jaffery:The Jats - Vol.I, 2004. Page 38, Ed. by Dr Vir Singh, Publisher - M/S Originals (an imprint of low priced publications), Delhi-110052.
  59. Dr Ompal Singh Tugania: Jat Samuday ke Pramukh Adhar Bindu, p. 18
  60. Jat Bandhu, Agra, April 1991
  61. History and study of the Jats. B.S Dhillon. p.126

External link

Further reading

  • Thakur Deshraj: Jat Itihas (Hindi), Maharaja Suraj Mal Smarak Shiksha Sansthan, Delhi, 1934.
  • Ram Swarup Joon: History of the Jats, Rohtak, India (1938, 1967)
  • JAMES LEGGE : A RECORD OF BUDDHISTIC KINGDOMS (Being an Account by the Chinese Monk Fa-Hien of his Travels in India and Ceylon (A.D. 399-414) in Search of the Buddhist Books of Discipline Translated and annotated with a Corean recension of the Chinese text)

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